Young Chekhov

Platonov; Ivanov; The Seagull

Author: Anton Chekhov

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 368

Young Chekhov contains a trilogy of plays by the Russian writer Anton Chekhov, written as he emerged as the greatest playwright of the late nineteenth century. The three works, Platanov, Ivanov and The Seagull, in contemporary adaptations by David Hare, will be staged at the Chichester Festival Theatre in the summer of 2015.

The Prank

The Best of Young Chekhov

Author: Anton Chekhov

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 144

View: 858

An NYRB Classics Original The Prank is Chekhov’s own selection of the best of his early work, the first book he put together and the first book he hoped to publish. Assembled in 1882, with illustrations by Nikolay Chekhov, the book was then presented to the censor for approval—which was denied. Now, more than a hundred and thirty years later, The Prank appears here for the first time in any language. At the start of his twenties, when he was still in medical school, Anton Chekhov was also busily setting himself up as a prolific and popular writer. Appearing in a wide range of periodicals, his shrewd, stinging, funny stories and sketches turned a mocking eye on the mating rituals and money-grubbing habits of the middle classes, the pretensions of aspiring artists and writers, bureaucratic corruption, drunken clowning, provincial ignorance, petty cruelty—on Russian life, in short. Chekhov was already developing his distinctive ear for spoken language, its opacities and evasions, the clichés we shelter behind and the clichés that betray us. The lively stories in The Prank feature both the themes and the characteristic tone that make Chekhov among the most influential and beloved of modern writers.

Information Bulletin

Author: Soviet Union. Posolʹstvo (U.S.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page:

View: 852

Michael Chekhov

Author: Franc Chamberlain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 168

View: 176

All books in the Routledge Performance Practitioners series are carefully designed to enable the reader to understand the work of a key practitioner. They provide the first step towards critical understanding and a springboard for further study for students on twentieth century, contemporary theatre and theatre history courses. Michael Chekhov's unique approach to and lasting impact on actor training is only now beginning to be fully appreciated. This volume provides, for the first time, a fully comprehensive introduction to his life and times, his most notable productions, his classic writings and his practical exercises. Franc Chamberlain unravels Chekhov's contributions to modern theatre through: an exploration of his life examination of his major work analysis of Checkhov's key productions reproduction of practical exercises.

Chekhov's Letters

Biography, Context, Poetics

Author: Carol Apollonio

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 268

This collection examines the letters of Anton Chekhov, which have received relatively little scholarly attention. The contributors approach the letters from a variety of angles—biography, psychology, literary criticism, poetics, and history—to characterize Chekhov’s key epistolary concerns and to examine their role in his life.

Seeing Chekhov

Life and Art

Author: Michael C. Finke

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 237

View: 479

Chekhov's keen powers of observation have been remarked by both memoirists who knew him well and scholars who approach him only through the written record and across the distance of many decades. To apprehend Chekhov means seeing how Chekhov sees, and the author's remarkable vision is understood as deriving from his occupational or professional training and identity. But we have failed to register, let alone understand, just what a central concern for Chekhov himself, and how deeply problematic, were precisely issues of seeing and being seen.--from the Introduction Michael C. Finke explodes a century of critical truisms concerning Chekhov's objective eye and what being a physician gave him as a writer in a book that foregrounds the deeply subjective and self-reflexive aspects of his fiction and drama. In exploring previously unrecognized seams between the author's life and his verbal art, Finke profoundly alters and deepens our understanding of Chekhov's personality and behaviors, provides startling new interpretations of a broad array of Chekhov's texts, and fleshes out Chekhov's simultaneous pride in his identity as a physician and devastating critique of turn-of-the-century medical practices and ideologies. Seeing Chekhov is essential reading for students of Russian literature, devotees of the short story and modern drama, and anyone interested in the intersection of literature, psychology, and medicine.

The Cambridge Introduction to Chekhov

Author: James N. Loehlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 147

Chekhov is widely acknowledged as one of the most influential literary figures of modern times. Russia's preeminent playwright, he played a significant role in revolutionizing the modern theatre. His impact on prose fiction writing is incalculable: he helped define the modern short story. Beginning with an engaging account of Chekhov's life and cultural context in nineteenth-century Russia, this book introduces the reader to this fascinating and complex personality. Unlike much criticism of Chekhov, it includes detailed discussions of both his fiction and his plays. The Introduction traces his concise, impressionistic prose style from early comic sketches to mature works such as 'Ward No. 6' and 'In the Ravine'. Examining Chekhov's development as a dramatist, the book considers his one-act vaudevilles and early works, while providing a detailed, act-by-act analysis of the masterpieces on which his reputation rests: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard.

Chekhov

"the Vaudevilles" and Other Short Works

Author: Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

Publisher: Smith & Kraus Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 212

View: 242

Contains translations of eleven comedic short plays by nineteenth-century Russian author Anton Chekhov, written in the early years of his career, from 1885 to 1891.

Chekhov

Scenes from a Life

Author: Rosamund Bartlett

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Limited

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 395

View: 900

Rosamund Bartlett is steeped in Chekhov's writings, having worked as a translator and lecturer on the culture and history of nineteenth-century Russia. She has written not simply another biography of Chekhov but brought new understanding to the writings and character of the man, set amidst the formidable landscape of the Russia he loved. This is a book of enormous detail about the places Chekhov visited and lived in, which is vital for a good understanding of the character of this unusual and complex man. The author examines with careful precision Chekhov's genius, and shows that he is not simply the gloomy writer of popular myth but one with profound humanity and humour.

Chekhov

A Collection of Critical Essays

Author: Robert Louis Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Dramatists, Russian

Page: 213

View: 973

The Polemical Force of Chekhov's Comedies

A Rhetorical Analysis

Author: John McKellor Reid

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 208

View: 801

This work is a revisionist study of Anton Chekhov's drama which points out, for the first time, the rhetorical and polemical elements that have remained unnoticed or unmentioned in previous studies. This work will appeal to scholars interested in Chekhov's plays and the polemical force of drama. emasculate the polemical force Chekhovian comedy out of misplaced respect for his renowned objectivity and his loathing of overt moralizing. A rhetorical framework of analysis is predicated upon the assumption that all writings are implicated in 'interestedness' - the critic's task is to uncover the rhetorical parameters and nature of that 'interestedness.' Through analyses of each of Chekhov's plays in its original context, the author identifies the rhetorical potential that remains neglected in contemporary readings and productions. All of the readings in this study are addressed to actors and directors - inviting them to reassess and reclaim the force of these plays for our time.

Anton Chekhov, the Iconoclast

Author: Lee John Williames

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 173

View: 531

Lee J. Williames views Anton Chekhov as a change agent and iconoclast in a manner similar to Zola and Darwin. This study shows that Chekhov was deeply influenced by the scientific method, that he was objective in his representations and that he carefully chose what he wrote about. It was his intention to explode stereotypes by clearly and objectively stating the problems of Russian society in his stories. He felt that his readers would be moved to accomplish change through individual initiative if they saw clearly what the problems were in Russia To demonstrate these points, this work presents an intellectual biography of Chekhov and then examines the objectivity and validity of his views on Russian society.

Chekhov's Leading Lady

A Portrait of the Actress Olga Knipper

Author: Harvey J. Pitcher

Publisher: New York : F. Watts

ISBN:

Category: Actors

Page: 288

View: 655

A biography of a leading actress of the Moscow Art Theatre who became the wife of Anton Chekhov three years before his death.

Early Stories

Author: Anton Chekhov

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 208

View: 573

`Even if he had written nothing else', Ivan Bunin wrote of Chekhov's early stories, `we would still have said that an amazing mind had flashed through Russian literature'.His youthful work immediately established Chekhov as a leading writer of both comic and serious fiction. The humorous tales have delighted Russians since the 1880s, while the many admirers of the more serious stories include James Joyce and Katherine Mansfield. In this selection, stories withpunchy endings jostle with outrageous paradies, fracical situations, the pastoral comedy of Romance with Double-Bass, and the absurdist humour of classics such as The Death of a Civil Servant. But the volume also contains some of Chekhov's finest stories about children, `non-love' stories like TheLittle Joke and The Kiss, the hauntingly lyrical Easter Night, and the chilling Let Me Sleep. This translation does full justice to the masterful range of the young Chekhov; for those unfamiliar with his early work this edition will be a revelation.

A Life of Anton Chekhov

Author: Ronald Hingley

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Authors, Russian

Page: 358

View: 492

Considers the life and work of one of Russia's greatest writers, known for his plays and short fiction