Writing Better Requirements

Author: Ian F. Alexander

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 159

View: 108

Well-written requirements are crucial to systems of all kinds. This text explains and demonstrates exactly what requirements are for, and how to write them. It provides practical techniques and defines key terms, explaining and illustrating to develop the skills of good requirements writing.

The Requirements Engineering Handbook

Author: Ralph Rowland Young

Publisher: Artech House

ISBN:

Category: Computer software

Page: 254

View: 841

A concise and thorough handbook on requirements analysis, this invaluable book is the perfect desk guide for your systems or software development work. This first-of-its-kind handbook enables you to identify the real customer requirements for your projects and control changes and additions to these requirements. The books helps you understand the importance of requirements, leverage effective requirements practices, and better utilize resources. You also learn how to strengthen interpersonal relationships and communications which are major contributors to project effectiveness.

Telling Stories

A Short Path to Writing Better Software Requirements

Author: Ben Rinzler

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 160

View: 169

From System Designers to Top Management, Everyone loves a good story Once upon a time, it was well understood that stories teach better than plain facts. Why then are most software requirements documents a baffling hodge-podge of diagrams, data dictionaries, and bullet points, held together by little more than a name and a staple? Telling Stories teaches you to combine proven standards of requirements analysis with the most ancient and effective tool for sharing information, the narrative. Telling Stories simplifies and refines the classic methods of Structured Analysis, providing organization, design, and old-fashioned writing advice. Whether you?re just getting started or an experienced requirements writer, Telling Stories can help you turn dull, detailed material into an engaging, logical, and readable story, a story that can make the difference for your project and your career. Learn why readers believe and remember what they learn from stories Work with team members to gather content, tell their stories, and win their support Use stories to find every requirement Create diagrams that almost tell the story on their own (while looking clear and professional) Explain everything important about a process Use precise language to remove the ambiguity from requirements Write a forceful executive summary that stands on its own and sells a project to senior management Summarize often to keep the reader focused on key issues Structure the document so every part has a clear place and purpose

Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality

18th International Working Conference, REFSQ 2012, Essen, Germany, March 2012, Proceedings

Author: Björn Regnell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 322

View: 347

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 18th International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality, REFSQ 2012, held in Essen, Germany, in March 2012. The papers are organized in 10 topical sections on contractual requirements, quality requirements, collaboration, complexity and creativity, requirements analysis, templates and heuristics, requirements traceability, tools and quality, services and clouds, self-adaptivity, and industrial case studies.

Software Requirement Patterns

Author: Stephen Withall

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 384

View: 441

Learn proven, real-world techniques for specifying software requirements with this practical reference. It details 30 requirement “patterns” offering realistic examples for situation-specific guidance for building effective software requirements. Each pattern explains what a requirement needs to convey, offers potential questions to ask, points out potential pitfalls, suggests extra requirements, and other advice. This book also provides guidance on how to write other kinds of information that belong in a requirements specification, such as assumptions, a glossary, and document history and references, and how to structure a requirements specification. A disturbing proportion of computer systems are judged to be inadequate; many are not even delivered; more are late or over budget. Studies consistently show one of the single biggest causes is poorly defined requirements: not properly defining what a system is for and what it’s supposed to do. Even a modest contribution to improving requirements offers the prospect of saving businesses part of a large sum of wasted investment. This guide emphasizes this important requirement need—determining what a software system needs to do before spending time on development. Expertly written, this book details solutions that have worked in the past, with guidance for modifying patterns to fit individual needs—giving developers the valuable advice they need for building effective software requirements

Requirements Management

How to Ensure You Achieve What You Need from Your Projects

Author: Dr Mario Kossmann

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 212

View: 172

Poor requirements management is one of the top five contributors to poor project performance. In extreme, safety critical or emergency-relief situations, failure to satisfy the real needs of the project stakeholders may well lead directly to loss of life or human suffering; other, more mundane, projects can also be severely compromised. Dr Mario Kossmann’s Requirements Management looks at the process from the perspectives of both Program and Project Management and Systems Engineering, showing the crucial role of RM in both contexts. The author puts great emphasis on the human aspects of any project, which is also significant given that over-emphasis on technical or technological aspects at the expense of the human side is another major source of project shortfalls. The book offers illustrated examples of systems of different levels of complexity (one simple system, one complex, and one highly complex system) to help you categorize your own system and enable you to select the right level of formality, a suitable organization and a set of techniques and tools to carry out your requirements work. It includes a series of comprehensive checklists which can be used immediately to improve urgent requirements aspects. This is a practical and realistic guide to requirements management that provides a flexible, hands-on and innovative approach to developing and managing program, project and system requirements at different levels of complexity; read it and use the advice offered to ensure your projects can actually deliver, first time, without the need for costly and time-consuming rework.

Just Enough Requirements Management

Where Software Development Meets Marketing

Author: Alan Davis

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 144

View: 291

This is the digital version of the printed book (Copyright © 2005). If you develop software without understanding the requirements, you're wasting your time. On the other hand, if a project spends too much time trying to understand the requirements, it will end up late and/or over-budget. And products that are created by such projects can be just as unsuccessful as those that fail to meet the basic requirements. Instead, every company must make a reasonable trade-off between what's required and what time and resources are available. Finding the right balance for your project may depend on many factors, including the corporate culture, the time-to-market pressure, and the criticality of the application. That is why requirements management—gathering requirements, identifying the "right" ones to satisfy, and documenting them—is essential. Just Enough Requirements Management shows you how to discover, prune, and document requirements when you are subjected to tight schedule constraints. You'll apply just enough process to minimize risks while still achieving desired outcomes. You'll determine how many requirements are just enough to satisfy your customers while still meeting your goals for schedule, budget, and resources. If your project has insufficient resources to satisfy all the requirements of your customers, you must read Just Enough Requirements Management.

Scenarios, Stories, Use Cases

Through the Systems Development Life-Cycle

Author: Ian F. Alexander

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 544

View: 335

Extending the scenario method beyond interface design, this important book shows developers how to design more effective systems by soliciting, analyzing, and elaborating stories from end-users Contributions from leading industry consultants and opinion-makers present a range of scenario techniques, from the light, sketchy, and agile to the careful and systematic Includes real-world case studies from Philips, DaimlerChrysler, and Nokia, and covers systems ranging from custom software to embedded hardware-software systems

How to Write Effective Requirements for IT – Simply Put!

Use Four Simple Rules to Improve the Quality of Your IT Requirements

Author: Thomas and Angela Hathaway

Publisher: BA-Experts

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 111

View: 806

WHAT IS THIS BOOK ABOUT? Effective Requirements Reduce Project Failures Writing requirements is one of the core competencies for anyone in an organization responsible for defining future Information Technology (IT) applications. However, nearly every independently executed root-cause analysis of IT project problems and failures in the past half-century have identified “misunderstood or incomplete requirements” as the primary cause. This has made writing requirements the bane of many projects. The real problem is the subtle differences between “understanding” someone else’s requirement and “sharing a common understanding” with the author. “How to Write Effective Requirements for IT – Simply Put!” gives you a set of 4 simple rules that will make your requirement statements more easily understood by all target audiences. The focus is to increase the “common understanding” between the author of a requirement and the solution providers (e.g., in-house or outsourced IT designers, developers, analysts, and vendors). The rules we present in this book will reduce the failure rate of projects suffering from poor requirements. Regardless of your job title or role, if you are tasked with communicating your future needs to others, this book is for you. How to Get the Most out of this Book? To maximize the learning effect, you will have optional, online exercises to assess your understanding of each presented technique. Chapter titles prefaced with the phrase “Exercise” contain a link to a web-based exercise that we have prepared to give you an opportunity to try the presented technique yourself. These exercises are optional and they do not “test” your knowledge in the conventional sense. Their purpose is to demonstrate the use of the technique more real-life than our explanations can supply. You need Internet access to perform the exercises. We hope you enjoy them and that they make it easier for you to apply the techniques in real life. Specifically, this eWorkbook will give you techniques to: - Express business and stakeholder requirements in simple, complete sentences - Write requirements that focus on the business need - Test the relevance of each requirement to ensure that it is in scope for your project - Translate business needs and wants into requirements as the primary tool for defining a future solution and setting the stage for testing - Create and maintain a question file to reduce the impact of incorrect assumptions - Minimize the risk of scope creep caused by missed requirements - Ensure that your requirements can be easily understood by all target audiences - Confirm that each audience shares a mutual understanding of the requirements - Isolate and address ambiguous words and phrases in requirements. - Use our Peer Perception technique to find words and phrases that can lead to misunderstandings. - Reduce the ambiguity of a statement by adding context and using standard terms and phrases TOM AND ANGELA’S (the authors) STORY Like all good IT stories, theirs started on a project many years ago. Tom was the super techie, Angela the super SME. They fought their way through the 3-year development of a new policy maintenance system for an insurance company. They vehemently disagreed on many aspects, but in the process discovered a fundamental truth about IT projects. The business community (Angela) should decide on the business needs while the technical team’s (Tom)’s job was to make the technology deliver what the business needed. Talk about a revolutionary idea! All that was left was learning how to communicate with each other without bloodshed to make the project a resounding success. Mission accomplished. They decided this epiphany was so important that the world needed to know about it. As a result, they made it their mission (and their passion) to share this ground-breaking concept with the rest of the world. To achieve that lofty goal, they married and began the mission that still defines their life. After over 30 years of living and working together 24x7x365, they are still wildly enthusiastic about helping the victims of technology learn how to ask for and get the digital (IT) solutions they need to do their jobs better. More importantly, they are more enthusiastically in love with each other than ever before!