Writing and Reading Mental Health Records

Issues and Analysis in Professional Writing and Scientific Rhetoric

Author: J. Frederick Reynolds

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 120

View: 957

This revised and updated second edition is a rhetorical analysis of written communication in the mental health community. As such, it contributes to the growing body of research being done in rhetoric and composition studies on the nature of writing and reading in highly specialized professional discourse communities. Many compelling questions answered in this volume include: * What "ideological biases" are reflected in the language the nurse/rhetorician uses to talk to and talk about the patient? * How does language figure into the process of constructing meaning in this context? * What social interactions -- with the patient, with other nurses, with physicians -- influence the nurse's attempt to construct meaning in this context? * How do the readers of assessment construct their own meanings of the assessment? Based on an ongoing collaboration between composition studies specialists and mental health practitioners, this book presents research of value not only to writing scholars and teachers, but also to professional clinicians, their teachers, and those who read mental health records in order to make critically important decisions. It can also be valuable as a model for other scholars to follow when conducting similar long-range studies of other writing-intensive professions.

Writing and Reading Mental Health Records

Issues and Analysis

Author: Fred Reynolds

Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 109

View: 438

The accuracy and completeness of mental health records are crucial in the effective treatment of patients. In addition, such records can form the primary bases for profound legal decisions including civil litigation and involuntary commitment to an institution. This volume explains the importance of mental health records to patients, practitioners and third parties such as courts, employers, insurance companies as well as future patients and practitioners. The book is illustrated by `real life' comments by health professionals from a variety of backgrounds who describe their experiences of the often frustrating process of record keeping.

Professional Writing in Context

Lessons From Teaching and Consulting in Worlds of Work

Author: John Frederick Reynolds

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 334

This volume explores adult work-world writing issues from the perspectives of five seasoned professionals who have logged hundreds of hours working with adults on complicated written communication problems. It examines the gap between school-world instructional practices and real-world problems and situations. After describing the five major economic sectors which are writing intensive, the text suggests curricular reforms which might better prepare college-educated writers for these worlds. Because the volume is based on the extensive work-world experiences of the authors, it offers numerous examples of real-world writing problems and strategies which illustrate concretely what goes wrong and what needs to be done about it.

Qualitative Nursing Research

A Contemporary Dialogue

Author: Janice M. Morse

Publisher: SAGE Publications, Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 556

Qualitative Nursing Research addresses many of the problematic issues in qualitative research. Leading qualitative methodologists from orientations in phenomenology, grounded theory and ethnography contribute chapters on their favourite issues, which also form the bases for the `dialogues' which alternate with each chapter. With the exception of a few chapters that describe a single method, the problems discussed relate to every qualitative nursing project: improving the use of self; examining one's own culture; some myths and realities of qualitative sampling; debates about counting and coding data; and ethical issues in interviewing.

Reference Guide to Writing Across the Curriculum

Author: Charles Bazerman

Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 188

View: 639

This reference guide traces the writing across the curriculum movement from its origins in British secondary education through its flourishing in American higher education and extension to American primary and secondary education.

Methodologies for the Rhetoric of Health & Medicine

Author: Lisa Meloncon

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 314

View: 516

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- List of Figures and Tables -- Contributors -- 1 Manifesting Methodologies for the Rhetoric of Health & Medicine -- 2 Historical Work in the Discourses of Health and Medicine -- 3 Ecological Investments and the Circulation of Rhetoric: Studying the "Saving Knowledge" of Dr. Emma Walker's Social Hygiene Lectures -- 4 Infrastructural Methodology: A Case in Protein as Public Health -- 5 Health Communication Methodology and Race -- 6 Bringing the Body Back Through Performative Phenomenology -- 7 "No Single Path": Desire Lines and Divergent Pathographies in Health and Medicine -- 8 Rhetorically Listening for Microwithdrawals of Consent in Research Practice -- 9 Medical Interiors: Materiality and Spatiality in Medical Rhetoric Research Methods -- 10 Ethical Research in "Health 2.0": Considerations for Scholars of Medical Rhetoric -- 11 Negotiating Informed Consent: Bueno aconsejar, mejor remediar (it is good to give advice, but it is better to solve the problem) -- 12 Translingual Rhetorical Engagement in Transcultural Health Spaces -- 13 Assemblage Mapping: A Research Methodology for Rhetoricians of Health and Medicine -- 14 Medicalized Mosquitoes: Rhetorical Invention in Genetic Engineering for Disease Control -- 15 Experiments in Rhetoric: Invention and Neurorhetorical Play -- Index

Current Catalog

Author: National Library of Medicine (U.S.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Medicine

Page:

View: 675

First multi-year cumulation covers six years: 1965-70.

Standards and Guidelines for the Psychotherapies

Author: Paul M. Cameron

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 499

View: 257

A comprehensive overview of the art and science of psychotherapy and a set of practice guidelines for psychiatrist developed from a report by the Joint Task Force on Standards and Guidelines for Medical (Psychiatric) Psychotherapy of the OPA and OMA.

Rhetorical Work in Emergency Medical Services

Communicating in the Unpredictable Workplace

Author: Elizabeth L. Angeli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 204

View: 194

Rhetorical Work in Emergency Medical Services: Communicating in the Unpredictable Workplace details how communicators harness the power of rhetoric to make decisions and communicate in unpredictable contexts. Grounded in a 16-month study in the emergency medical services (EMS) workplace, this text contributes to our theoretical, methodological, and practical understandings of the situation-specific processes that communicators and researchers engage in to respond to the urgencies and constraints of high-stakes workplaces. This book presents these intricate processes and skills—learned and innate—that workplace communicators use to accomplish goal-directed activity, collaborate with other communicators, and complete and teach workplace writing.

Rhetorical Ethos in Health and Medicine

Patient Credibility, Stigma, and Misdiagnosis

Author: Cathryn Molloy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 469

This book explores rhetorical ethos and its ongoing role in patients’ credibility and in misdiagnoses stemming from gender, race and class-based biases. Drawing on the concept of ethos as a theoretical framework, it explores health and mental illness across different conditions and across different methodological approaches. Extending work on ethos in clinical encounters and public discourse about biomedicine and presenting new research on the rhetoric of mental health, stigma and mental illness, the book explores how bias in clinical settings can lead to symptoms labelled "in the patient’s head" masking treatable medical problems. This notable contribution to the rhetoric of health and medicine will be of interest to all researchers and graduate students of rhetoric and composition studies, rhetoric of health and medicine, disability studies, medical humanities, communication, and psychology.

Black Dogs and Blue Words

Depression and Gender in the Age of Self-Care

Author: Kimberly K. Emmons

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 262

His "black dog"--that was how Winston Churchill referred to his own depression. Today, individuals with feelings of sadness and irritability are encouraged to "talk to your doctor." These have become buzz words in the aggressive promotion of wonder-drug cures since 1997, when the Food and Drug Administration changed its guidelines for the marketing of prescription pharmaceuticals. Black Dogs and Blue Words analyzes the rhetoric surrounding depression. Kimberly K. Emmons maintains that the techniques and language of depression marketing strategies--vague words such as "worry," "irritability," and "loss of interest"--target women and young girls and encourage self-diagnosis and self-medication. Further, depression narratives and other texts encode a series of gendered messages about health and illness. As depression and other forms of mental illness move from the medical-professional sphere into that of the consumer-public, the boundary at which distress becomes disease grows ever more encompassing, the need for remediation and treatment increasingly warranted. Black Dogs and Blue Words demonstrates the need for rhetorical reading strategies as one response to these expanding and gendered illness definitions.

Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Skills

A Popular Culture Casebook Approach (DSM-5 Update)

Author: Alan M. Schwitzer

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 279

The Second Edition of Alan M. Schwitzer and Lawrence C. Rubin’s Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Skills: A Popular Culture Casebook Approach comprehensively addresses the clinical thinking skills required in professional counseling settings through the innovative use of case examples drawn from popular culture. Fully revised to include DSM-5, the text begins with discussion of diagnosis, case conceptualization, and treatment planning, covering the interplay of individual clinical tools and their application in contemporary practice. Ten DSM-5 updated case illustrations follow, creating a streamlined new edition that engages students in a start-to-finish application of clinical tools.

Rhetoric, Cultural Studies, and Literacy

Selected Papers From the 1994 Conference of the Rhetoric Society of America

Author: J. Frederick Reynolds

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 445

This volume presents a representative cross-section of the more than 200 papers presented at the 1994 conference of the Rhetoric Society of America. The contributors reflect multi- and inter-disciplinary perspectives -- English, speech communication, philosophy, rhetoric, composition studies, comparative literature, and film and media studies. Exploring the historical relationships and changing relationships between rhetoric, cultural studies, and literacy in the United States, this text seeks answers to such questions as what constitutes "literacy" in a post-modern, high-tech, multi-cultural society?

Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality

Author: T. Mark Harwood

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 475

View: 950

A complete, thorough, and pragmatic guide to clinical assessment, this authoritative book meets a key need for both students and practitioners. T. Mark Harwood, Larry E. Beutler, Gary Groth-Marnat, and their associates describe how to construct a "moving picture" of each patient by integrating data from a variety of sources. Included are detailed, systematic reviews of widely used instruments together with strategies for selecting the best methods for particular referral questions. Readers learn to conduct integrated assessments that take the complexities of the individual personality into account, serve as the basis for developing an effective treatment plan, and facilitate meaningful reporting and client feedback. New to This Edition *Incorporates the latest research findings and assessment/treatment planning tools. *Chapters on the Personality Assessment Inventory and the NEO-PI-R and NEO-PI-3. *A new extended case example runs throughout the chapters. *Critically evaluates the recently published MMPI-2-RF.

Encyclopedia of Clinical Child and Pediatric Psychology

Author: Thomas H. Ollendick

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 748

View: 929

One volume-reference work with approximately 300 entries Each entry will contain 5-8 references Entries will kept under 7 pages, with limited references and cross-referenced to 5 other topics in the encyclopdia

Generation Vet

Composition, Student Veterans, and the Post-9/11 University

Author: Sue Doe

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 242

View: 571

Institutions of higher education are experiencing the largest influx of enrolled veterans since World War II, and these student veterans are transforming post-secondary classroom dynamics. While many campus divisions like admissions and student services are actively moving to accommodate the rise in this demographic, little research about this population and their educational needs is available, and academic departments have been slower to adjust. In Generation Vet, fifteen chapters offer well-researched, pedagogically savvy recommendations for curricular and programmatic responses to student veterans for English and writing studies departments. In work with veterans in writing-intensive courses and community contexts, questions of citizenship, disability, activism, community-campus relationships, and retention come to the fore. Moreover, writing-intensive courses can be sites of significant cultural exchanges—even clashes—as veterans bring military values, rhetorical traditions, and communication styles that may challenge the values, beliefs, and assumptions of traditional college students and faculty. This classroom-oriented text addresses a wide range of issues concerning veterans, pedagogy, rhetoric, and writing program administration. Written by diverse scholar-teachers and written in diverse genres, the essays in this collection promise to enhance our understanding of student veterans, composition pedagogy and administration, and the post-9/11 university.

Rhetorical Memory and Delivery

Classical Concepts for Contemporary Composition and Communication

Author: John Frederick Reynolds

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 274

Why has classical rhetoric been a subject of such growing interest for the past ten years? Because the most exciting work in classical rhetoric has asked us to rethink classical concepts in modern terms. What's been missing, at least in book-length form, is a scholarly rethinking of rhetorical memory and delivery. As many scholars have been noting in their work for some time now, three of five classical issues -- invention, arrangement, and style -- have dominated rhetorical studies while the other two -- memory and delivery -- have largely been misunderstood or ignored. Re-examined in light of recent research on orality, literacy, and electronic technology, rhetorical memory and delivery issues can become not only central to the field but also key to the continued interest in classical rhetoric. Bringing together national scholars from a variety of related disciplines in which rhetorical memory and delivery issues matter, this collection is the only volume that examines classical and contemporary interpretations of rhetorical memory and delivery in depth and detail.

Contrastive Rhetoric Revisited and Redefined

Author: Clayann Gilliam Panetta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 796

The theory of contrastive rhetoric was first put forth by Robert Kaplan in the mid 1960s to explain the differences in writing and discourse between students who were native speakers of English and their international counterparts. Over the past three decades, contrastive rhetoric theory has been used primarily by linguists in language centers and involved in ESL teaching. As the number of international students in American universities has continued to grow, contrastive rhetoric has become increasingly relevant to all disciplines, and to rhetoric and composition in particular. This volume breaks important new ground in its examination of contrastive rhetoric in the exclusive context of composition. The editor has assembled contributors with varying areas of specialty to demonstrate how the traditional definition of contrastive rhetoric theory can be applied to composition in new and innovative ways and how it can be redefined through the lens of addressing "difference" issues in writing. Thus, the volume as a whole clarifies how the basic principles of contrastive rhetoric theory can help composition instructors to understand writing and rhetorical decisions. With the inclusion of current research on multicultural issues, this collection is appropriate for all instructors in ESL writing, including teachers in rhetoric, composition, and linguistics. It can also be used as an advanced text for students in these areas. Wherever it is employed, it is certain to offer significant new insights into the application of contrastive rhetoric within the composition discipline.