Medicine in the Crusades

Warfare, Wounds and the Medieval Surgeon

Author: Piers D. Mitchell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 867

Presents a detailed description of medieval medical treatments available during the Crusades.

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 688

This volume brings together essays that consider wounding and/or wound repair from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe.

Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 659

The scholarly collection of Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages examines connections between doctors, lawyers, laws, regulations, professionalization, administration, literature, hagiography and health from an international perspective.

Wounds in the Middle Ages

Author: Dr Anne Kirkham

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 603

This book focuses on the representation, perception and treatment of wounds in the Middle Ages. Contributors situate wounds within the context of religious belief before turning to theory, symbolism, and more grounded spheres involving the law and the battlefield. Adopting an innovative approach to the subject, this book will appeal to all those interested in how past societies regarded health, disease and medicine as well as the ethical, religious and cultural dimensions that structured social perception.

Man and Wound in the Ancient World

A History of Military Medicine from Sumer to the Fall of Constantinople

Author: Richard A. Gabriel

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 262

Examines the fascinating role of medicine in ancient military cultures; Shows how the ancients understood the body, patched up their warriors, and sent them back into battle; Reveals medical secrets lost during the Dark Ages; Explores how ancient civilizations' technologies have influenced modern medical practices

Narcissism and Selfhood in Medieval French Literature

Wounds of Desire

Author: Nicholas Ealy

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 958

This book offers analyses of texts from medieval France influenced by Ovid’s myth of Narcissus including the Lay of Narcissus, Alain de Lille’s Plaint of Nature, René d’Anjou’s Love-Smitten Heart, Chrétien de Troyes’s Story of the Grail and Guillaume de Machaut’s Fountain of Love. Together, these texts form a corpus exploring human selfhood as wounded and undone by desire. Emerging in the twelfth century in Western Europe, this discourse of the wounded self has survived with ever-increasing importance, informing contemporary methods of theoretical inquiry into mourning, melancholy, trauma and testimony. Taking its cue from the moment Narcissus bruises himself upon learning he cannot receive the love he wants from his reflection, this book argues that the construct of the wounded self emphasizes fantasy over reality, and that only through the world of the imagination—of literature itself—can our narcissistic injuries seemingly be healed and desire fulfilled.

Medieval Bodies: Life and Death in the Middle Ages

Author: Jack Hartnell

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 827

With wit, wisdom, and a sharp scalpel, Jack Hartnell dissects the medieval body and offers a remedy to our preconceptions. Just like us, medieval men and women worried about growing old, got blisters and indigestion, fell in love, and had children. And yet their lives were full of miraculous and richly metaphorical experiences radically different from our own, unfolding in a world where deadly wounds might be healed overnight by divine intervention, or where the heart of a king, plucked from his corpse, could be held aloft as a powerful symbol of political rule. In this richly illustrated and unusual history, Jack Hartnell uncovers the fascinating ways in which people thought about, explored, and experienced their physical selves in the Middle Ages, from Constantinople to Cairo and Canterbury. Unfolding like a medieval pageant, and filled with saints, soldiers, caliphs, queens, monks and monstrous beasts, this book throws light on the medieval body from head to toe—revealing the surprisingly sophisticated medical knowledge of the time. Bringing together medicine, art, music, politics, philosophy, religion, and social history, Hartnell's work is an excellent guide to what life was really like for the men and women who lived and died in the Middle Ages. Perfumed and decorated with gold, fetishized or tortured, powerful even beyond death, these medieval bodies are not passive and buried away; they can still teach us what it means to be human. Some images in this ebook are not displayed due to permissions issues.

The Middle Ages

500-1450

Author: Kate Kelly

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 408

Presents a history of medicine and the treatment of disease and injuries from the end of the Roman Empire to the fall of Constantinople.

Wound Healing and Skin Physiology

Author: Peter Altmeyer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 717

View: 426

On the occasion of the European Congress on Wound Healing and Skin Physiology (Bochum, Germany, November 1992), an international team of scientists and clinicians discussed the core topics in this important field of dermatological and surgical research. Themes include morphology and physiology, microcirculation and angiogenesis, biochemistry and immunology, microbiology and wound infection, non-invasive measurement techniques, wound repair, surgical treatment, dressings, and agents that promote wound healing.

History in the Comic Mode

Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person

Author: Rachel Fulton Brown

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 127

In this groundbreaking collection, twenty-one prominent medievalists discuss continuity and change in ideas of personhood and community and argue for the viability of the comic mode in the study and recovery of history. These scholars approach their sources not from a particular ideological viewpoint but with an understanding that all topics, questions, and explanations are viable. They draw on a variety of sources in Latin, Arabic, French, German, Middle English, and more, and employ a range of theories and methodologies, always keeping in mind that environments are inseparable from the making of the people who inhabit them and that these people are in part constituted by and understood in terms of their communities. Essays feature close readings of both familiar and lesser known materials, offering provocative interpretations of John of Rupescissa's alchemy; the relationship between the living and the saintly dead in Bernard of Clairvaux's sermons; the nomenclature of heresy in the early eleventh century; the apocalyptic visions of Robert of Uzès; Machiavelli's De principatibus; the role of "demotic religiosity" in economic development; and the visions of Elizabeth of Schönau. Contributors write as historians of religion, art, literature, culture, and society, approaching their subjects through the particular and the singular rather than through the thematic and the theoretical. Playing with the wild possibilities of the historical fragments at their disposal, the scholars in this collection advance a new and exciting approach to writing medieval history.