Wounds in the Middle Ages

Author: Dr Anne Kirkham

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 207

This book focuses on the representation, perception and treatment of wounds in the Middle Ages. Contributors situate wounds within the context of religious belief before turning to theory, symbolism, and more grounded spheres involving the law and the battlefield. Adopting an innovative approach to the subject, this book will appeal to all those interested in how past societies regarded health, disease and medicine as well as the ethical, religious and cultural dimensions that structured social perception.

Medicine in the Crusades

Warfare, Wounds and the Medieval Surgeon

Author: Piers D. Mitchell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 551

Presents a detailed description of medieval medical treatments available during the Crusades.

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 888

This volume brings together essays that consider wounding and/or wound repair from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe.

Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 431

The scholarly collection of Medicine and the Law in the Middle Ages examines connections between doctors, lawyers, laws, regulations, professionalization, administration, literature, hagiography and health from an international perspective.

Man and Wound in the Ancient World

A History of Military Medicine from Sumer to the Fall of Constantinople

Author: Richard A. Gabriel

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 534

Examines the fascinating role of medicine in ancient military cultures; Shows how the ancients understood the body, patched up their warriors, and sent them back into battle; Reveals medical secrets lost during the Dark Ages; Explores how ancient civilizations' technologies have influenced modern medical practices

Wound Healing and Skin Physiology

Author: Peter Altmeyer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 717

View: 656

On the occasion of the European Congress on Wound Healing and Skin Physiology (Bochum, Germany, November 1992), an international team of scientists and clinicians discussed the core topics in this important field of dermatological and surgical research. Themes include morphology and physiology, microcirculation and angiogenesis, biochemistry and immunology, microbiology and wound infection, non-invasive measurement techniques, wound repair, surgical treatment, dressings, and agents that promote wound healing.

Medicine Through Time

Author: Nigel Kelly

Publisher: Heinemann

ISBN:

Category: Medicine

Page: 144

View: 457

Part of a series designed to meet the requirements of the revised GCSE syllabuses, this foundation pupil's book looks at medicine through time. Students explore topics by investigating key issues and there is exam practice at the end of each unit.

History in the Comic Mode

Medieval Communities and the Matter of Person

Author: Rachel Fulton Brown

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 817

In this groundbreaking collection, twenty-one prominent medievalists discuss continuity and change in ideas of personhood and community and argue for the viability of the comic mode in the study and recovery of history. These scholars approach their sources not from a particular ideological viewpoint but with an understanding that all topics, questions, and explanations are viable. They draw on a variety of sources in Latin, Arabic, French, German, Middle English, and more, and employ a range of theories and methodologies, always keeping in mind that environments are inseparable from the making of the people who inhabit them and that these people are in part constituted by and understood in terms of their communities. Essays feature close readings of both familiar and lesser known materials, offering provocative interpretations of John of Rupescissa's alchemy; the relationship between the living and the saintly dead in Bernard of Clairvaux's sermons; the nomenclature of heresy in the early eleventh century; the apocalyptic visions of Robert of Uzès; Machiavelli's De principatibus; the role of "demotic religiosity" in economic development; and the visions of Elizabeth of Schönau. Contributors write as historians of religion, art, literature, culture, and society, approaching their subjects through the particular and the singular rather than through the thematic and the theoretical. Playing with the wild possibilities of the historical fragments at their disposal, the scholars in this collection advance a new and exciting approach to writing medieval history.

The Triumph of the Cross

The Passion of Christ in Theology and the Arts from the Renaissance to the Counter-Reformation

Author: Richard Viladesau

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 755

This is a sequel to Richard Viladesau's well-received study, The Beauty of the Cross: The Passion of Christ in Theology and the Arts from the Catacombs to the Eve of the Renaissance. It continues his project of presenting theological history by using art as both an independent religious or theological "text" and as a means of understanding the cultural context for academic theology. Viladesau argues that art and symbolism function as alternative strands of theological expression sometimes parallel to, sometimes interwoven with, and sometimes in tension with formal theological reflection on the meaning of crucifixion and its role in salvation history. This book examines the two great revolutionary movements that gave birth to the modern West: the Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation. This period was eventful for both theology and art, and thus particularly fruitful for Viladesau's project. Using individual works of art, over sixty of which are reproduced in this book, to epitomize particular artistic and theological models, he explores the contours of each paradigm through the works of representative theologians as well as liturgical, poetic, artistic, and musical sources. To name a few examples, the theologies of Savonarola, Luther, Calvin, and the Council of Trent, are examined in correlation to the new situation of art in the era of Fra Angelico, Leonardo, Michelangelo, D?rer, Cranach, and the Mannerists. In this book, Viladesau continues to deepen our understanding of the foremost symbol of Christianity.

Architecture Post Mortem

The Diastolic Architecture of Decline, Dystopia, and Death

Author: Dr David Bertolini

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 266

View: 401

Architecture Post Mortem surveys architecture’s encounter with death, decline, and ruination following late capitalism. As the world moves closer to an economic abyss that many perceive to be the death of capital, contraction and crisis are no longer mere phases of normal market fluctuations, but rather the irruption of the unconscious of ideology itself. Post mortem is that historical moment wherein architecture’s symbolic contract with capital is put on stage, naked to all. Architecture is not irrelevant to fiscal and political contagion as is commonly believed; it is the victim and penetrating analytical agent of the current crisis. As the very apparatus for modernity’s guilt and unfulfilled drives-modernity’s debt-architecture is that ideological element that functions as a master signifier of its own destruction, ordering all other signifiers and modes of signification beneath it. It is under these conditions that architecture theory has retreated to an 'Alamo' of history, a final desert outpost where history has been asked to transcend itself. For architecture’s hoped-for utopia always involves an apocalypse. This timely collection of essays reformulates architecture’s relation to modernity via the operational death-drive: architecture is but a passage between life and death. This collection includes essays by Kazi K. Ashraf, David Bertolini, Simone Brott, Peggy Deamer, Didem Ekici, Paul Emmons, Donald Kunze, Todd McGowan, Gevork Hartoonian, Nadir Lahiji, Erika Naginski, and Dennis Maher.