Women in Europe between the Wars

Politics, Culture and Society

Author: Angela Kimyongür

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 261

View: 391

The central aim of this interdisciplinary book is to make visible the intentionality behind the 'forgetting' of European women's contributions during the period between the two world wars in the context of politics, culture and society. It also seeks to record and analyse women's agency in the construction and reconstruction of Europe and its nation states after the First World War, and thus to articulate ways in which the writing of women's history necessarily entails the rewriting of everyone's history. By showing that the erasure of women's texts from literary and cultural history was not accidental but was ideologically motivated, the essays explicitly and implicitly contribute to debates surrounding canon formation. Other important topics are women's political activism during the period, antifascism, the contributions made by female journalists, the politics of literary production, genre, women's relationship with and contributions to the avant-garde, women's professional lives, and women's involvement in voluntary associations. In bringing together the work of scholars whose fields of expertise are diverse but whose interests converge on the inter-war period, the volume invites readers to make connections and comparisons across the whole spectrum of women's political, social, and cultural activities throughout Europe.

Women and Socialism, Socialism and Women

Europe Between the Two World Wars

Author: Charles S Baylis Professor of History Helmut Gruber

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 591

View: 297

A pioneering attempt to place the role of women within history during the inter-war years when both women's and socialist movements became prominent, this comparative study includes 11 west European countries.

Women in Europe between the Wars

Politics, Culture and Society

Author: Dr Angela Kershaw

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 266

View: 910

The central aim of this interdisciplinary book is to make visible the intentionality behind the 'forgetting' of European women's contributions during the period between the two world wars in the context of politics, culture and society. It also seeks to record and analyse women's agency in the construction and reconstruction of Europe and its nation states after the First World War, and thus to articulate ways in which the writing of women's history necessarily entails the rewriting of everyone's history. By showing that the erasure of women's texts from literary and cultural history was not accidental but was ideologically motivated, the essays explicitly and implicitly contribute to debates surrounding canon formation. Other important topics are women's political activism during the period, antifascism, the contributions made by female journalists, the politics of literary production, genre, women's relationship with and contributions to the avant-garde, women's professional lives, and women's involvement in voluntary associations. In bringing together the work of scholars whose fields of expertise are diverse but whose interests converge on the inter-war period, the volume invites readers to make connections and comparisons across the whole spectrum of women's political, social, and cultural activities throughout Europe.

Rebel Women Between the Wars

Fearless Writers and Adventurers

Author: Sarah Lonsdale

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 154

An original history of 13 women from the interwar years, who successfully challenged male dominance in a wide range of occupations from mountaineering, to motoring and humanitarian activism. Through their diaries, letters and other personal writings, we see the strategies they used to break free from domesticity and into the active, public world.

France Between the Wars

Gender and Politics

Author: Sian Reynolds

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 762

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Broadcasting Morality

Family Values and the Culture of the Radio in 1930s France

Author: Joelle Neulander

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Families

Page: 297

View: 649

Gale Researcher Guide for: Europe between the Wars: From Peace Settlement to the Brink of War

Author: George Esenwein

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Study Aids

Page: 9

View: 234

Gale Researcher Guide for: Europe between the Wars: From Peace Settlement to the Brink of War is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Women and the Great War

Femininity Under Fire in Italy

Author: Allison Scardino Belzer

Publisher: Italian and Italian American S

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 384

Drawing on both wartime discourse about women and the voices of individual women living at the Italian Front, Allison Belzer analyzes how women participated in the Great War and how it affected them. The Great War transformed women into purveyors and recipients of a new feminine ideal that emphasized their status as national citizens. Although Italian women did not gain the vote, they did encounter a less empowering form of female citizenship just after the war ended with Mussolini’s Fascism. Because of the Great War, many women seized the opportunity to participate in a society that continued to recognize them as guardians of the nation.

Gender and War in Twentieth-Century Eastern Europe

Author: Nancy M. Wingfield

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 885

This volume explores the role of gender on both the home and fighting fronts in eastern Europe during World Wars I and II. By using gender as a category of analysis, the authors seek to arrive at a more nuanced understanding of the subjective nature of wartime experience and its representations. While historians have long equated the fighting front with the masculine and the home front with the feminine, the contributors challenge these dichotomies, demonstrating that they are based on culturally embedded assumptions about heroism and sacrifice. Major themes include the ways in which wartime experiences challenge traditional gender roles; postwar restoration of gender order; collaboration and resistance; the body; and memory and commemoration.

The Family

A Social History of the Twentieth Century

Author: John Harriss

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Families

Page: 256

View: 626

At the turn of the century, most women gave birth in their own homes, often attended only by a midwife or some friends and relatives; as they reached the end of life most people died in the same home they were born in, surrounded by family. Today, vast numbers of people begin and end life in the sterilized, institutional world of hospitals and nursing homes, dying far from where they were born, their families broken by divorce, their lives extended by modern medicine. In no other century have technological and social changes altered private life so dramatically. In a lavishly illustrated, insightfully written account, The Family uncovers the intimate details of private life behind the sweeping events of the twentieth century. Ranging well beyond the Western world, this volume covers the globe, illuminating the living conditions and experiences of families in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, as well as in the formerly socialist countries of the Soviet bloc. The Family also includes explorations of the changing patterns of family life, such as relations between the sexes and attitudes toward children and the old; the nature of work (both in the home and for a wage); and broader questions of social organization and conflict. This volume, edited by John Harriss and consultant editor Charles Webster (Oxford), addresses these issues and more, showing the influence of industrialization, religion, war, migration, education, and advances in medicine on the daily realities of private life. And throughout, scores of informatively captioned photographs and detailed capsule biographies bring the images and personalities of the century to life. Behind the march of armies, the changing tides of national borders, and the boom and bust of economics lies the changing face of private experience, the small but concrete details of family, community, and work. From the effects of urbanization in Japan and Turkey to the new blueprints for society suggested by the Russian revolution, this volume shows how particular cultures have responded to the demands of the modern age, offering a new perspective on the dramatic changes of our times.

Bento Box in the Heartland

My Japanese Girlhood in Whitebread America

Author: Linda Furiya

Publisher: Seal Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 320

View: 965

The syndicated food columnist blends childhood memories, food, and cultural identity in a memoir revealing what life was like in the 1960s for the only Asian American family living in the farming community of Versailles, Indiana.

The Modern Woman Revisited

Paris Between the Wars

Author: Whitney Chadwick

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 259

View: 802

Between the two world wars, Paris served as the setting for unparalleled freedom for expatriate as well as native-born French women, who enjoyed unprecedented access to education and opportunities to participate in public, artistic and intellectual life. Many of these women--including Colette, Tamara de Lempicka, Sonia Delaunay, Djuna Barnes, Augusta Savage, and Lee Miller--made lasting contributions to art and literature.

Women & Gender in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia: Southeastern and East Central Europe

Author: Mary Fleming Zirin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1202

View: 147

This is the first comprehensive, multidisciplinary, and multilingual bibliography on "Women and Gender in East Central Europe and the Balkans (Vol. 1)" and "The Lands of the Former Soviet Union (Vol. 2)" over the past millennium. The coverage encompasses the relevant territories of the Russian, Hapsburg, and Ottoman empires, Germany and Greece, and the Jewish and Roma diasporas. Topics range from legal status and marital customs to economic participation and gender roles, plus unparalleled documentation of women writers and artists, and autobiographical works of all kinds. The volumes include approximately 30,000 bibliographic entries on works published through the end of 2000, as well as web sites and unpublished dissertations. Many of the individual entries are annotated with brief descriptions of major works and the tables of contents for collections and anthologies. The entries are cross-referenced and each volume includes indexes.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Sociology

Page:

View: 290

CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.

Europe in the Era of Two World Wars

From Militarism and Genocide to Civil Society, 1900-1950

Author: Volker R. Berghahn

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 425

How and why did Europe spawn dictatorships and violence in the first half of the twentieth century, and then, after 1945 in the west and after 1989 in the east, create successful civilian societies? In this book, Volker Berghahn explains the rise and fall of the men of violence whose wars and civil wars twice devastated large areas of the European continent and Russia--until, after World War II, Europe adopted a liberal capitalist model of society that had first emerged in the United States, and the beginnings of which the Europeans had experienced in the mid-1920s. Berghahn begins by looking at how the violence perpetrated in Europe's colonial empires boomeranged into Europe, contributing to the millions of casualties on the battlefields of World War I. Next he considers the civil wars of the 1920s and the renewed rise of militarism and violence in the wake of the Great Crash of 1929. The second wave of even more massive violence crested in total war from 1939 to 1945 that killed more civilians than soldiers, and this time included the industrialized murder of millions of innocent men, women, and children in the Holocaust. However, as Berghahn concludes, the alternative vision of organizing a modern industrial society on a civilian basis--in which people peacefully consume mass-produced goods rather than being 'consumed' by mass-produced weapons--had never disappeared. With the United States emerging as the hegemonic power of the West, it was this model that finally prevailed in Western Europe after 1945 and after the end of the Cold War in Eastern Europe as well.

Women's Emancipation Movements in the Nineteenth Century

A European Perspective

Author: Sylvia Paletschek

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 229

Annotation The nineteenth century, a time of far-reaching cultural, political, and socio-economic transformation in Europe, brought about fundamental changes in the role of women. Women achieved this by fighting for their rights in the legal, economic, and political spheres. In the various parts of Europe, this process went forward at different paces and followed different patterns. Most historical research up to now has ignored this diversity, preferring to focus on women's emancipation movements in major western European countries such as Britain and France. The present volume provides a broader context to the movement by including countries, both large and small, from all regions of Europe. Fourteen historians, all of them specialists in women's history, examine the origins and development of women's emancipation movements in their respective areas of expertise. By exploring the cultural and political diversity of nineteenth-century Europe and at the same time pointing out connections to questions explored by conventional scholarship, the essays shed new light on common developments and problems.