Women in American Journalism

A New History

Author: Jan Whitt

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 189

View: 143

The previously untold stories of women throughout the history of journalism

American Journalism

History, Principles, Practices

Author: W. David Sloan

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 243

News consumers made cynical by sensationalist banners—“AMERICA STRIKES BACK,” “THE TERROR OF ANTHRAX”—and lurid leads might be surprised to learn that in 1690, the newspaper Publick Occurrences gossiped about the sexual indiscretions of French royalty or seasoned the story of missing children by adding that “barbarous Indians were lurking about” before the disappearance. Surprising, too, might be the media’s steady adherence to, if continual tugging at, its philosophical and ethical moorings. These 39 essays, written and edited by the nation’s leading professors of journalism, cover the theory and practice of print, radio, and TV news reporting. Politics and partisanship, press and the government, gender and the press corps, presidential coverage, war reportage, technology and news gathering, sensationalism: each subject is treated individually. Appropriate for interested lay persons, students, professors and reporters. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Female War Correspondents in Vietnam

A Turning Point for Women in American Journalism

Author: Natalia J. Haller

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Page: 202

View: 353

Encyclopedia of American Journalism

Author: Stephen L. Vaughn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 664

View: 235

The Encyclopedia of American Journalism explores the distinctions found in print media, radio, television, and the internet. This work seeks to document the role of these different forms of journalism in the formation of America's understanding and reaction to political campaigns, war, peace, protest, slavery, consumer rights, civil rights, immigration, unionism, feminism, environmentalism, globalization, and more. This work also explores the intersections between journalism and other phenomena in American Society, such as law, crime, business, and consumption. The evolution of journalism's ethical standards is discussed, as well as the important libel and defamation trials that have influenced journalistic practice, its legal protection, and legal responsibilities. Topics covered include: Associations and Organizations; Historical Overview and Practice; Individuals; Journalism in American History; Laws, Acts, and Legislation; Print, Broadcast, Newsgroups, and Corporations; Technologies.

Equality on Trial

Gender and Rights in the Modern American Workplace

Author: Katherine Turk

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 982

In 1964, as part of its landmark Civil Rights Act, Congress outlawed workplace discrimination on the basis of such personal attributes as sex, race, and religion. This provision, known as Title VII, laid a new legal foundation for women's rights at work. Though President Kennedy and other lawmakers expressed high hopes for Title VII, early attempts to enforce it were inconsistent. In the absence of a consensus definition of sex equality in the law or society, Title VII's practical meaning was far from certain. The first history to foreground Title VII's sex provision, Equality on Trial examines how the law's initial promise inspired a generation of Americans to dispatch expansive notions of sex equality. Imagining new solidarities and building a broad class politics, these workers and activists engaged Title VII to generate a pivotal battle over the terms of democracy and the role of the state in all labor relationships. But the law's ambiguity also allowed for narrow conceptions of sex equality to take hold. Conservatives found ways to bend Title VII's possible meanings to their benefit, discovering that a narrow definition of sex equality allowed businesses to comply with the law without transforming basic workplace structures or ceding power to workers. These contests to fix the meaning of sex equality ultimately laid the legal and cultural foundation for the neoliberal work regimes that enabled some women to break the glass ceiling as employers lowered the floor for everyone else. Synthesizing the histories of work, social movements, and civil rights in the postwar United States, Equality on Trial recovers the range of protagonists whose struggles forged the contemporary meanings of feminism, fairness, and labor rights.

Encyclopedia of Women in American History

Author: Joyce Appleby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 800

View: 971

This illustrated encyclopedia examines the unique influence and contributions of women in every era of American history, from the colonial period to the present. It not only covers the issues that have had an impact on women, but also traces the influence of women's achievements on society as a whole. Divided into three chronologically arranged volumes, the set includes historical surveys and thematic essays on central issues and political changes affecting women's lives during each period. These are followed by A-Z entries on significant events and social movements, laws, court cases and more, as well as profiles of notable American women from all walks of life and all fields of endeavor. Primary sources and original documents are included throughout.

Women's Press Organizations, 1881-1999

Author: Elizabeth V. Burt

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 348

View: 599

Little has been published about press organizations, and even less about women's press organizations. This book is the first to document the history of women's press organizations. In addition to rich historical accounts of some of these organizations, it also provides a picture of many of the women journalists involved in these press organizations, many of whom were leaders, both in journalism and in the social movements of their time. This book is a description and analysis of forty women's press organizations that have been key to the development of women writers of the press since the first established organization in 1881. Each entry describes the challenges faced by women that brought about the establishment of the organization at that particular time and place, some of the women who played key roles in the group's leadership, the group' s major activities and programs and its contributions to women of the press. The main purpose of these organizations was to provide women with a place where they could discuss professional issues and career strategies at a time when they were largely excluded from or marginalized by male-dominated media institutions. However, many also reflected the interests of some of the social and political reform movements associated with the women's movements of the 19th and 20th centuries, including the woman suffrage, peace, and ERA movements. Although some of the organizations described here no longer exist, new ones have taken on the challenge, in a profession where women still do not have equity.

Biographical Dictionary of American Journalism

Author: Joseph P. McKerns

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Journalism

Page: 820

View: 807

Alphabetically arranged entries provide brief biographical profiles of nearly five hundred men and women who have made significant contributions to American journalism from 1690 to the present.

Beyond Nature's Housekeepers

American Women in Environmental History

Author: Nancy C. Unger

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 840

From pre-Columbian times to the environmental justice movements of the present, women and men frequently responded to the environment and environmental issues in profoundly different ways. Although both environmental history and women's history are flourishing fields, explorations of the synergy produced by the interplay between environment and sex, sexuality, and gender are just beginning. Offering more than biographies of great women in environmental history, Beyond Nature's Housekeepers examines the intersections that shaped women's unique environmental concerns and activism and that framed the way the larger culture responded. Women featured include Native Americans, colonists, enslaved field workers, pioneers, homemakers, municipal housekeepers, immigrants, hunters, nature writers, soil conservationists, scientists, migrant laborers, nuclear protestors, and environmental justice activists. As women, they fared, thought, and acted in ways complicated by social, political, and economic norms, as well as issues of sexuality and childbearing. Nancy C. Unger reveals how women have played a unique role, for better and sometimes for worse, in the shaping of the American environment.

Settling the Borderland

Other Voices in Literary Journalism

Author: Jan Whitt

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 178

View: 322

Settling the Borderland deals with the intimate connection between journalism and literature, both fields in which work by women has been underrepresented. This book has a twin focus: the work of journalists who became some of the greatest novelists, poets, and short-story writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in America, several of whom are men, and contemporary journalists who best exemplify the effective use of literary techniques in news coverage. Although five women are emphasized here (Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty, Joan Didion, Sara Davidson, and Susan Orlean), three men whose work was profoundly influenced by journalism also are included. Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and John Steinbeck are well known as writers of poetry, short stories, and novels, but they, too, are among the "other voices" rarely included in studies of literary journalism. In Settling the Borderland, Jan Whitt presents a thorough analysis of the increasingly indistinct lines between truth and fiction and between fact and creative narrative in contemporary media.