With Liberty and Justice for Some

How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful

Author: Glenn Greenwald

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 909

From "the most important voice to have entered the political discourse in years" (Bill Moyers), a scathing critique of the two-tiered system of justice that has emerged in America From the nation's beginnings, the law was to be the great equalizer in American life, the guarantor of a common set of rules for all. But over the past four decades, the principle of equality before the law has been effectively abolished. Instead, a two-tiered system of justice ensures that the country's political and financial class is virtually immune from prosecution, licensed to act without restraint, while the politically powerless are imprisoned with greater ease and in greater numbers than in any other country in the world. Starting with Watergate, continuing on through the Iran-Contra scandal, and culminating with Obama's shielding of Bush-era officials from prosecution, Glenn Greenwald lays bare the mechanisms that have come to shield the elite from accountability. He shows how the media, both political parties, and the courts have abetted a process that has produced torture, war crimes, domestic spying, and financial fraud. Cogent, sharp, and urgent, this is a no-holds-barred indictment of a profoundly un-American system that sanctions immunity at the top and mercilessness for everyone else.

With Liberty and Justice for All

Author: Ray Cziczo

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 68

View: 234

The final words of the "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag", "With Liberty and Justice for All", are powerful words, as powerful as any words found in any of our national documents. Every day, millions of children say the "Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag" in schools throughout the country. They are words that stir the emotions and inspire individuals to great acts of courage. They are words that inspire patriotism and national spirit. Liberty and Justice often seem elusive. Liberty and Justice mean different things to different people. Many people feel freedom gives them the absolute right to do what they choose without regard to other people. For many people, justice is considered a legal judgement rather than a moral judgement. In the courts, when a judgement has been rendered, the decision may be legally correct, but not "morally" correct. Justice and Liberty are like beauty; they are in the "eyes of the beholder". It is time to reexamine what these words mean and what they should mean.

Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for All. . .

Author: Richard Gloucester

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 164

View: 784

"Offend!" contemporary African American writer Jamaica Kincaid boldly advises Black writers, while Ralph Waldo Emerson almost one hundred and fifty years ago advised: "Speak the rude truth in all its ways." That is what these political poems do, some of which are admittedly experimental. They expose many of the glaring inconsistencies between some of America's cherished slogans, such as: "liberty and justice for all", "truth", "equality", and the harsh realities of life here for millions of America's minority members, her poor, and her homeless. If you are a member of one of America's "less favored" minorities-particularly an African American, do not want comfortable, disengaged, safe poetry about majestic sunsets, cute pond frogs or rhododendrons,and are either politically engaged or at least acutely aware of America's continuing patterns of social injustice, then these poems are definitely for you!

Liberty and Justice for All?

Rethinking Politics in Cold War America

Author: Kathleen G. Donohue

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 196

From the congressional debate over the "fall of China" to the drama of the Army-McCarthy hearings to the kitchen faceoff between Richard Nixon and Nikita Khrushchev, the political history of the early Cold War was long dominated by studies of presidential administrations, anticommunism, and foreign policy. In Liberty and Justice for All? a group of distinguished historians representing a variety of disciplinary perspectives--social history, cultural history, intellectual history, labor history, urban history, women's history, African American studies, and media studies--expand on the political history of the early Cold War by rethinking the relationship between politics and culture. How, for example, did folk music help to keep movement culture alive throughout the 1950s? How did the new medium of television change fundamental assumptions about politics and the electorate? How did American experiences with religion in the 1950s strengthen the separation of church and state? How did race, class, and gender influence the relationship between citizens and the state? These are just some of the questions addressed in this wide-ranging set of essays. In addition to volume editor Kathleen G. Donohue, contributors include Howard Brick, Kari Frederickson, Andrea Friedman, David Greenberg, Grace Elizabeth Hale, Jennifer Klein, Laura McEnaney, Kevin M. Schultz, Jason Scott Smith, Landon R. Y. Storrs, and Jessica Weiss.

E-Mails from the Underworld

I Am Not Who I Am Not

Author: Rev. Thomas F. O'Donnell Esq.

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 221

View: 482

Im mad as Hell, and Im not going to take it any more. So begins Satans autobiography, E-MAILS FROM THE UNDERWORLD: I AM NOT WHO I AM NOT. So long as God remained Out There,a transcendent, superhero who occasionally intervened in human affairs based on no apparent rhyme or reason, Satan was comfortable with the arrangement. God -- Out There. Satan in here. That's the way it was supposed to be. But with the publication of I AM WHO I AM: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF GOD, it's a whole new game. In his mind, Satan, a metaphorical symbol for all the inner demons that keep humankind imprisoned within, has no choice but to come out with his own story. God has laid down the gauntlet; now it is time to respond, he proclaims. Let the best (or worst) deity win. And Satan is a cocky cuss. When it comes to laying claim to an inner presence within, his confidence runneth over. As he himself puts it, Im your inner demons. Im Anger, Envy, Lust, Pride. Im Greed, Impatience, Sloth. Im Judgmentalism, Im Bigotry, Im Stereotyping, Im all the sneaky little -isms and -igotries that allow you humanoids to think youre better than somebody else. You all know Im deep down inside every one of you. The story of Satan is a story of erupting from within. But Satan isnt just going to tell his lifes story, hes going to show it to you. E-mail by e-mail. From tweaking the Beatitudes to the Bad Dude's Baditudes," to offering a new set of Ten Commandments to Hell, Satan takes you on a roller-coaster ride of your own inner demons. By books end, a conscientious reader will have picked up more than enough tricks of the trade to insure a speedy and successful trip to metaphorical Hell (not to mention, of course, the ways to avoid it). (E-MAILS FROM THE UNDERWORLD: I AM NOT WHO I AM NOT is the second of a three part series of autobiographies of God, Satan, and Jesus, respectively. Be sure to complete your own collection of the trilogy with copies of I AM WHO I AM: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF GOD, and I AM THE WORD: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF JESUS.)

Inner Lives

Voices of African American Women In Prison

Author: Paula Johnson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 356

View: 413

The rate of women entering prison has increased nearly 400 percent since 1980, with African American women constituting the largest percentage of this population. However, despite their extremely disproportional representation in correctional institutions, little attention has been paid to their experiences within the criminal justice system. Inner Lives provides readers the rare opportunity to intimately connect with African American women prisoners. By presenting the women's stories in their own voices, Paula C. Johnson captures the reality of those who are in the system, and those who are working to help them. Johnson offers a nuanced and compelling portrait of this fastest-growing prison population by blending legal history, ethnography, sociology, and criminology. These striking and vivid narratives are accompanied by equally compelling arguments by Johnson on how to reform our nation's laws and social policies, in order to eradicate existing inequalities. Her thorough and insightful analysis of the historical and legal background of contemporary criminal law doctrine, sentencing theories, and correctional policies sets the stage for understanding the current system.

Justice for Here and Now

Author: James P. Sterba

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 246

View: 770

A highly original book that develops a new conception of justice deriving from libertarianism.

Children and Childhood in American Religions

Author: Don S. Browning

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 732

Whether First Communion or bar mitzvah, religious traditions play a central role in the lives of many American children. In this collection of essays, leading scholars reveal for the first time how various religions interpret, reconstruct, and mediate their traditions to help guide children and their parents in navigating the opportunities and challenges of American life. The book examines ten religions, among other topics: How the Catholic Church confronts the tension between its teachings about children and actual practic The Oglala Lakota's struggle to preserve their spiritual tradition The impact of modernity on Hinduism Only by discussing the unique challenges faced by all religions, and their followers, can we take the first step toward a greater understanding for all of us.

Bioethics with Liberty and Justice

Themes in the Work of Joseph M. Boyle

Author: Christopher Tollefsen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 261

View: 860

Joseph M. Boyle Jr. has been a major contributor to the development of Catholic bioethics over the past thirty five years. Boyle’s contribution has had an impact on philosophers, theologians, and medical practitioners, and his work has in many ways come to be synonymous with analytically rigorous philosophical bioethics done in the Catholic intellectual tradition. Four main themes stand out as central to Boyle’s contribution: the sanctity of life and bioethics: Boyle has elaborated a view of the ethics of killing at odds with central tenets of the euthanasia mentality, double effect and bioethics: Boyle is among the pre-eminent defenders of a role for double effect in medical decision making and morality, the right to health care: Boyle has moved beyond the rhetoric of social justice to provide a natural law grounding for a political right to health care; and the role of natural law and the natural law tradition in bioethics: Boyle’s arguments have been grounded in a particularly fruitful approach to natural law ethics, the so-called New Natural Law theory. The contributors to BIOETHICS WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE: THEMES IN THE WORK OF JOSEPH M. BOYLE discuss, criticize, and in many cases extend the Boyle’s advances in these areas with rigor and sophistication. It will be of interest to Catholic and philosophical bioethicists alike.

With Liberty for Some

500 Years of Imprisonment in America

Author: Scott Christianson

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 394

View: 538

From Columbus' voyages to the New World through today's prison expansion movements, incarceration has played an important, yet disconcerting, role in American history. In this sweeping examination of imprisonment in the United States over five centuries, Scott Christianson exposes the hidden record of the nation's prison heritage, illuminating the forces underlying the paradox of a country that sanctifies individual liberty while it continues to build and maintain a growing complex of totalitarian institutions. Based on exhaustive research and the author's insider's knowledge of the criminal justice system, With Liberty for Some provides an absorbing, well-written chronicle of imprisonment in its many forms. Interweaving his narrative with the moving, often shocking, personal stories of the prisoners themselves and their keepers, Christianson considers convict transports to the colonies; the international trade in captive indentured servants, slaves, and military conscripts; life under slavery; the transition from colonial jails to model state prisons; the experience of domestic prisoners of war and political prisoners; the creation of the penitentiary; and the evolution of contemporary corrections. His penetrating study of this broad spectrum of confinement reveals that slavery and prisons have been inextricably linked throughout American history. He also examines imprisonment within the context of the larger society. With Liberty for Some is a thought-provoking work that will shed new light on the ways in which imprisonment has shaped the American experience. As the author writes, "Prison is the black flower of civilization -- a durable weed that refuses to die."