Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: Jim Sharpe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 622

With the renewed interest in the history of witches and witchcraft, this timely book provides an introduction to this fascinating topic, informed by the main trends of new thinking on the subject. Beginning with a discussion of witchcraft in the early modern period, and charting the witch panics that took place at this time, the author goes on to look at the historical debate surrounding the causes of the legal persecution of witches. Contemporary views of witchcraft put forward by judges, theological writers and the medical profession are examined, as is the place of witchcraft in the popular imagination. Jim Sharpe also looks at the gender dimensions of the witch persecution, and the treatment of witchcraft in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. Supported by a range of compelling documents, the book concludes with an exploration of why witch panics declined in the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century.

Witchcraft, Witch-Hunting, and Politics in Early Modern England

Author: Peter Elmer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 679

Witchcraft, Witch-hunting, and Politics in Early Modern England constitutes a wide-ranging and original overview of the place of witchcraft and witch-hunting in the broader culture of early modern England. Based on a mass of new evidence extracted from a range of archives, both local and national, it seeks to relate the rise and decline of belief in witchcraft, alongside the legal prosecution of witches, to the wider political culture of the period. Building on the seminal work of scholars such as Stuart Clark, Ian Bostridge, and Jonathan Barry, Peter Elmer demonstrates how learned discussion of witchcraft, as well as the trials of those suspected of the crime, were shaped by religious and political imperatives in the period from the passage of the witchcraft statute of 1563 to the repeal of the various laws on witchcraft. In the process, Elmer sheds new light upon various issues relating to the role of witchcraft in English society, including the problematic relationship between puritanism and witchcraft as well as the process of decline.

Instruments of Darkness

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: James Sharpe

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 465

The first comprehensive scholarly history of witchcraft in England in over eighty years.

Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

Studies in Culture and Belief

Author: Jonathan Barry

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 898

An up-to-date account of the present state of scholarship on early modern European witchcraft.

Instruments of Darkness

Witchcraft in England 1550-1750

Author: J. A. Sharpe

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: England

Page: 364

View: 948

From about 1550 to 1750, witchcraft was a subject of serious intellectual debate, punishable as a crime by the courts, and accepted as a reality at all levels of English society.

Malevolent Nurture

Witch-hunting and Maternal Power in Early Modern England

Author: Deborah Willis

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 264

View: 783

In Malevolent Nurture, Deborah Willis explores the dynamics of witchcraft accusation through legal documents, pamphlet literature, religious tracts, and the plays of Shakespeare.

Witchcraft in England, 1558-1618

Author: Barbara Rosen

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 407

View: 971

Barbara Rosen has gathered and edited a collection of documents - pamphlets, reports, trial accounts, and other material - that describes the experience, interpretation and punishment of witchcraft in the late 16th and early 17th centuries.

Male Witches in Early Modern Europe

Author: Lara Apps

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 190

View: 122

This book critiques historians’ assumptions about witch-hunting as well as their explanations for this complex and perplexing phenomenon. It shows that large numbers of men were accused of witchcraft in their own right, in some regions, more men were accused than women. The authors insist on the centrality of gender, tradition, and ideas about witches in the construction of the witch as a dangerous figure. They challenge the marginalization of male witches by feminist and other historians.

Witchcraft Persecutions in Bavaria

Popular Magic, Religious Zealotry and Reason of State in Early Modern Europe

Author: Wolfgang Behringer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 434

A groundbreaking study of witchcraft in modern-day Bavaria between 1300 and 1800.

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: J. A. Sharpe

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 722

With the renewed interest in the history of witches and witchcraft, this timely book provides an introduction to this fascinating topic, informed by the main trends of new thinking on the subject. Beginning with a discussion of witchcraft in the early modern period, and charting the witch panics that took place at this time, the author goes on to look at the historical debate surrounding the causes of the legal persecution of witches. Contemporary views of witchcraft put forward by judges, theological writers and the medical profession are examined, as is the place of witchcraft in the popular imagination. Jim Sharpe also looks at the gender dimensions of the witch persecution, and the treatment of witchcraft in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. Supported by a range of compelling documents, the book concludes with an exploration of why witch panics declined in the late seventeenth century and early eighteenth century.