Reference Guide to Africa

A Bibliography of Sources

Author: Alfred Kagan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 132

This third edition of the Reference Guide to Africa explains the most important resources for the study of the continent of Africa. It contains a general sources section and a larger disciplinary oriented section. All sources are annotated.

Foreign Relations Library

Basic Collection Guide

Author: United States. Department of State. Division of Library and Reference Services

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: International relations

Page: 56

View: 749

Monthly Bulletin

Author: United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 219

Monthly Bulletin

Author: United States. Department of Agriculture. Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Agriculture

Page:

View: 361

Contains the list of accessions to the library, formerly (1894-1909) issued quarterly in its series of "Bulletins."

The Facts on File Companion to the British Short Story

Author: Andrew Maunder

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 545

View: 320

A comprehensive reference to short fiction from Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Commonwealth. With approximately 450 entries, this A-to-Z guide explores the literary contributions of such writers as Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, D H Lawrence, Rudyard Kipling, Oscar Wilde, Katherine Mansfield, Martin Amis, and others.

Foreign Directories

Author: United States. Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Commerce

Page: 59

View: 427

Library Bulletin

Author: United States. Department of Agriculture. Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 870

The Economy of the Short Story in British Periodicals of the 1890s

Author: Winnie Chan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 715

This materialist study of the short story’s development in three diverse magazines reveals how, at the dawn of modernism, commercial pressures prompted modernist formal innovation in popular magazines, whilst anti-commercial opacity paradoxically formed the basis of an effective marketing strategy that appealed to elitism. Integrating methods of cultural studies with formal analyses, this study builds upon recent work challenging Andreas Huyssen’s provocative formation, the "great divide" of modernism.

George Newnes and the New Journalism in Britain, 1880–1910

Culture and Profit

Author: Kate Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 736

This is a study of the noted newspaper proprietor, publisher and editor, George Newnes and his involvement in the so-called New Journalism in Britain from 1880 to 1910. The author examines seven of Newnes’s most successful periodicals - Tit-Bits (1881), The Strand Magazine (1891), The Million (1892), The Westminster Gazette (1893), The Wide World Magazine (1898), The Ladies’ Field (1898) and The Captain (1899) - from a biographical, journalistic and broader cultural perspective. Newnes assumed a pioneering role in the creation of the penny miscellany paper, the short-story magazine, the true-story magazine and the respectable boys’ paper, in the development of colour printing, magazine illustration and photographic reproduction, and in the redefinition of both political and sporting journalism. His publications were shaped by his own distinctive brand of paternalism, his professional progression within the field of journalism, his liberal-democratic and imperialist beliefs, and his particular skill as an entrepreneur. This innovative periodical publisher utilised the techniques of personalised journalism, commercial promotion and audience targeting to establish an interactive relationship and a strong bond of identification with his many readers. Kate Jackson employs an interdisciplinary approach, building on recent scholarship in the field of periodical research, to demonstrate that Newnes balanced and synthesised various potentially conflicting imperatives to create a kind of synergy between business and benevolence, popular and quality journalism, old and new journalism and , ultimately, culture and profit.

Allusions in Ulysses

An Annotated List

Author: Weldon Thornton

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 554

View: 598

Allusions in Ulysses: An Annotated List

Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature

Chronicles of Disorder

Author: R. B. Kershner

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 817

The sheer mass of allusion to popular literature in the writings of James Joyce is daunting. Using theories developed by Russian critic Mikhail Bakhtin, R. B. Kershner analyzes how Joyce made use of popular literature in such early works as Stephen Hero, Dubliners, A Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, and Exiles. Kershner also examines Joyce's use of rhetoric, the relationship between narrator and protagonist, and the interplay of voices, whether personal, literary, or subliterary, in Joyce's writing. In pointing out the prolific allusions in Joyce to newspapers, children's books, popular novels, and even pornography, Kershner shows how each of these contributes to the structures of consciousness of Joyce's various characters, all of whom write and rewrite themselves in terms of the texts they read in their youth. He also investigates the intertextual role of many popular books to which Joyce alludes in his writings and letters, or which he owned -- some well known, others now obscure. Kershner presents Joyce as a writer with a high degrees of social consciousness, whose writings highlight the conflicting ideologies of the Irish bourgeoisie. In exploring the social dimension of Joyce's writing, he calls upon such important contemporary thinkers as Jameston, Althusser, Barthes, and Lacan in addition to Bakhtin. Joyce's literary response to his historical situation was not polemical, Kershner argues, but, in Bakhtin's terms, dialogical: his writings represent an unremitting dialogue with the discordant but powerful voices of his day, many inaudible to us now. Joyce, Bakhtin, and Popular Literature places Joyce within the social and intellectual context of his time. Through stylistic, social, and ideological analysis, Kersner gives us a fuller grasp of the the complexity of Joyce's earlier writings.

Department Circular

Author: United States. Department of Agriculture

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Agriculture

Page:

View: 669