William Morris & Red House

Author: Jan Marsh

Publisher: National Trust Books

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 159

View: 590

Red House occupies a singular place in British architectural historyit was the first and only house that was built for designer William Morris, and it was the first independent architectural commission for his friend, Philip Webb. The challenge of furnishing the house inspired Morris and his Pre-Raphaelite friends to found the design firm of Morris & Co., which was the flagship for what was to become the Arts & Crafts movement. Because of its illustrious first owner, Red House was never forgotten, and a succession of tenants kept Morris' spirit alive in the house; in 2003, Red House was acquired for the National Trust. This handsome volume provides both the story of Red House and a "virtual tour" that enables the reader to see how this splendid house looked and functioned when it was inhabited by the celebrated designer.

Red House

Bexleyheath 1859

Author: Edward Hollamby

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architect-designed houses

Page: 60

View: 991

The house documented here was designed for William Morris, the founder of the British Arts and Crafts movement by his architect friend Philip Webb in 1858. Its design was heavily influenced by Morris and it is one of the earliest architectural expressions of the Arts and Crafts ideal.

William Morris and the Middle Ages

A Collection of Essays, Together with a Catalogue of Works Exhibited at the Whitworth Art Gallery, 28 September-8 December 1984

Author: Joanna Banham

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 225

View: 329

The Routledge Companion to William Morris

Author: Florence S. Boos

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 540

View: 593

William Morris (1834–96) was an English poet, decorative artist, translator, romance writer, book designer, preservationist, socialist theorist, and political activist, whose admirers have been drawn to the sheer intensity of his artistic endeavors and efforts to live up to radical ideals of social justice. This Companion draws together historical and critical responses to the impressive range of Morris’s multi-faceted life and activities: his homes, travels, family, business practices, decorative artwork, poetry, fantasy romances, translations, political activism, eco-socialism, and book collecting and design. Each chapter provides valuable historical and literary background information, reviews relevant opinions on its subject from the late-nineteenth century to the present, and offers new approaches to important aspects of its topic. Morris’s eclectic methodology and the perennial relevance of his insights and practice make this an essential handbook for those interested in art history, poetry, translation, literature, book design, environmentalism, political activism, and Victorian and utopian studies.

William Morris and his Palace of Art

Architecture, Interiors and Design at Red House

Author: Tessa Wild

Publisher: Philip Wilson Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 567

William Morris and his Palace of Art is a comprehensive new study of Red House, Bexleyheath; the only house commissioned by William Morris and the first independent architectural work of his close friend, Philip Webb. Morris moved in to Red House as an ebullient young man of 26, with an independent income and a head brimming with ideas and the persistent question of ‘how best to live? Red House, together with its Pre-Raphaelite garden, stands as the physical embodiment of his exuberant spirit, youthful ambition, passionate medievalism, creativity and great sense of possibility. For five intense years from 1860–5, it was a place of halcyon days – happy family life, loyal friendship, good humoured competition, and the jovial campaign of decorating; furnishing the house and designing the garden. Drawing on a wealth of new physical evidence, this book argues that Red House constitutes an ambitious and critical chapter in his design history. It will re-consider the inspiration it provided for the founding of ‘the Firm’ of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. (later Morris & Co.), in 1861, and the vital collaboration of Webb, Burne-Jones, Rossetti and their intimate circle in realising Morris’s dream for his house.

William Morris and John Ruskin

A New Road on Which the World Should Travel

Author: The William Morris Society

Publisher: University of Exeter Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page:

View: 926

A wide-ranging collection of essays written for the William Morris Society exploring the various intersections between the life, work and achievements of William Morris (1834-1896) and that of John Ruskin (1819-1900). Subjects covered include Ruskin’s connection with the Pre-Raphaelite movement, the promotion of craft skills and meaningful work, Morris and the division of labour, Ruskin’s engagement with education and the environment, Ruskin and the art and architecture of Red House, the parallels between Ruskin’s support for Laxey Mill and Morris’s Merton Abbey Works, the illustrated manuscript and the contrasts between Ruskin’s Tory paternalism and Morris’s revolutionary socialism. The book includes articles first published in The Journal of William Morris Studies between 1977 and 2012 and new pieces written especially for this volume. Ruskin's beliefs had a profound and lasting impact on Morris who wrote, upon first reading Ruskin whilst at Oxford University, that his views offered a "new road on which the world should travel" - a road that led Morris to social and political change.

The World of Romance

Large Print

Author: William Morris

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 36

View: 549

The World of Romance By William Morris William Morris (24 March 1834 - 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham Set. After university he trained as an architect, married Jane Burden, and developed close friendships with the Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with the Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed a family home, Red House, then in Kent, where the latter lived from 1859 to 1865, before relocating to Bloomsbury, central London. In 1861, Morris founded a decorative arts firm with Burne-Jones, Rossetti, Webb, and others: the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. Becoming highly fashionable and much in demand, the firm profoundly influenced interior decoration throughout the Victorian period, with Morris designing tapestries, wallpaper, fabrics, furniture, and stained glass windows. In 1875, Morris assumed total control of the company, which was renamed Morris & Co. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

The Letters of Philip Webb

Author: John Aplin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 404

View: 244

Philip Webb was a British architect known as a founder of the Arts and Crafts movement and also a key member of the Pre-Raphaelite circle. He had a long association with William Morris and was responsible for the design of the hugely influential Red House, Morris’s first home. Webb's letters will be of interest to art and architecture historians.

The Letters of Philip Webb

Author: John Aplin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 330

View: 540

Philip Webb was a British architect known as a founder of the Arts and Crafts movement and also a key member of the Pre-Raphaelite circle. He had a long association with William Morris and was responsible for the design of the hugely influential Red House, Morris’s first home. Webb's letters will be of interest to art and architecture historians.

William Morris

Design and Enterprise in Victorian Britain

Author: Charles Harvey

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 257

View: 568

The many achievements of William Morris are described in this volume, which explores his multifaceted career as a political writer and activist, an artist and designer, a man of letters, and a successful businessman.

The Letters of Philip Webb, Volume IV

Author: John Aplin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 360

View: 315

Philip Webb was a British architect known as a founder of the Arts and Crafts movement and also a key member of the Pre-Raphaelite circle. He had a long association with William Morris and was responsible for the design of the hugely influential Red House, Morris’s first home. Webb's letters will be of interest to art and architecture historians.

The House of the Wolfings (1889). By: William Morris

Fantasy Novel (Original Classics)

Author: William Morris

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 138

View: 300

A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first modern fantasy writer to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus the precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature. It was first published in hardcover by Reeves and Turner in 1889.The book influenced J. R. R. Tolkien's popular The Lord of the Rings. Plot The House of the Wolfings is a romantically reconstructed portrait of the lives of the Germanic Gothic tribes, written in an archaic style and incorporating a large amount of poetry. Morris combines his own idealistic views with what was actually known at the time of his subjects' folkways and language. He portrays them as simple and hardworking, galvanized into heroic action to defend their families and liberty by the attacks of imperial Rome. Morris's Goths inhabit an area called the Mark on a river in the forest of Mirkwood, divided into the Upper-mark, the Mid-mark and the Nether-mark. They worship their gods Odin and Tyr by sacrificing horses, and rely on seers who foretell the future and serve as psychic news-gatherers. The men of the Mark choose two War Dukes to lead them against their enemies, one each from the House of the Wolfings and the House of the Laxings. The Wolfing war leader is Thiodolf, a man of mysterious and perhaps divine antecedents, whose ability to lead is threatened by his possession of a magnificent dwarf-made mail-shirt which, unknown to him, is cursed. He is supported by his lover the Wood Sun and their daughter the Hall Sun, who are related to the gods....... William Morris (24 March 1834 - 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham Set. After university, he trained as an architect, married Jane Burden, and developed close friendships with the Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with the Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed a family home, Red House, then in Kent, where the latter lived from 1859 to 1865, before moving to Bloomsbury, central London. In 1861, Morris founded a decorative arts firm with Burne-Jones, Rossetti, Webb, and others: the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. Becoming highly fashionable and much in demand, the firm profoundly influenced interior decoration throughout the Victorian period, with Morris designing tapestries, wallpaper, fabrics, furniture, and stained glass windows. In 1875, Morris assumed total control of the company, which was renamed Morris & Co. Although retaining a main home in London, from 1871 Morris rented the rural retreat of Kelmscott Manor, Oxfordshire. Greatly influenced by visits to Iceland, with Eiríkr Magnússon he produced a series of English-language translations of Icelandic Sagas. He also achieved success with the publication of his epic poems and novels, namely The Earthly Paradise (1868-1870), A Dream of John Ball (1888), the utopian News from Nowhere (1890), and the fantasy romance The Well at the World's End (1896).....

Encyclopedia of Architectural and Engineering Feats

Author: Donald Langmead

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 388

View: 345

Encyclopedia of Architectural and Engineering Feats presents more than 200 achievements in architecture and structural engineering in all the inhabited continents, from prehistory to the present. * 200+ A–Z, fully cross-referenced entries on fascinating structures such as Angkor Wat, a Cambodian temple complex that remains the largest religious monument ever constructed * A wealth of illustrations covering diverse topics such as dams, agrarian terracing, cathedrals, temples, bridges, monuments, palaces, skyscrapers, aqueducts, and highway systems * Numerous photographs of world famous structures such as the Taj Mahal and the Pont du Gard, and lesser known wonders such as Nazca Lines in Peru depicting a 300 foot long monkey * A glossary of explanations for many architectural and engineering terms used around the globe

Poems by the Way By: William Morris

Poems (World's Classic's)

Author: William Morris

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 78

View: 751

William Morris (24 March 1834 - 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham Set. After university, he trained as an architect, married Jane Burden, and developed close friendships with the Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with the Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed a family home, Red House, then in Kent, where the latter lived from 1859 to 1865, before moving to Bloomsbury, central London. In 1861, Morris founded a decorative arts firm with Burne-Jones, Rossetti, Webb, and others: the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. Becoming highly fashionable and much in demand, the firm profoundly influenced interior decoration throughout the Victorian period, with Morris designing tapestries, wallpaper, fabrics, furniture, and stained glass windows. In 1875, Morris assumed total control of the company, which was renamed Morris & Co. Although retaining a main home in London, from 1871 Morris rented the rural retreat of Kelmscott Manor, Oxfordshire. Greatly influenced by visits to Iceland, with Eiríkr Magnússon he produced a series of English-language translations of Icelandic Sagas. He also achieved success with the publication of his epic poems and novels, namely The Earthly Paradise (1868-1870), A Dream of John Ball (1888), the utopian News from Nowhere (1890), and the fantasy romance The Well at the World's End (1896). In 1877 he founded the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings to campaign against the damage caused by architectural restoration. Embracing Marxism and influenced by anarchism, in the 1880s Morris became a committed revolutionary socialist activist; after an involvement in the Social Democratic Federation (SDF), he founded the Socialist League in 1884, but broke with that organization in 1890. In 1891 he founded the Kelmscott Press to publish limited-edition, illuminated-style print books, a cause to which he devoted his final years. Morris is recognised as one of the most significant cultural figures of Victorian Britain; though best known in his lifetime as a poet, he posthumously became better known for his designs. Founded in 1955, the William Morris Society is devoted to his legacy, while multiple biographies and studies of his work have seen publication. Many of the buildings associated with his life are open to visitors, much of his work can be found in art galleries and museums, and his designs are still in production.

Historic Arts & Crafts Homes of Great Britain

Author: Brian D. Coleman

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 159

View: 752

From esteemed author Brian D. Coleman comes a thorough exploration into the origins of the design and philosophy of the Arts & Crafts movement in Great Britain--the roots of which are inspiring a fresh new approach to the more traditional American Arts & Crafts style. Coleman leads an inspiring and beautiful tour of ten of the most historic Arts & Crafts homes in Britain, from William Morris's Red House in England to Macintosh's Hill House in Scotland. BR

Arts & Crafts Furniture

From Classic to Contemporary

Author: Kevin P. Rodel

Publisher: Taunton Press

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 234

View: 371

Examines the history and influences of arts and crafts furniture, from the foundation of the movement to the present, and includes illustrated examples of the style.

The Water of the Wondrous Isles. By: William Morris (Complete Set Volume I and II).

Fantasy Novel (Complete).

Author: William Morris

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 232

View: 354

The Water of the Wondrous Isles is a fantasy novel by William Morris, perhaps the first writer of modern fantasy to unite an imaginary world with the element of the supernatural, and thus a precursor of much of present-day fantasy literature.[1] It was first printed in 1897 by Morris' own Kelmscott Press on vellum and artisanal paper in a blackletter type of his own design. For the wider reading public, a hardcover trade edition was published later that year by Longmans, Green and Co. The novel was republished by Ballantine Books as the thirty-eighth volume of the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in November, 1971. The Ballantine edition includes an introduction by Lin Carter. Morris considered his fantasies a revival of the medieval tradition of chivalrous romances; in consequence, they tend to have sprawling plots of strung-together adventures. These prose romances were written in a mock-Medieval style that modern readers may find arduous and fustian. Plot summary: Stolen as a child and raised in the wood of Evilshaw as servant to a witch, Birdalone ultimately escapes in her captress's magical boat, in which she travels to a succession of strange and wonderful islands. Among these is the Isle of Increase Unsought, an island cursed with boundless production, which Morris intended as a parable of contemporary Britain and a vehicle for his socialistic beliefs. Equally radical, during much of the first quarter of the novel, Birdalone is naked, a highly unusual detail in Victorian fiction. She is occasionally assisted out of jams by Habundia, her lookalike fairy godmother. She encounters three maidens who are held prisoner by another witch. They await deliverance by their lovers, the three paladins of the Castle of the Quest. Birdalone is clad by the maidens and seeks out their heroes, and the story goes into high gear as they set out to rescue the women. Ultimately, one lady is reunited with her knight, another finds a new love when her knight is killed, and the last is left to mourn as her champion throws her over for Birdalone............ William Morris (24 March 1834 - 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham Set. After university, he trained as an architect, married Jane Burden, and developed close friendships with the Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with the Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed a family home, Red House, then in Kent, where the latter lived from 1859 to 1865, before moving to Bloomsbury, central London. In 1861, Morris founded a decorative arts firm with Burne-Jones, Rossetti, Webb, and others: the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. Becoming highly fashionable and much in demand, the firm profoundly influenced interior decoration throughout the Victorian period, with Morris designing tapestries, wallpaper, fabrics, furniture, and stained glass windows. In 1875, Morris assumed total control of the company, which was renamed Morris & Co.............

William Morris

Centenary Essays ; Papers from the Morris Centenary Conference Organized by the William Morris Society at Exeter College Oxford, 30 June - 3 July 1996

Author: Morris Centenary Conference (1996 Exeter College Oxford)

Publisher: University of Exeter Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 298

View: 792

This well illustrated book celebrates every aspect of the wide-ranging achievements of William Morris - writer, designer, cultural critic, revolutionary socialist - with particular emphasis on their relevance to our own times. The book makes available up-to-date Morris scholarship in accessible form. Written by a group of international scholars who took part in a conference marking the centenary of the death of Morris in 1896, the book has sections devoted to Morris and Literature (covering texts from The Earthly Paradise to the late romances); Morris, the Arts & Crafts and the New World (including discussions of his influence in Rhode Island, Boston, Ontario and New Zealand); and Morris, Gender and Politics (with fresh consideration of his relation to Victorian ideas of manliness and of the particular qualities of his anti-statist politics). The latter section also draws attention to a hitherto unknown play by Morris's daughter May and concludes with an account of his biographer, the late E.P. Thompson.