Why Read Moby-Dick?

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 139

A “brilliant and provocative” (The New Yorker) celebration of Melville’s masterpiece—from the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Valiant Ambition, and In the Hurricane's Eye One of the greatest American novels finds its perfect contemporary champion in Why Read Moby-Dick?, Nathaniel Philbrick’s enlightening and entertaining tour through Melville’s classic. As he did in his National Book Award–winning bestseller In the Heart of the Sea, Philbrick brings a sailor’s eye and an adventurer’s passion to unfolding the story behind an epic American journey. He skillfully navigates Melville’s world and illuminates the book’s humor and unforgettable characters—finding the thread that binds Ishmael and Ahab to our own time and, indeed, to all times. An ideal match between author and subject, Why Read Moby-Dick? will start conversations, inspire arguments, and make a powerful case that this classic tale waits to be discovered anew. “Gracefully written [with an] infectious enthusiasm…”—New York Times Book Review

Moby Dick

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Adventure stories

Page: 545

View: 214

A literary classic that wasn't recognized for its merits until decades after its publication, Herman Melville's Moby-Dick tells the tale of a whaling ship and its crew, who are carried progressively further out to sea by the fiery Captain Ahab. Obsessed with killing the massive whale, which had previously bitten off Ahab's leg, the seasoned seafarer steers his ship to confront the creature, while the rest of the shipmates, including the young narrator, Ishmael, and the harpoon expert, Queequeg, must contend with their increasingly dire journey. The book invariably lands on any short list of the greatest American novels.

Moby-Dick

or, The Whale

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 546

View: 518

“Moby-Dick; or, The Whale” is an 1851 novel written by American author Herman Melville. The story is told by Ishmael, a sailor aboard a whaling ship captained by Ahab who embarks on an obsessive quest for revenge against a giant sperm whale that bit off his leg on a previous voyage. Originally receiving mixed reviews, “Moby Dick” was a failure when first published and was no longer in print when Melvillie died in 1891. Today, however, it is considered a “Great American Novel” known the world over. “Moby-Dick; or, The Whale” is highly recommended for all lovers of literature and deserves a place on every bookshelf. Herman Melville (1819–1891) was an American short story writer, poet, and novelist during the American Renaissance period. Other notable works by this author include: “Typee” (1846), "Bartleby, the Scrivener" (1853), and “The Encantadas” (1854). Read & Co. Classics is republishing this classic novel now complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

Moby-Dick

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 706

View: 558

Moby-Dick is arguably the definitive American epic. Yet its epic proportions disguise the fact that its plot is little more than the scantiest of scaffolding erected to support Melville's desire for philosophical exploration. As such, the novel has baffled many readers from the time of its initial publication in 1851 to the present day. Yet the questions that the novel asks continue to be as relevant today as they were in the days of America's antebellum infancy. Is the naà ̄ve optimism of romantic idealism an adequate explanation for, or defense against, the reality of evil? Is American individualism a freedom to be cherished and guarded or is it a tragic weakness at the heart of American culture, presaging disaster? This critical edition of one of the greatest American novels tackles the mysteries at the heart of Melville's quest for meaning in a dark and darkening world. The Ignatius Critical Editions series represents a tradition-oriented approach to reading the Classics of world literature. While many modern critical editions have succumbed to the fads of modernism and post-modernism, this series concentrates on critical examinations informed by our Judeo-Christian heritage as passed down through the ages-the same heritage that provided the crucible in which the great authors formed these classic works. Edited by acclaimed literary biographer Joseph Pearce, the Ignatius Critical Editions ensure that readings of the works are filtered through the richness of Western tradition, meeting the authors in their element, instead of the currently popular method of deconstructing a classic to fit a modern mindset-a lamentable flaw that often proliferates in other series of critical editions. The series is ideal for anyone wishing to understand the great Works of Western Civilization, enabling the modern reader to enjoy these classics in the company of some of the finest literature professors alive today. Book jacket.

Moby Dick in Plain and Simple English (Includes Study Guide, Complete Unabridged Book, Historical Context, and Character Index)(

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 612

An obsessed and insane captain leads his crew into dangerous waters. A young man, eager to go to sea and forget his problems, signs on with a whaling ship for the first time. A savage islander shows what it means to be brave, strong, and compassionate. A mighty white whale haunts the dreams of every whaler in the four oceans. These are the things you can expect to read in the American maritime classic, Moby Dick…but if you are like many readers, you might need a little help with Melville’s classic epic. Along with chapter-by-chapter summaries and analysis, this book features the full text of Melville’s classic novel is also included. BookCap Study Guides are not meant to be purchased as alternatives to reading the book.

Moby Dick - Large Print Edition

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 792

View: 252

Herman Melville's classic Great American Novel, Moby Dick, is presented here in 16 point easy-to-read type. If your eyes aren't what they should be, this is the edition for you. Experience Captain Ahab's quest for the great white whale!

The Condensed Moby Dick (Herman Melville's Classic Abridged)

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 90

View: 620

This book is annotated. Moby Dick is one of the greatest American novels ever wrote. If you've always wanted to read the classic, but just don't have the time, this abridged version can help. At just 20,000 words long, this version of the classic novel will let you read Melville's classic in just hours, and provide you with an excellent overview of the entire novel. The story tells the adventures of the wandering sailor Ishmael, and his voyage on the whaleship Pequod, commanded by Captain Ahab. Ishmael soon learns that Ahab seeks one specific whale: Moby Dick, a ferocious, enigmatic white sperm whale. In a previous encounter, the whale destroyed Ahab's boat and bit off his leg. Ahab intends to take revenge.

Two Guys Read Moby-Dick

Author: Steve Chandler

Publisher: Robert Reed Pub

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 120

View: 451

In 1960, two high school friends were assigned to read the Herman Melville novel Moby-Dick. Neither one of them read it. Four decades later, plagued by feelings of guilt at never having read The Great American Novel, the two friends grab for belated gusto. Over the six months of their reading odyssey, the authors wrote a series of letters and e-mails chronicling their experience and encouraging each other's progress. This body of correspondence is now a book. Actually, the reading of Moby-Dick is just a platform. And while it is the primary substance of the book, the writers do not worry themselves much about staying within subject matter boundaries. The letters also touch on: their fifty-year friendship, growing old, Alex Rodriguez, the War in Iraq, Bob Dylan, speculation on the chances of getting sick in Mexico, the true story of how Hemingway got to Sweden, the cause of nightmares, Bebe Rebozo, Vladimir Nabokov, redemption and death. TWO GUYS READ MOBY-DICK will have you laughing from start to finish, and pondering life's many mysteries, of course!

Moby Dick the Complete & Unabridged Original Classic

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 416

View: 332

This premium quality edition contains the complete and unabridged original classic version of "Moby Dick," printed on heavyweight, bright white paper in a large 7.44"x9.69" format, with a laminated cover featuring an original design. Also included is a detailed introductory essay discussing the life and work of Herman Melville and the history and significance of "Moby Dick," providing the modern reader with useful background information to enhance the enjoyment of this classic. Herman Melville is known today primarily for his iconic whaling novel, "Moby Dick" (1851), the story of the struggle between Captain Ahab and "the great white whale," which appears on many lists of "greatest books ever written" and is considered an essential part of the Western Canon. Ironically, when the novel was published it was a monumental flop and signaled the end of Melvilles's career as a novelist. One theory is that the omission of the epilogue from the first printing left the book open to ridicule as a first-person narrative in which the narrator did not survive to tell the tale. He published several more novels, all without success, and in 1866 became a New York customs inspector, all but forgotten for the next fifty years. It was not until the rise of the modernist movement that "Moby Dick" was recognized as a great literary work. What once were regarded as serious flaws came to be viewed as literary innovations, and the novel went from being criticized as undisciplined and poorly crafted to being hailed as "ahead of its time" and "visionary." For the modern reader, the complex analytical theories behind "Moby Dick" may get in the way of enjoying the novel for its own sake. Taking "Moby Dick" at face value, it is an interesting tale, rich with diverse characters and evocative themes like friendship, class and social status, good and evil, isolation and community, the existence of God, obsession and human perception. A vivid depiction of life aboard ship in the nineteenth century it is perhaps the most detailed and accessible existing picture of what was, for a time, the richest industry in the United States. If at times the text seems stilted or antiquated, as might be expected from any work from this era, it is equally true that at times the text attains a soaring, almost lyric tone. The most casual reader cannot fail to appreciate the unforgettable characters, compelling storyline and vivid depictions of whales, whalers and whaling, and the obsession-driven quest after the great white whale upon which Ahab leads, and the crew follows, to their doom. And this, without anything more, makes Moby Dick essential reading. Herman Melville (1819-1891) was an author of the American Renaissance, or Romantic, period. Born in New York City, he was the third child of a successful merchant. He worked as a schoolteacher before going to sea for the first time in 1839. Serving on a whaler in 1842, he jumped ship and spent a month living among South Pacific islanders. His first novel, "Typee" (1846), a bestseller, was based in part on his experiences in the South Pacific as was the successful sequel, "Omoo" (1847). The same year Melville, now a successful novelist, married Elizabeth Knapp Shaw. They would have four children between 1849 and 1855. "Mardi" and "Redburn," both published in 1849, met with limited success. "Mardi" in particular was criticized as so thematically dense as to be incomprehensible. "White-Jacket" (1850), based on Melville's brief service in the U.S. Navy, was his most influential work during his lifetime, with graphic descriptions of flogging that led directly to banning the practice on naval vessels. "Moby Dick" and several additional failed novels and poetry collections followed. Melville sank into obscurity and died in 1891, about 20 years before "Moby Dick" was recognized as a literary classic.

Beauty and Horror in Nature in "Moby Dick"

Notions of (Anti-)Transcendentalism in Melville's Ishmael

Author: Tolga Konmus

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 28

View: 440

Seminar paper from the year 2018 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Mannheim (Anglistik), course: Moby Dick, language: English, abstract: In this paper I want to focus on the main character and narrator of the book "Moby Dick", especially on his reported thoughts and impressions on Transcendentalist key aspects go get to the bottom of whether there is a clear inclination towards or away from Transcendentalist ideas. When Herman Melville had written and released "Moby Dick" in 1851, Transcendentalism reached its peak in the United States. It is safe to say that Melville had not been totally isolated from the effect of this new movement and had formed an opinion on it. In spite of the temporal simultaneity, "when he wrote Moby-Dick Melville had not read Emerson. He had merely attended one of his lectures." Nevertheless, this one lecture gave him enough incentive to write a letter to Evert Duykinck nineteen days after the lecture, telling him about he felt about Emerson. In this letter, Melville "rejects the notion that he might be a follower of the Transcendentalist camp", but finds him a peculiar man nevertheless: "there is a something about every man elevated above mediocrity, which is, for the most part, instinctualy perceptible. This I see in Mr. Emerson". In a pictorial description, Melville thinks Emerson capable of deeper thought and compares him to a whale descending great depths, acknowledging his skills, in contrast to other fish which are only able to swim closely to the surface. Hoffmann says that "Melville admires the figure Emerson cuts, not the word he utters" which is a pretty ambivalent statement to give. Melville also mentions in his letter a "gaping flaw" he had seen in Emerson. According to Hoffmann, Melville was bothered by the "high presumptuousness" Emerson displayed, "a feeling that had he been around when the world was created he could have given God some good advice-perhaps even taken His place". It is

Moby-Dick

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 736

View: 221

This Norton Critical Edition includes:* Melville's classic novel of whaling and revenge, based on Hershel Parker's revision of the 1967 text edited by Harrison Hayford and Hershel Parker.* Twenty-six illustrations, including maps, contemporary engravings, and diagrams of whaleboat rigging.* Background and source materials centering on whaling and whalecraft, Melville's international reception, the inspirations for Moby-Dick, and Melville's related correspondence.* Forty-four reviews and interpretations of the novel spanning three centuries.* A revised and updated Selected Bibliography.About the SeriesRead by more than 12 million students over fifty-five years, Norton Critical Editions set the standard for apparatus that is right for undergraduate readers. The three-part format--annotated text, contexts, and criticism--helps students to better understand, analyze, and appreciate the literature, while opening a wide range of teaching possibilities for instructors. Whether in print or in digital format, Norton Critical Editions provide all the resources students need.

Moby Dick; Or, the Whale

Author: By Herman Melville

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 584

View: 578

The Salt-sea Mastodon

A Reading of Moby-Dick

Author: Robert Zoellner

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Sea stories, American

Page: 288

View: 911

Moby Dick

Easy to Read Classics

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: EDCON Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 691

Bring The Classics To Life Series. These novels have been adapted into 10 short chapters that will excite the reluctant reader as well as the enthusiastic one. Let the Classics introduce Kipling, Stevenson, and H.G. Wells. Readers will embrace the notion of Crusoe's lonely reflections, the psychological reactions of a Civil War soldier at Chancellorsville, and the tragedy of the Jacobite Cause in 18th Century Scotland. Knowledge of Classics is a cultural necessity and these will improve fluency, vocabulary and comprehension through a high Interest / low readability format. Each eBook is divided into 10 short high quality illustrated chapters - Was written using McGraw-Hill's Core Vocabulary - Has been measured by the Fry Readability Formula - Defines and uses in context new vocabulary, prior to each chapter.

Penguin Readers Level 7: Moby Dick

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher: Penguin Readers

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 112

View: 982

Penguin Readers is an ELT graded reader series for learners of English as a foreign language. With carefully adapted text, new illustrations and language learning exercises, the print edition also includes instructions to access supporting material online. Titles include popular classics, exciting contemporary fiction, and thought-provoking non-fiction, introducing language learners to bestselling authors and compelling content. The eight levels of Penguin Readers follow the Common European Framework of Reference for language learning (CEFR). Exercises at the back of each Reader help language learners to practise grammar, vocabulary, and key exam skills. Before, during and after-reading questions test readers' story comprehension and develop vocabulary. Visit the Penguin Readers website Exclusively with the print edition, readers can unlock online resources including a digital book, audio edition, lesson plans and answer keys. When the young sailor "Ishmael" decides to sail on the Pequod with the mysterious Captain Ahab, he has no idea about Ahab's plans to get revenge on the great white whale Moby Dick. Ahab wants to find and kill the whale at any cost - even if it means losing his ship and his crew.

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 310

View: 778

Unabridged & Uncensored. Moby Dick, a novel by Herman Melville, published in London in October 1851 as The Whale and a month later in New York City as Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. It is dedicated to Nathaniel Hawthorne. Moby Dick is generally regarded as Melville's magnum opus and one of the greatest American novels. Moby Dick famously begins with the narratorial invocation "Call me Ishmael." The narrator, like his biblical counterpart, is an outcast. Ishmael, who turns to the sea for meaning, relays to the audience the final voyage of the Pequod, a whaling vessel. Amid a story of tribulation, beauty, and madness, the reader is introduced to a number of characters, many of whom have names with religious resonance. The ship's captain is Ahab, who Ishmael and his friend Queequeg soon learn is losing his mind. Starbuck, Ahab's first-mate, recognizes this problem too, and is the only one throughout the novel to voice his disapproval of Ahab's increasingly obsessive behavior. This nature of Ahab's obsession is first revealed to Ishmael and Queequeg after the Pequod's owners, Peleg and Bildad, explain to them that Ahab is still recovering from an encounter with a large whale that resulted in the loss of his leg. That whale's name is Moby Dick. The Pequod sets sail, and the crew is soon informed that this journey will be unlike their other whaling missions: this time, despite the reluctance of Starbuck, Ahab intends to hunt and kill the beastly Moby Dick no matter the cost. Moby Dick can sustain numerous, if not seemingly infinite, readings generated by multiple interpretative approaches. One of the most fruitful ways to appreciate the novel's complexity is through the names that Melville gave to its characters, many of which are shared with figures of the Abrahamic religions. The very first line of Moby Dick, for instance, identifies Ishmael as the narrator; Ishmael was the illegitimate (in terms of the Covenant) son of Abraham and was cast away after Isaac was born. There are a number of other Abrahamic names in the book as well, including Ahab--who, according to the Hebrew Bible, was an evil king who led the Israelites into a life of idolatry. Melville's Ahab is ob­sessed with Moby Dick, an idol that causes the death of his crew. The ship that saves Ishmael, the Rachel, is named for the mother of Joseph, known for interceding to protect her children. It is Rachel, as depicted in the Book of Jeremiah, who convinced God to end the exile placed upon the Jewish tribes for idolatry. The rescue of Ishmael by the Rachel in Moby Dick can thus be read as his return from an exile caused by his complicity (because he was on the Pequod's crew) in Ahab's idolatry of the whale. Melville's use of these names grants his novel a rich layer of additional meaning. The whale itself is perhaps the most striking symbol in Moby Dick, and interpretations of its meaning range from the Judeo-Christian God to atheism and everything in between. Between the passages of carefully detailed cetology, the epigraphs, and the shift from a hero's quest narrative to a tragedy, Melville set the stage for purposeful ambiguity. The novel's ability to produce numerous interpretations is, perhaps, the main reason it is considered one of the greatest American novels. Melville himself was well versed in whaling, as he had spent some time aboard the Acushnet, a whaling vessel, which gave him firsthand experience. He also did tremendous amounts of research, consulting a number of scientific sources as well as accounts of historical events that he incorporated into Moby Dick.

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Author: Herman Melville

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 310

View: 951

Unabridged & Uncensored. Moby Dick, a novel by Herman Melville, published in London in October 1851 as The Whale and a month later in New York City as Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. It is dedicated to Nathaniel Hawthorne. Moby Dick is generally regarded as Melville's magnum opus and one of the greatest American novels. Moby Dick famously begins with the narratorial invocation "Call me Ishmael." The narrator, like his biblical counterpart, is an outcast. Ishmael, who turns to the sea for meaning, relays to the audience the final voyage of the Pequod, a whaling vessel. Amid a story of tribulation, beauty, and madness, the reader is introduced to a number of characters, many of whom have names with religious resonance. The ship's captain is Ahab, who Ishmael and his friend Queequeg soon learn is losing his mind. Starbuck, Ahab's first-mate, recognizes this problem too, and is the only one throughout the novel to voice his disapproval of Ahab's increasingly obsessive behavior. This nature of Ahab's obsession is first revealed to Ishmael and Queequeg after the Pequod's owners, Peleg and Bildad, explain to them that Ahab is still recovering from an encounter with a large whale that resulted in the loss of his leg. That whale's name is Moby Dick. The Pequod sets sail, and the crew is soon informed that this journey will be unlike their other whaling missions: this time, despite the reluctance of Starbuck, Ahab intends to hunt and kill the beastly Moby Dick no matter the cost. Moby Dick can sustain numerous, if not seemingly infinite, readings generated by multiple interpretative approaches. One of the most fruitful ways to appreciate the novel's complexity is through the names that Melville gave to its characters, many of which are shared with figures of the Abrahamic religions. The very first line of Moby Dick, for instance, identifies Ishmael as the narrator; Ishmael was the illegitimate (in terms of the Covenant) son of Abraham and was cast away after Isaac was born. There are a number of other Abrahamic names in the book as well, including Ahab--who, according to the Hebrew Bible, was an evil king who led the Israelites into a life of idolatry. Melville's Ahab is ob­sessed with Moby Dick, an idol that causes the death of his crew. The ship that saves Ishmael, the Rachel, is named for the mother of Joseph, known for interceding to protect her children. It is Rachel, as depicted in the Book of Jeremiah, who convinced God to end the exile placed upon the Jewish tribes for idolatry. The rescue of Ishmael by the Rachel in Moby Dick can thus be read as his return from an exile caused by his complicity (because he was on the Pequod's crew) in Ahab's idolatry of the whale. Melville's use of these names grants his novel a rich layer of additional meaning. The whale itself is perhaps the most striking symbol in Moby Dick, and interpretations of its meaning range from the Judeo-Christian God to atheism and everything in between. Between the passages of carefully detailed cetology, the epigraphs, and the shift from a hero's quest narrative to a tragedy, Melville set the stage for purposeful ambiguity. The novel's ability to produce numerous interpretations is, perhaps, the main reason it is considered one of the greatest American novels. Melville himself was well versed in whaling, as he had spent some time aboard the Acushnet, a whaling vessel, which gave him firsthand experience. He also did tremendous amounts of research, consulting a number of scientific sources as well as accounts of historical events that he incorporated into Moby Dick.

Moby Dick

activity book : exercises

Author: Graham Read

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 152

Moby-Dick (Illustrated Classic)

Author: Jan Needle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ahab, Captain (Fictitious character)

Page: 182

View: 781

An abridgement of the nineteenth-century novel in which a young seaman joins the crew of the whaling ship Pequod whose fanatical Captain Ahab is in determined pursuit of the white whale Moby Dick. Segments of the original text are supported by commentaries from Jan Needle. Suggested level: primary, intermediate, junior secondary.