Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

A Play

Author: Edward Albee

Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 115

View: 318

THE STORY: George, a professor at a small college, and his wife, Martha, have just returned home, drunk from a Saturday night party. Martha announces, amidst general profanity, that she has invited a young couple--an opportunistic new professor at t

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

A Play

Author: Edward Albee

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 243

View: 580

A social event becomes a personal challenge for two faculty members and their wives at a small New England college as their inner fears and desires are exposed.

Virginia Woolf Icon

Author: Brenda R. Silver

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 353

View: 444

The proliferation of Virginia Woolfs in both high and popular culture, she argues, has transformed the writer into a "star" whose image and authority are persistently claimed or challenged in debates about art, politics, gender, the canon, class, feminism, and fashion."--BOOK JACKET.

Text

An Interdisciplinary Annual of Textual Studies

Author: W. S. Hillis

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 553

TEXT 12 brings a substantial focus on international perspectives on textual theory and practice, with essays including Pierre-Marc De Biasi's examination of the questions surrounding manuscript editions, "Editing Manuscripts: Toward a Typology of Recent French Genetic Editions, 1980-1995" and Alberto Varvaro's "The 'New Philology' from the Italian Perspective" as well as Bodo Plachta's discussion of questions in German scholarly editing. Other highlights include Kathryn Sutherland's investigation of the importance of punctuation to meaning, using Jane Austen's Mansfield Park as a case study and Andrew Durking's exploration "The Self-Playing Piano as a Site for Textual Criticism." Review essays and book reviews in this volume take on recent contributions to the textual and editorial scholarship of Yeats, Shakespeare, and Dickinson, among others. W. Speed Hill is Professor of English, Lehman College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Edward M. Burns is Professor of English, William Patterson College. Peter Shillingsburg is Associate Director of Graduate Studies and Research, Lamar University. TEXT 12 brings a substantial focus on international perspectives on textual theory and practice, with essays including Pierre-Marc De Biasi's examination of the questions surrounding manuscript editions, "Editing Manuscripts: Toward a Typology of Recent French Genetic Editions, 1980-1995" and Alberto Varvaro's "The 'New Philology' from the Italian Perspective" as well as Bodo Plachta's discussion of questions in German scholarly editing. Other highlights include Kathryn Sutherland's investigation of the importance of punctuation to meaning, using Jane Austen's Mansfield Park as a case study and Andrew Durking's exploration "The Self-Playing Piano as a Site for Textual Criticism." Review essays and book reviews in this volume take on recent contributions to the textual and editorial scholarship of Yeats, Shakespeare, and Dickinson, among others. W. Speed Hill is Professor of English, Lehman College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Edward M. Burns is Professor of English, William Patterson College. Peter Shillingsburg is Associate Director of Graduate Studies and Research, Lamar University.

Loaded Words

Author: Marjorie Garber

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 240

One of our most important cultural critics, at the top of her form, comments on a wide range of topics in both general and academic culture. In Loaded Words the inimitable literary and cultural critic Marjorie Garber invites readers to join her in a rigorous and exuberant exploration of language. What links the pieces included in this vibrant new collection is the author's contention that all words are inescapably loaded-that is, highly charged, explosive, substantial, intoxicating, fruitful, and overbrimming-and that such loading is what makes language matter. Garber casts her keen eye on terms from knowledge, belief, madness, interruption, genius, and celebrity to humanities, general education, and academia. Included here are an array of stirring essays, from the title piece, with its demonstration of the importance of language to our thinking about the world; to the superb "Mad Lib," on the concept of madness from Mad magazine to debates between Foucault and Derrida; to pieces on Shakespeare, "the most culturally loaded name of our time," and the Renaissance. With its wide range of cultural references and engaging style coupled with fresh intellectual inquiry, Loaded Words will draw in and enchant scholars, students, and general readers alike.

Albee: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Author: Stephen J. Bottoms

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 204

View: 465

A full study of this major contemporary play, including an interview with Edward Albee.

Body Parts

Essays on Life-Writing

Author: Hermione Lee

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 319

As readers, we seem to be increasingly fascinated by studies of individual lives. In this timely, unusual and exhilarating collection Hermione Lee is concerned in different ways with approaches to 'life-writing': the relation of biography to fiction and history; the exploration of writers' lives in connection with their works; the new and changing ways in which biographies, memoirs, diaries and autobiographies can be discussed. As the title suggests, she also unravels the complex links between physical, sensual details and the 'body' of a work. 'Shelley's Heart and Pepys' Lobsters', for example, deals with myths, contested objects and things that go missing, while 'Jane Austen Faints' takes five varied accounts of the same dramatic moment to ask how biography deals with the private lives of famous women, a theme taken up in 'Virginia Woolf's Nose', on the way that the author's life-stories have been transformed into fiction and film. Rich, diverting and entertaining, these brilliant studies by a leading critic and internationally acclaimed biographer raise profound and intriguing issues about every aspect of writing, and reading, a life.

Electrified Voices

Medial, Socio-Historical and Cultural Aspects of Voice Transfer

Author: Dmitri Zakharine

Publisher: V&R unipress GmbH

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 645

The aim of this book is to explore the phenomenon of the electrified voice through interdisciplinary approaches such as media and technology studies, social history, and comparative cultural studies. The book focuses on three problem clusters: reflections on the societal level about the task of electronic voice transmission; the mediation of gender- and occupation-specific vocal stereotypes in audio and audio-visual formats; and the genesis of such vocal stereotypes in national radio and film cultures. Such a historicizing approach to societal experience in the field of voice mediation, including the use and interpretation of voice media, is today of great relevance in light of the collective learning processes currently triggered by rapid advances in technology.

Stewart Parker

A Life

Author: Marilynn Richtarik

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 493

Born in Belfast during World War II, raised in a working-class Protestant family, and educated on scholarship at Queen's University, writer Stewart Parker's story is in many ways the story of his generation. Other aspects of his personal history, though, such as the amputation of his left leg at age 19, helped to create an extraordinarily perceptive observer and commentator. Steeped in American popular culture as a child and young adult, he spent five years teaching in the United States before returning to Belfast in August 1969, the same week British troops responded to sectarian disturbances there. Parker had developed a sense of writing as a form of political action in the highly charged atmosphere of the US in the late 1960s, which he applied in many and varied capacities throughout the worst years of the Troubles to express his own socialist and secular vision of Northern Irish potential. As a young aspiring poet and novelist, he supported himself with free-lance work that brought him into contact with institutions ranging from BBC Northern Ireland to the Irish Times (for which he wrote personal columns and the music review feature High Pop) and from the Queen's University Extramural Department to Long Kesh internment camp (where his creative writing students included Gerry Adams). It is as a playwright, however, that Parker earned a permanent spot in the literary canon with drama that encapsulates his experience of Northern Ireland in the 1970s. Marilynn Richtarik's Stewart Parker: A Life illuminates the genesis, development, and meaning of such classic plays as Spokesong, Northern Star, and Pentecost - works that continue to shed light on the North's past, present, and future - in the context of Parker's life and times. Meticulously researched and engagingly written, this critical biography rewards general readers and specialists alike.