Weekends at Bellevue

Nine Years on the Night Shift at the Psych ER

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 350

“A gem of a memoir . . . Holland takes us for a ride through the psych ER that is at once wild and poignant, a ride that leaves deep tracks in even the healthiest of minds.”—Katrina Firlik, M.D., author of Another Day in the Frontal Lobe Julie Holland thought she knew what crazy was. Then she came to Bellevue. For nine eventful years, Dr. Holland was the weekend physician in charge of the psychiatric emergency room at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital. In this absorbing memoir, Holland recounts stories from her vast case files that are alternately terrifying, tragically comic, and profoundly moving: the serial killer, the naked man barking like a dog in Times Square, the schizophrenic begging for an injection of club soda to quiet the voices in his head, the subway conductor who helplessly watched a young woman pushed into the path of his train. Writing with uncommon candor, Holland supplies not only a page-turner with all the fast-paced immediacy of a TV medical drama but also a fascinating glimpse into the inner lives of doctors who struggle to maintain perspective in a world where sanity is in the eye of the beholder. Praise for Weekends at Bellevue “An extraordinary insider’s look at the typical days and nights of that most extraordinary place, written with a rare combination of toughness, tenderness, and outrageous humor.”—Andrew Weil, M.D. “Unforgettable . . . tells a mean story.”—New York Daily News “The tension between [Holland’s] macho swagger and her shame at the harsh way she occasionally treats patients gives this memoir extra intrigue.”—Psychology Today “A fascinating portrait . . . Holland is a good storyteller with a dark wit.” —New York Post “Equal parts affecting, jaw-dropping, and engrossing.”—Booklist

Weekends at Bellevue

Author: Hamzer akyuz

Publisher: dasddda

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 596

NATIONAL BESTSELLER Julie Holland thought she knew what crazy was. Then she came to Bellevue. For nine eventful years, Dr. Holland was the weekend physician in charge of the psychiatric emergency room at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital. In this absorbing memoir, Holland recounts stories from her vast case files that are alternately terrifying, tragically comic, and profoundly moving: the serial killer, the naked man barking like a dog in Times Square, the schizophrenic begging for an injection of club soda to quiet the voices in his head, the subway conductor who watched a young woman pushed into the path of his train. Writing with uncommon candor, Holland supplies not only a page-turner with all the fast-paced immediacy of a TV medical drama but also a fascinating glimpse into the inner lives of doctors who struggle to maintain perspective in a world where sanity is in the eye of the beholder. Amazon.com Review Amazon Exclusive: Julie Holland on Weekends at Bellevue No one is immune from mental illness. After working at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital for nine years, as the psychiatrist in charge of admissions at the psych E.R. on Saturday and Sunday nights, I came away knowing this for sure. Over the years, I admitted heiresses and art dealers, altar boys and college students, homecoming queens, studio executives, bankers, lawyers, correction officers, and the list goes on. No matter who you are, what you do for a living, how much money you have in the bank, or how often you go to church, circumstances can transpire that will bring you to Bellevue. This is one of the hardest lessons for our patients to learn. My years at Bellevue taught me many things, life lessons I could never have hoped to receive elsewhere, but the main take-home message was this: cherish your sanity, for it can be lost in the blink of an eye. Sometimes I saw the same patients repeatedly, alcoholics and addicts who were hitting bottom in regular cycles, showing up when their funds ran out. Other times, however, I met patients with no psychiatric history, who ended up at Bellevue when a bad break-up led to a suicide attempt, or a shared cigarette at a bar led to a PCP-induced psychosis. There are so many ways in which a life can suddenly unravel, and many of my patients could specify just when that started to happen for them--whether it was joining the army, leaving home for college, or living through the death of their child. Many of the people I encountered at Bellevue tried strenuously to convince me that they did not belong there. Or vice versa. A big part of my job was learning how to separate the genuinely disturbed from the fakers (some people actually wanted to be admitted to Bellevue, if only for the promise of a clean bed and three meals a day), and to identify the people who had been misunderstood, misdiagnosed, who weren’t mentally ill at all. After a few years of Bellevue experiences under my belt, I developed a sixth sense for what real crazy looked like, sounded like, and yes, smelled like. One night a young man was brought in to the E.R. because he was found on a street corner preaching to passersby to give up their worldly possessions. I knew enough to listen and wait, and not rush to judgment, even though it might have seemed a no-brainer to admit him. Once I was able to draw him out, I learned that he had taken psychedelic mushrooms and then spent time in a Chelsea art gallery known as COSM, which I myself had been to and knew to be an intense, inspirational and potentially overwhelming experience, something that might well unhinge a person on mind-altering drugs. I spoke with him gently as his trip slowly ebbed, helping him to navigate his re-entry in the city hospital where he had landed with no money or identification. He stayed in touch with me for months afterwards, grateful that I was there to protect him when he soared--however briefly--beyond the boundaries of normal behavior. There is a diaphanous membrane between sane and insane. It is the flimsiest of barriers, and because any one of us can break through at any time, it terrifies us, causing us to turn our backs on those who remind us of this painful reality. But spending so much time with people who marched out of the lockstep of sanity has made me less forgiving of the way the mentally ill are ostracized and shunned. We owe them something better. And we should remember that the barrier separating "them" from "us" is not nearly as secure as we might think.--Julie Holland From Publishers Weekly In this disjointed memoir, Holland describes her nine-year odyssey as a doctor on the night shift at New York City's Bellevue hospital, a name that has become synonymous with insanity. Holland met a bewildering assortment of drunks, sociopaths, schizophrenics and homeless people malingering in hope of a warm place to crash. As the physician in charge of the psychiatric emergency room, the hard-boiled Holland acted as gatekeeper, deciding who would be sent upstairs to the psych ward, to Central Booking or back to the streets. The book also covers Holland's personal life from her student days as a wannabe rock star to her psychotherapy sessions, her sexual escapades and her marriage and birth of her children. Holland captures the rhythms and routines of the E.R. with its unbearable suffering, petty jealousies and gallows humor. She is less successful at maintaining any kind of narrative continuity. Chapters generally run only a couple of pages and often depict random anecdotes that most likely sound better than they read. *(Oct.) * Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Summary and Analysis of Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital

Based on the Book by David Oshinsky

Author: Worth Books

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Study Aids

Page: 30

View: 439

So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of Bellevue tells you what you need to know—before or after you read David Oshinsky’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of Bellevue includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Character profiles Detailed timeline of key events Important quotes and analysis Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital by David Oshinsky: Pulitzer Prize–winning historian David Oshinsky provides a comprehensive account of New York City’s famous Bellevue Hospital, from its early inception as a poorhouse infirmary to its most recent struggles and triumphs, including a dramatic evacuation during Hurricane Sandy and the successful treatment of an Ebola patient. In the centuries between, the hospital contends with epidemics ranging from yellow fever to AIDS, a meddling journalist named Nellie Bly, and the tragic murder of a doctor on hospital grounds by a mental patient. Some of Bellevue’s finest staff are highlighted, including two doctors who operated on American presidents and two others who virtually invented forensic science. The history of Bellevue is the history of New York City, in all of its complicated and controversial glory, and its mission to serve the underprivileged is a fulfillment of the duty inscribed on the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses.” The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

Bellevue

Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital

Author: David Oshinsky

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 657

From a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian comes a riveting history of New York's iconic public hospital that charts the turbulent rise of American medicine. Bellevue Hospital, on New York City's East Side, occupies a colorful and horrifying place in the public imagination: a den of mangled crime victims, vicious psychopaths, assorted derelicts, lunatics, and exotic-disease sufferers. In its two and a half centuries of service, there was hardly an epidemic or social catastrophe—or groundbreaking scientific advance—that did not touch Bellevue. David Oshinsky, whose last book, Polio: An American Story, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize, chronicles the history of America's oldest hospital and in so doing also charts the rise of New York to the nation's preeminent city, the path of American medicine from butchery and quackery to a professional and scientific endeavor, and the growth of a civic institution. From its origins in 1738 as an almshouse and pesthouse, Bellevue today is a revered public hospital bringing first-class care to anyone in need. With its diverse, ailing, and unprotesting patient population, the hospital was a natural laboratory for the nation's first clinical research. It treated tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers, launched the first civilian ambulance corps and the first nursing school for women, pioneered medical photography and psychiatric treatment, and spurred New York City to establish the country's first official Board of Health. As medical technology advanced, "voluntary" hospitals began to seek out patients willing to pay for their care. For charity cases, it was left to Bellevue to fill the void. The latter decades of the twentieth century brought rampant crime, drug addiction, and homelessness to the nation's struggling cities—problems that called a public hospital's very survival into question. It took the AIDS crisis to cement Bellevue's enduring place as New York's ultimate safety net, the iconic hospital of last resort. Lively, page-turning, fascinating, Bellevue is essential American history.

The Little Engine

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fire engines

Page: 24

View: 258

Big Green Caterpillar

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 16

View: 633

A small boy keeps a green caterpillar, even though his parents and school friends don't understand why. The story is a vehicle for describing the life cycle of a moth. One of eight small books in Literacy Links Satellites Stage 4 Set A.

Tall Tales

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Children's stories, New Zealand

Page: 16

View: 937

Grandpa is always telling tall tales, like the moon is made of cheese. Suggested level: junior.

Welcome Down Under

Nina's Australian Adventures

Author: Laurence Aubineau

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Adventure stories

Page: 104

View: 107

Frieda's Journey

Author: Frieda Lefeber

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 319

View: 785

Not long after graduating from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts at the age of 83, Frieda Lefeber decided to embark on yet another creative adventure, writing her first book. In Frieda's Journey, she tells her story, from her birth in Germany in 1915 right up to the present day. Frieda shares with readers her vivid memories of the horrors of World War I, post-war Germany, the depression, life under the Hitler regime, and the pre-World War II persecution of the Jews that culminated in Kristallnacht. In opposition to the serious and gruesome details of her fear of and eventual escape from life in Germany, she shares humorous anecdotes from her childhood and her experiences as a foreigner struggling with a new language, as well as memories of her many successes and lucky breaks. She also discusses the many issues facing America's immigrant population in the latter half of the Twentieth Century, as well as the joys and talents that can be found unexpectedly even late in life. Frieda's Journey is an inspiration, and will remind the young and old alike how to live passionately and with wisdom, and to overcome hardships and come out all the better for it.

My Schizophrenic Life

The Road to Recovery from Mental Illness

Author: Sandra Yuen MacKay

Publisher: Bridgeross Communications

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 210

View: 157

Vancouver artist Sandra Yuen MacKay has an abnormality of the brain - a disease called schizophrenia. As she says, "my life is schizophrenic because I have schizophrenia. It will always be there." Much of her life has been a struggle to cope with the symptoms of her disease and the side effects of the medications required to keep those symptoms in check. Early in her life, Sandra started to exhibit the typical symptoms of this disease which came as a surprise to her unsuspecting family. Her book chronicles her struggles, hospitalizations, encounters with professionals, return to school, eventual marriage, and success as an artist, writer and advocate. "Remarkably compelling...the book takes on a life if its own...a gripping narrative" Library Journal "There are precious few people who have experienced psychosis and can convey it accurately, clearly, and concisely. Sandra MacKay's story is an important one for all of us in the mental health field --doctors, patients, and their families. It is imperative that we take in the lessons she is imparting to us all, on how to manage, and in many ways, triumph, over chronic mental illness." Julie Holland, MD author, Weekends at Bellevue: Nine Years on the Night Shift at the Psych ER., New York city

Singular Intimacies

Becoming a Doctor at Bellevue

Author: Danielle Ofri, MD

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 172

Singular Intimacies is the story of becoming a doctor by immersion at New York's Bellevue Hospital, the oldest public hospital in the country. When Danielle Ofri first enters the doors as a medical student, she is immediately plunged into the teeming world of urban medicine. It is here that Dr. Ofri develops a profound instinct for healing and, above all, learns to navigate the tangled vulnerabilities of doctor and patient.

Good Chemistry

The Science of Connection, from Soul to Psychedelics

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 501

A psychiatrist and psychedelic researcher explores the science of connection—why we need it, how we’ve lost it, and how we might find it again. We are suffering from an epidemic of disconnection that antidepressants and social media can’t fix. This state of isolation puts us in “fight or flight mode,” deranging sleep, metabolism and libido. What’s worse, we’re paranoid of others. This kill-or-be-killed framework is not a way to live. But, when we feel safe and loved, we can rest, digest, and repair. We can heal. And it is only in this state of belonging that we can open up to connection with others. In this powerful book, Holland helps us to understand the science of connection as revealed in human experiences from the spiritual to the psychedelic. The key is oxytocin—a neurotransmitter and hormone produced in our bodies that allows us to trust and bond. It fosters attachment between mothers and infants, romantic partners, friends, and even with our pets. There are many ways to reach this state of mental and physical wellbeing that modern medicine has overlooked. The implications for our happiness and health are profound. We can find oneness in meditation, in community, or in awe at the beauty around us. Another option: psychedelic medicines that can catalyze a connection with the self, with nature, or the cosmos. Good Chemistry points us on the right path to forging true and deeper attachments with our own souls, to one another, and even to our planet, helping us heal ourselves and our world.

Snip

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 220

View: 251

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A Nest Twice Built

A Little Book of Reflection, Inspiration and Humour

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher: Hearts and Minds Art

ISBN:

Category: Humorous poetry

Page: 94

View: 992

A NEST TWICE BUILT is a little book of inspiration, reflection and humour. Julie Holland is a published writer but this is the first collection of her prose. Drawn from her own thoughts, and from conversations shared by strangers, Julie's words aim to inspire and encourage. A lovely book to have bedside, to dip into and to revisit time and again.

Moody Bitches

The Truth About the Drugs You're Taking, The Sleep You're Missing, The Sex You're Not Having, and What's Really Making You Crazy

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 432

View: 121

A groundbreaking guide for women of all ages that shows women’s inherent moodiness is a strength, not a weakness As women, we learn from an early age that our moods are a problem. Bitches are moody. To succeed in life, we are told, we must have it all under control. We have to tamp down our inherent shifts in favor of a more static way of being. But our bodies are wiser than we imagine. Moods are not an annoyance to be stuffed away. They are a finely-tuned feedback system that, if heeded, can tell us how best to manage our lives. Our changing moods let us know when our bodies are primed to tackle different challenges and when we should be alert to developing problems. They help us select the right tool for each of our many jobs. If we deny our emotionality, we deny the breadth of our talents. With the right care of our inherently dynamic bodies, we can master our moods to avail ourselves of this great natural strength. Yet millions of American women are medicating away their emotions because our culture says that moodiness is a problem to be fixed. One in four of us takes a psychiatric drug. If you add sleeping pills to the mix, the statistics become considerably higher. Over-prescribed medications can have devastating consequences for women in many areas of our lives: sex, relationships, sleep, eating, focus, balance, and aging. And even if we don’t pop a pill, women everywhere are numbing their emotions with food, alcohol, and a host of addictive behaviors that deny the wisdom of our bodies and keep us from addressing the real issues that we face. Dr. Julie Holland knows there is a better way. She’s been sharing her frank and funny wisdom with her patients for years, and in Moody Bitches Dr. Holland offers readers a guide to our bodies and our moodiness that includes insider information about the pros and cons of the drugs we’re being offered, the direct link between food and mood, an honest discussion about sex, practical exercise and sleep strategies, as well as some surprising and highly effective natural therapies that can help us press the reset button on our own bodies and minds. In the tradition of Our Bodies, Our Selves, this groundbreaking guide for women of all ages will forge a much needed new path in women’s health—and offer women invaluable information on how to live better, and be more balanced, at every stage of life.

ShadowTan

The Hunt: Book Two: The Hunt

Author: Julie Holland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 204

View: 227

Elarune escaped EndWar Australia with her uncle Bruno, her brother Olias (born with one arm), and the orphaned Randling who they pick up along the way. A deadly toxin has been released into the water supply and few have survived. The planet has been divided into two, the United States of the Northern Hemisphere above the equator, and the Southern Empire below. Oil is transported from the north and traded for the only uncontaminated whitewater, drilled out of the Antarctic. Trades are made in the RedZone, the equator. Elarune and her brother are ShadowTan, a rare genetic mutation able to survive the toxin and their lives are constantly at risk from OpusRex attack. In ShadowTan : The Hunt, the countdown is on to locate two more ShadowTan living in the dangerous NorthSector3. Time is running out.

Mummy Dearest

How Two Guys in a Potato Chip Truck Changed the Way the Living See the Dead

Author: Ron Becket

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 436

"The unlikely hosts of the National Geographic Channel's popular 'Mummy road show' recount their adventures both in front of the camera and behind the scenes as they travel the world in a converted Charles Chips delivery van"--P. [4] of cover.

Brooklyn Zoo

The Education of a Psychotherapist

Author: Darcy Lockman

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 567

A compelling memoir of a psychotherapist’s clinical and personal education amid chaos and dysfunction that delivers an emotional impact to rival Susan Sheehan’s classic Is There No Place on Earth for Me? Seven years after her college graduation, Darcy Lockman abandoned a career in magazine journalism to become a psychologist. After four years in classrooms, she spent her final training year at the Kings County Hospital, an aging public institution on the outskirts of Brooklyn. When she started, little did she know that the hospital’s behavioral health department—the infamous G Building, where the Son of Sam serial killer David Berkowitz and the rapper Ol’ Dirty Bastard once resided—was on the cusp of its darkest era yet, one that culminated in the death of a patient in a psychiatric emergency room described by the New York Post as a “Dickensian nightmare.” Brooklyn Zoo unfolds amid the constant drama and disorder of the G Building. Lockman rotates through four departments, each of which presents new challenges and haunting cases. She works with forensic psychologists to evaluate offenders for fitness to stand trial—almost all of them with pathos-filled histories and little hope of rehabilitation. The thorny politics of the psych ER compound her anxiety about working with its volatile patients, but under the wing of a charismatic if brusque mentor she gains a deeper insight into her new profession as well as into her own strengths and limitations. As she moves to the inpatient ward and then psychiatric consultation liaison, Lockman’s overstretched supervisors and the institutional preference for pills over therapy are persistent obstacles. But they eventually present a young clinician with the opportunity to reexamine everything she believes and to come out stronger on the other side. Lockman’s frank portrayal of her fledgling role in a warped system is a professional coming-of-age story that will resonate with anyone who has fought to develop career mastery in a demanding environment. A stark portrait of the struggling public mental-health-care system, Brooklyn Zoo is also an homage to the doctors who remain committed to their patients in spite of institutional failures and to the patients who strive to get better with their help. And it is an inspiring first-hand account by a narrator who triumphs over self-doubt to believe in the rightness and efficacy of her chosen profession.

Away for the Weekend, New England

52 Great Getaways in the Six New England States for Every Season of the Year

Author: Eleanor Berman

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN:

Category: New England

Page: 273

View: 519

For a memorable weekend getaway any time of the year in Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, did you know you can -- Sign on for a cruise departing from the "Whale Watching Capital of the World"? -- Watch the Highland games at a Fourth of July Scottish festival? -- Celebrate autumn at the biggest fair in Maine? -- Relive old-fashioned holiday traditions in a colonial town? Or you can canoe down lazy rivers, go gallery-hopping in quaint college towns, or feast on succulent Shaker fare made from authentic recipes. In this revised and updated edition, Eleanor Berman offers fifty-two itineraries for year-round "mini-vacations" that open up a world of dunes and marsh-side blueberry patches, of covered bridges, and of tiny towns all but untouched by time. Each itinerary includes detailed travel directions and a directory listing accommodations and restaurants in every price range. There are also four easy-to-follow maps, and activities especially appealing to children are noted.