Vital Breath of the Dao

Chinese Shamanic Tiger Qigong - Laohu Gong

Author: Zhongxian Wu

Publisher: Singing Dragon

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 134

Vital Breath of the Dao is a fully illustrated guide to the historical background, practical application, underlying principles and techniques of Qigong, a way of physical and spiritual cultivation, and a way of life. Chinese Shamanic Tiger Qigong is a uniquely potent practice designed to bolster health and deepen spiritual connection to universal energy. Lineage holder Master Zhongxian Wu uses story-telling and a wealth of practical examples to introduce this powerful 24-movement Qigong form, which combines the traditions of ancient shamanism, Confucianism, Daoism, classical Chinese medicine, and the martial arts. An excellent introduction for Qigong beginners, the book will also be of interest to experienced practitioners, students of classical Chinese Medicine and anyone interested in Classical Chinese culture and anthropology.

The 12 Chinese Animals

Create Harmony in your Daily Life through Ancient Chinese Wisdom

Author: Zhongxian Wu

Publisher: Singing Dragon

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 266

* Silver Medal Winner in the 2010 BOTYA Awards Body, Mind and Spirit Category * The Chinese horoscope holds the key to a better understanding of self and others, and to living a life of harmony. Not just the year of birth, but also the month, day and hour have significance in true Chinese astrology. Master Zhongxian Wu explains how to find your power animal symbols, and how to learn from their wisdom. By fully understanding what each animal signifies, and how they relate to the major hexagrams of the Yijing, he shows that they can help you to find inner peace and live in harmony with family, friends, the wider community, and with nature. Using the wisdom of the twelve animal symbols as a guide, you will learn how to better understand your personality, and make choices that profoundly influence your health, relationships, career, and finances, allowing you to live up to your greatest potential. Making the wisdom of the twelve Chinese animals accessible to the Western reader for the first time in its relationship with the Yijing, this book will be an illuminating read for anyone interested in understanding themselves and their life patterns better, Chinese astrology, and the Yijing.

Dao Companion to ZHU Xi’s Philosophy

Author: Kai-chiu Ng

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1005

View: 274

Zhu Xi (1130-1200) has been commonly and justifiably recognized as the most influential philosopher of Neo-Confucianism, a revival of classical Confucianism in face of the challenges coming from Daoism and, more importantly, Buddhism. His place in the Confucian tradition is often and also very plausibly compared to that of Thomas Aquinas, slightly later, in the Christian tradition. This book presents the most comprehensive and updated study of this great philosopher. It situates Zhu Xi’s philosophy in the historical context of not only Confucian philosophy but also Chinese philosophy as a whole. Topics covered within Zhu Xi’s thought are metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, hermeneutics, philosophy of religion, moral psychology, and moral education. This text shows both how Zhu Xi responded to earlier thinkers and how his thoughts resonate in contemporary philosophy, particularly in the analytic tradition. This companion will appeal to students, researchers and educators in the field.

Cha Dao

The Way of Tea, Tea as a Way of Life

Author: Solala Towler

Publisher: Singing Dragon

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 172

View: 825

In China, the practice of drinking tea is about much more than soaking leaves in a cup of hot water. Cha Dao takes us on a fascinating journey through the Way of Tea, from its origins in the sacred temples of ancient China, through its links to Daoist concepts such as or non-striving, to the affinity between Tea Mind and the Japanese spirit of Zen.

Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy

Author: Xiaogan Liu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 569

View: 616

This is the first comprehensive companion to the study of Daoism as a philosophical tradition. It provides a general overview of Daoist philosophy in various thinkers and texts from 6th century BCE to 5th century CE and reflects the latest academic developments in the field. It discusses theoretical and philosophical issues based on rigorous textual and historical investigations and examinations, reflecting both the ancient scholarship and modern approaches and methodologies. The themes include debates on the origin of the Daoism, the authorship and dating of the Laozi, the authorship and classification of chapters in the Zhuangzi, the themes and philosophical arguments in the Laozi and Zhuangzi, their transformations and developments in Pre-Qin, Han, and Wei-Jin periods, by Huang-Lao school, Heguanzi, Wenzi, Huainanzi, Wang Bi, Guo Xiang, and Worthies in bamboo grove, among others. Each chapter is written by expert(s) and specialist(s) on the topic discussed.

From Destiny to Dao: A Survey of Pre-Qin Philosophy in China

Author: Huang Kejian

Publisher: Enrich Professional Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 203

From Destiny to Dao: A Survey of Pre-Qin Philosophy in China surveys the prominent schools of thought in Pre-Qin China — Daoism, Confucianism, Mohism, the School of Names, Legalism, and the School of Yin-Yang. Author Huang Kejian explores the development of thought from the mystical concept of destiny to the philosophical “Dao” and offers a discussion of the major philosophical themes in each school of thought with a unique collection of insights from commentators. This book offers readers a holistic understanding of their philosophies through their historical place, existential concerns, and impact on future philosophers.

Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei

Author: Paul Goldin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 290

View: 450

Han Fei, who died in 233 BC, was one of the primary philosophers of China’s classical era, a reputation still intact despite recent neglect. This edited volume on the thinker, his views on politics and philosophy, and the tensions of his relations with Confucianism (which he derided) is the first of its kind in English. Featuring contributions from specialists in various disciplines including religious studies and literature, this new addition to the Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy series includes the latest research. It breaks new ground with studies of Han Fei’s intellectual antecedents, and his relationship as a historical figure with Han Feizi, the text attributed to him, as well as surveying the full panoply of his thought. It also includes a chapter length survey of relevant scholarship, both in Chinese and Japanese.

Pristine Dao, The

Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse

Author: Thomas Michael

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 182

View: 113

A new reading of Daoism, arguing that it originated in a particular textual tradition distinct from Confucianism and other philosophical traditions of early China.

Seeking the Spirit of The Book of Change

8 Days to Mastering a Shamanic Yijing (I Ching) Prediction System

Author: Zhongxian Wu

Publisher: Singing Dragon

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 240

View: 162

The Yijing (I Ching) or "Book of Change" is one of the oldest of the Chinese classic texts and has held a key place in the Daoist tradition for thousands of years. Explaining the ancient Yijing system of prediction based on the Xiang (symbolism) and Shu (numerology) knowledge of Bagua (the eight basic trigrams), which have not previously been written about outside China, this book makes the Yijing accessible to the Western world in a new and fuller way. In the space of just eight days, Master Zhongxian Wu leads the reader towards a deep understanding of the Eight Trigrams of the Yijing and how to apply this knowledge in practical ways in daily life. Master Wu explores the numerology and symbolism of Yijing and clearly explains how the reader can use the Yijing divination system for themselves. This remarkable book provides a user-friendly eight day program that will be a fascinating read for anyone with an interest in learning more about the Yijing or Chinese philosophy and culture as a whole, as well as those who wish to learn how to use the Yijing for practical purposes.

Chinese Shamanic Cosmic Orbit Qigong

Esoteric Talismans, Mantras, and Mudras in Healing and Inner Cultivation

Author: Zhongxian Wu

Publisher: Singing Dragon

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 110

View: 897

Never before written about in the West, this advanced form of Qigong from one of China's esoteric traditions offers great cumulative benefits from regular daily practice. Master Wu describes the practice in detail, provides the mantra, visualization, and mudra for each movement as well as explaining the therapeutic benefits of the practice.

Dao Yin

Author:

Publisher: East - West Publications

ISBN:

Category: Dao yin

Page: 76

View: 889

Dao

A Journal of Comparative Philosophy

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy, Comparative

Page:

View: 868

Dao of Chinese Medicine

Understanding an Ancient Healing Art

Author: Donald E. Kendall

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 356

View: 612

Explores the ancient system of physiological medicine in China, and the system's applications in the field of modern medicine.

The Sacred Paths

Understanding the Religions of the World

Author: Theodore M. Ludwig

Publisher: Macmillan College

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 574

View: 926

This book combines study of the dynamic historical development of each religious tradition with a comparative thematic structure. In this way, the book helps readers to explore each of the major religions as a unique and integral system of meaning and life. At the same time, readers are encouraged to discover and explore the nature of religious experience by comparing basic themes and issues common to all religions. Covering the religions arising from India, China, Japan, and the Mediterranean world, this book introduces the key dimensions of religious experience, outlining the basic human concerns that give rise to religious experience, such as origin and identity, ultimate reality, human nature, and the good life. For anyone interested in exploring the origins and development of the diverse religions of the world.

Daoism in the Twentieth Century

Between Eternity and Modernity

Author: David A. Palmer

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 387

View: 513

In this volume an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the social history and anthropology of Daoism from the late nineteenth century to the present, focusing on the evolution of traditional forms of practice and community, as well as modern reforms and reinventions both within China and on the global stage. Essays investigate ritual specialists, body cultivation and meditation traditions, monasticism, new religious movements, state-sponsored institutionalization, and transnational networks.

Tao Te Ching: a guide to the interpretation of the foundational book of Taoism

Author: Shantena Augusto Sabbadini

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 636

View: 732

The Tao Te Ching is the foundational text of Taoism. Traditionally considered the work of the 'Old Master', Lao Tzu, a senior contemporary of Confucius, this 2500 years old text is a poetic and supremely concise formulation of some of humanity's highest wisdom. Revered as a basic book of spiritual guidance throughout Chinese history, it has become a beloved inspirational work in the West. The present work is meant to help the Western reader to penetrate the depth and subtlety of Lao Tzu's wisdom without requiring a knowledge of the Chinese language. Readers are offered a choice between various interpretations and are guided in non-technical terms to explore how they originate. More importantly, they are also offered the possibility to hold all the various resonances of the text simultaneously, just as a Chinese reader would, and thus access the original wealth of meaning in a way no ordinary translation could convey.