Vanity Fair

Author: William Makepeace Thackeray

Publisher: Courier Dover Publications

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Category: Fiction

Page: 801

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The story of English society in the early nineteenth century.

At Vanity Fair

From Bunyan to Thackeray

Author: Kirsty Milne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Category: History

Page: 237

View: 379

Explores how Vanity Fair transformed from its Puritan origins as an emblem of sin into a modern celebration of hedonism.

Vanity Fair

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Category: American periodicals

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Vanity Fair

A Novel Without a Hero

Author: William Makepeace Thackeray

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Page: 885

View: 259

Vanity Fair

Author: Thackeray W.

Publisher: Рипол Классик

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Category: Fiction

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View: 844

“Ярмарка тщеславия” не только изобилует неожиданными сюжетными поворотами, но и блестяще отражает дух времени. Ироничное, порой саркастичное произведение, изобличающее сборище подлых самовлюблённых людей, остаётся интересным и актуальным и по сей день. Неудивительно, что именно эта история поисков счастья двух подруг считается вершиной творчества знаменитого английского классика! Читайте зарубежную литературу в оригинале!

Vanity Fair

A Novel Without a Hero

Author: Thackeray

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Page: 368

View: 330

Vanity Fair, etc

Author: William Makepeace Thackeray

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Page: 584

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Vanity Fair's Women on Women

Author: Radhika Jones

Publisher: Penguin

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Category: Literary Collections

Page: 448

View: 212

Looking back at the last thirty-five years of Vanity Fair stories on women, by women, with an introduction by the magazine’s editor in chief, Radhika Jones Gail Sheehy on Hillary Clinton. Ingrid Sischy on Nicole Kidman. Jacqueline Woodson on Lena Waithe. Leslie Bennetts on Michelle Obama. And two Maureens (Orth and Dowd) on two Tinas (Turner and Fey). Vanity Fair’s Women on Women features a selection of the best profiles, essays, and columns on female subjects written by female contributors to the magazine over the past thirty-five years. From the viewpoint of the female gaze come penetrating profiles on everyone from Gloria Steinem to Princess Diana to Whoopi Goldberg to essays on workplace sexual harassment (by Bethany McLean) to a post–#MeToo reassessment of the Clinton scandal (by Monica Lewinsky). Many of these pieces constitute the first draft of a larger cultural narrative. They tell a singular story about female icons and identity over the last four decades—and about the magazine as it has evolved under the editorial direction of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, and now Radhika Jones, who has written a compelling introduction. When Vanity Fair’s inaugural editor, Frank Crowninshield, took the helm of the magazine in 1914, his mission statement declared, “We hereby announce ourselves as determined and bigoted feminists.” Under Jones’s leadership, Vanity Fair continues the publication’s proud tradition of highlighting women’s voices—and all the many ways they define our culture.

Adam Smith’s Moral Sentiments in Vanity Fair

Lessons in Business Ethics from Becky Sharp

Author: Rosa Slegers

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 187

View: 103

According to Adam Smith, vanity is a vice that contains a promise: a vain person is much more likely than a person with low self-esteem to accomplish great things. Problematic as it may be from a moral perspective, vanity makes a person more likely to succeed in business, politics and other public pursuits. “The great secret of education,” Smith writes, “is to direct vanity to proper objects:” this peculiar vice can serve as a stepping-stone to virtue. How can this transformation be accomplished and what might go wrong along the way? What exactly is vanity and how does it factor into our personal and professional lives, for better and for worse? This book brings Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments into conversation with William Makepeace Thackeray’s Vanity Fair to offer an analysis of vanity and the objects (proper and otherwise) to which it may be directed. Leading the way through the literary case study presented here is Becky Sharp, the ambitious and cunning protagonist of Thackeray’s novel. Becky is joined by a number of other 19th Century literary heroines – drawn from the novels of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot – whose feminine (and feminist) perspectives complement Smith’s astute observations and complicate his account of vanity. The fictional characters featured in this volume enrich and deepen our understanding of Smith’s work and disclose parts of our own experience in a fresh way, revealing the dark and at times ridiculous aspects of life in Vanity Fair, today as in the past.