U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Author: Oscar Jáquez Martínez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 774

"Excellent collection of scholarly essays and primary documents. Covers 1830s-1990s, with the emphasis on the post-1910 era. Work is divided into seven sections, each covering a key issue in borderlands history. Good introduction to each entry"--Handbookof Latin American Studies, v. 58.

U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Author: Oscar J. Martinez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 593

The U.S.-Mexican borderlands form the region where the United States and Latin America have interacted with the greatest intensity. In U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, Oscar Martinez has brought together both scholarly essays and primary documents that address the protracted conflict rooted in the vast difference in power between Mexico and its northern neighbor. Each of the seven parts of this new reader explores a key issue in borderlands studies and contains several essays followed by documents such as treaties, government reports, newspaper articles, and interviews.

Redeeming La Raza

Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights

Author: Gabriela González

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 624

The economic modernization of the American Southwest and Mexico transformed the lives of ethnic Mexicans, subjecting them to economic exploitation and racism. Redeeming La Raza analyzes how political activists, using multiple strategies, challenged white supremacy, seeking to instill in ethnic Mexicans a sense of ethnic pride and unity.

Latin America During World War II

Author: George M. Lauderbaugh

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 969

The first full-length study of World War II from the Latin American perspective, this unique volume offers an in-depth analysis of the region during wartime. Each country responded to World War II according to its own national interests, which often conflicted with those of the Allies, including the United States. The contributors systematically consider how each country dealt with commonly shared problems: the Axis threat to the national order, the extent of military cooperation with the Allies, and the war's impact on the national economy and domestic political and social structures. Drawing on both U.S. and Latin American primary sources, the book offers a rigorous comparison of the wartime experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Central America, Gran Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama, and Puerto Rico.

Reading U.S. Latina Writers

Remapping American Literature

Author: A. Quintana

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 212

View: 836

This essential teaching guide focuses on an emerging body of literature by U.S. Latina and Latin American Women writers. It will assist non-specialist educators in syllabus revision, new course design and classroom presentation. The inclusive focus of the book - that is, combining both US Latina and Latin American women writers - is significant because it introduces a more global and transnational way of approaching the literature. The introduction outlines the major historical experiences that inform the literature, the important genres, periods, movements and authors in its evolution; the traditions and influences that shape the works; and key critical issues of which teachers should be aware. The collection seeks to provide readers with a variety of Latina texts that will guarantee its long-term usefulness to teachers and students of pan-American literature. Because it is no longer possible to understand U.S. Latina literature without taking into consideration the histories and cultures of Latin America, the volume will, through its organization, argue for a more globalized type of analysis which considers the similarities as well as the differences in U.S. and Latin American women's cultural productions. In this context, the term Latina evokes a diasporic, transnational condition in order to address some of the pedagogical issues posed by the bicultural nature which is inherent in pan-American women's literature.

Red and Yellow, Black and Brown

Decentering Whiteness in Mixed Race Studies

Author: Joanne L. Rondilla

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 278

View: 179

Red and Yellow, Black and Brown gathers together life stories and analysis by twelve contributors who express and seek to understand the often very different dynamics that exist for mixed race people who are not part white. The chapters focus on the social, psychological, and political situations of mixed race people who have links to two or more peoples of color— Chinese and Mexican, Asian and Black, Native American and African American, South Asian and Filipino, Black and Latino/a and so on. Red and Yellow, Black and Brown addresses questions surrounding the meanings and communication of racial identities in dual or multiple minority situations and the editors highlight the theoretical implications of this fresh approach to racial studies.

Humanities

Author: Lawrence Boudon

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 978

View: 815

Beginning with volume 41 (1979), the University of Texas Press became the publisher of the Handbook of Latin American Studies, the most comprehensive annual bibliography in the field. Compiled by the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress and annotated by a corps of more than 130 specialists in various disciplines, the Handbook alternates from year to year between social sciences and humanities. The Handbook annotates works on Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and the Guianas, Spanish South America, and Brazil, as well as materials covering Latin America as a whole. Most of the subsections are preceded by introductory essays that serve as biannual evaluations of the literature and research under way in specialized areas. The Handbook of Latin American Studies is the oldest continuing reference work in the field. Lawrence Boudon became the editor in 2000. The subject categories for Volume 58 are as follows: Electronic Resources for the Humanities Art History (including ethnohistory) Literature (including translations from the Spanish and Portuguese) Philosophy: Latin American Thought Music

The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction

Author: Linda Gordon

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 563

In 1904, New York nuns brought forty Irish orphans to a remote Arizona mining camp, to be placed with Catholic families. The Catholic families were Mexican, as was the majority of the population. Soon the town's Anglos, furious at this "interracial" transgression, formed a vigilante squad that kidnapped the children and nearly lynched the nuns and the local priest. The Catholic Church sued to get its wards back, but all the courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, ruled in favor of the vigilantes. The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction tells this disturbing and dramatic tale to illuminate the creation of racial boundaries along the Mexican border. Clifton/Morenci, Arizona, was a "wild West" boomtown, where the mines and smelters pulled in thousands of Mexican immigrant workers. Racial walls hardened as the mines became big business and whiteness became a marker of superiority. These already volatile race and class relations produced passions that erupted in the "orphan incident." To the Anglos of Clifton/Morenci, placing a white child with a Mexican family was tantamount to child abuse, and they saw their kidnapping as a rescue. Women initiated both sides of this confrontation. Mexican women agreed to take in these orphans, both serving their church and asserting a maternal prerogative; Anglo women believed they had to "save" the orphans, and they organized a vigilante squad to do it. In retelling this nearly forgotten piece of American history, Linda Gordon brilliantly recreates and dissects the tangled intersection of family and racial values, in a gripping story that resonates with today's conflicts over the "best interests of the child."

Beyond Slavery

The Multilayered Legacy of Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: Darién J. Davis

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 755

Beyond Slavery traces the enduring impact and legacy of the African diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean in the modern era. In a rich set of essays, the volume explores the multiple ways that Africans have affected political, economic, and cultural life throughout the region. Focusing on areas traditionally associated with Afro-Latin American culture such as Brazil and the Caribbean basin, this innovative work also highlights places such as Rio de La Plata and Central America, where the African legacy has been important but little studied. The contributors engage readers interested in the African diaspora in a series of vigorous debates ranging from agency and resistance to transculturation, displacement, cross-national dialogue, and popular culture. Documenting the array of diverse voices of Afro-Latin Americans throughout the region, this interdisciplinary book brings to life both their histories and contemporary experiences. Contributions by: Aviva Chomsky, Darién J. Davis, Dario Euraque, Sujatha Fernandes, David Geggus, Aline Helg, Ricardo D. Salvatore, Eduardo Silva, Jason Stanyek, Camilla Townsend, Bobby Vaughn, Ben Vinson III, and Judith Michelle Williams