Urban Myths about Learning and Education

Author: Pedro De Bruyckere

Publisher: Academic Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 226

View: 471

Many things people commonly believe to be true about education are not supported by scientific evidence. Urban Myths about Learning and Education examines commonly held incorrect beliefs and then provides the truth of what research has shown. Each chapter examines a different myth, with sections on learning, the brain, technology, and educational policy. A final section discusses why these myths are so persistent. Written in an engaging style, the book separates fact from fiction regarding learning and education. Recognize any of these myths? People have different styles of learning Boys are naturally better at mathematics than girls We only use 10% of our brains The left half of the brain is analytical, the right half is creative Men have a different kind of brain from women We can learn while we are asleep Babies become smarter if they listen to classical music These myths and more are systematically debunked, with useful correct information about the topic in question. Debunks common myths about learning and education Provides empirical research on the facts relating to the myths Utilizes light-hearted, approachable language for easy reading

Foundations of Education Research

Understanding Theoretical Components

Author: Joy Egbert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 186

View: 335

Now in its second edition, Foundations of Education Research defines, discusses, and offers applications for the central components of educational research, providing both novice and experienced researchers with a common ground from which to work. Fully updated throughout, the 2nd edition adds a glossary of terms, additional examples, and includes a discussion of similarities and differences in education research. Eight concise, accessible chapters cover conceptual framework, epistemology, paradigm, theory, theoretical framework, and methodology/method. This unique primer demystifies jargon and makes the theoretical components of research accessible, giving students the tools they need to understand existing education research literature and to produce theoretically-grounded work of their own. Each chapter begins with perspectives from both novice and experienced researchers, whose guiding questions assist researchers engaging with theory for the first time and those looking to improve their understanding of the fundamentals. Practice exercises, examples, and suggested reading lists at the end of each chapter offer students resources they can apply to their own research and thinking in concrete ways. A perfect accompaniment to standard research courses, this book is designed to help students achieve a deeper understanding of what is expected of them and ideas about how to achieve it.

Using Games and Simulations for Teaching and Assessment

Key Issues

Author: Harold F. O'Neil

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 336

View: 193

Using Games and Simulations for Teaching and Assessment: Key Issues comprises a multidisciplinary investigation into the issues that arise when using games and simulations for educational purposes. Using both theoretical and empirical analyses, this collection examines cognitive, motivational, and psychometric issues with a focus on STEM content. Unlike other research-based volumes that focus solely on game design or the theoretical basis behind gaming, this book unites previously disparate communities of researchers—from civilian to military contexts as well as multiple disciplines—to critically explore current problems and illustrate how instructionally effective games and simulations should be planned and evaluated. While computer-based simulations and games have the potential to improve the quality of education and training, Using Games and Simulations for Teaching and Assessment: Key Issues shows how the science of learning should underlie the use of such technologies. Through a wide-ranging yet detailed examination, chapter authors provide suggestions for designing and developing games, simulations, and intelligent tutoring systems that are scientifically-based, outcomes-driven, and cost-conscious.

Teaching and Researching Computer-assisted Language Learning

Author: Ken Beatty

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 259

View: 209

Computers increasingly play an important role in education, particularly language learning. But Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) is constantly undergoing change because of technological advances that create opportunities to revisit old ideas, to conduct new research and to challenge established beliefs about the ways in which teaching and learning can be carried out both with and without a human teacher. This book offers teachers and researchers a better understanding of CALL through: A comprehensive overview of CALL Step-by-step instructions on conducting research projects in CALL Extensive resources in the form of contacts, websites and free software references A glossary of terms related to CALL CALL is a field tied closely to other areas of study within applied linguistics such as autonomy in language learning, as well as to the teaching of particular language skills. It also reaches out to other disciplines such as computer science. Exploring research opportunities and practice in CALL encourages innovation, both in the use of new technology and in our ways of working imaginatively with it to create new learning opportunities. Dr Ken Beatty is Senior Lecturer for Information Technology in the Division of Languages at City University of Hong Kong.

More Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends

Doctrine, Verity and Fable in Organizational and Social Sciences

Author: Charles E. Lance

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 358

View: 150

This book provides an up-to-date review of commonly undertaken methodological and statistical practices that are based partially in sound scientific rationale and partially in unfounded lore. Some examples of these “methodological urban legends” are characterized by manuscript critiques such as: (a) “your self-report measures suffer from common method bias”; (b) “your item-to-subject ratios are too low”; (c) “you can’t generalize these findings to the real world”; or (d) “your effect sizes are too low.” What do these critiques mean, and what is their historical basis? More Statistical and Methodological Myths and Urban Legends catalogs several of these quirky practices and outlines proper research techniques. Topics covered include sample size requirements, missing data bias in correlation matrices, negative wording in survey research, and much more.

Literacy Teaching and Learning in Rural Communities

Problematizing Stereotypes, Challenging Myths

Author: Lisa Schade Eckert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 144

View: 821

This definitive look at teaching English in rural secondary schools contests current definitions and discussions of rural education, examines their ideological and cultural foundations, and presents an alternative perspective that conceptualizes rural communities as diverse, unique, and conducive to pedagogical and personal growth in teaching and learning. Authentic narratives document individual teachers’ moments of struggle and success in learning to understand, value, and incorporate rural literacies and sensibilities into their curricula. The teachers‘ stories and the scholarly analysis of issues raised through them illuminate the unique challenges and rewards of teaching English in a rural school and offer helpful insights and knowledge for navigating the pedagogical landscape.

The Science and Psychology of Music Performance

Creative Strategies for Teaching and Learning

Author: Richard Parncutt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 400

View: 401

What type of practice makes a musician perfect? What sort of child is most likely to succeed on a musical instrument? What practice strategies yield the fastest improvement in skills such as sight-reading, memorization, and intonation? Scientific and psychological research can offer answers to these and other questions that musicians face every day. In The Science and Psychology of Music Performance, Richard Parncutt and Gary McPherson assemble relevant current research findings and make them accessible to musicians and music educators. This book describes new approaches to teaching music, learning music, and making music at all educational and skill levels. Each chapter represents the collaboration between a music researcher (usually a music psychologist) and a performer or music educator. This combination of expertise results in excellent practical advice. Readers will learn, for example, that they are in the majority (57%) if they experience rapid heartbeat before performances; the chapter devoted to performance anxiety will help them decide whether beta-blocker medication, hypnotherapy, or the Alexander Technique of relaxation might alleviate their stage fright. Another chapter outlines a step-by-step method for introducing children to musical notation, firmly based on research in cognitive development. Altogether, the 21 chapters cover the personal, environmental, and acoustical influences that shape the learning and performance of music.

Building Mathematics Learning Communities

Improving Outcomes in Urban High Schools

Author: Erica N. Walker

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 169

View: 691

“Opportunity to learn (OTL) factors interact and ultimately influence mathematics achievement. Many important OTL interactions take place in school settings. This volume provides insights into the role of peer interactions in the mathematics learning process. The analysis describes with a sense of purpose a topic that is typically overlooked in discussions of mathematics reform. The case study is an important contribution to the urban mathematics education literature.” —William F. Tate, Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis Drawing on perceptions, behaviors, and experiences of students at an urban high school—both high and low achievers—this timely book demonstrates how urban youth can be meaningfully engaged in learning mathematics. The author presents a “potential” model rather than a “deficit” model, complete with teaching strategies and best practices for teaching mathematics in innovative and relevant ways. This resource offers practical insights for pre- and inservice teachers and administrators on facilitating positive interactions, engagement, and achievement in mathematics, particularly with Black and Latino/a students. It also examines societal perceptions of urban students and how these affect teaching and learning, policies, and mathematics outcomes. Based on extensive research in urban high schools, the author identifies three key principles that must be understood for teachers and students to build strong mathematics communities. They are: Urban students want to be a part of academically challenging environments. Teachers and administrators can inadvertently create obstacles that thwart the mathematics potential of students. Educators can build on existing student networks to create collaborative and non-hierarchical communities that support mathematics achievement. Erica N. Walker is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Sociocultural Contexts of Language and Literacy

Author: Teresa L. McCarty

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 424

View: 271

Sociocultural Contexts of Language and Literacy, Second Edition engages prospective and in-service teachers in learning about linguistically and culturally diverse students, and in using this knowledge to enrich literacy learning in classrooms and communities. The text is grounded in current research and theory that integrate sociocultural and constructivist concepts and perspectives and provide a framework teachers can use to develop strategies for teaching reading, writing, and thinking to diverse students. The focus on English literacy development does not imply advocacy for "English only" or ESL as the primary mode of literacy instruction. Rather, the authors take the position that learners need to develop literacy in their native language and that the concepts and skills learned in developing the native language create a foundation of strength from which students can develop English literacy. Part I introduces relevant research and language learning theories. Part II provides research reviews and information about literacy learning within specific culturally and linguistically diverse communities. The chapters in Part III challenge the reader to view the multiple social, intellectual, cultural, and language differences children bring to the classroom as an opportunity for learning and building on the diversity among students. Activities and suggested readings at the end of each chapter involve readers in reflection, observation, meaning making, and the construction of application processes for their new understandings. New in the Second Edition: *updated research and theory on multilingual and second language literacy; *a focus on the interpretation of these research findings to make them useful for teachers and teacher educators in understanding and articulating the research bases for literacy practices; *attention to current intensely debated issues, such as standards, the phonics movement, and high-stakes testing; and *new activities and suggested readings.