Unquenchable

America's Water Crisis and What To Do About It

Author: Robert Jerome Glennon

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 427

View: 546

Robert Glennon captures the irony-and tragedy-of America's water crisis in a book that is both frightening and wickedly comical. He proposes market-based solutions that value water as both a commodity and a fundamental human right. One truth runs throughout this book: only when we recognize water's worth will we begin to conserve it.--From the publisher.

Environmental Planning Handbook

Author: Tom Daniels

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 792

View: 587

Environmental protection is a global issue. But most of the action is happening at the local level. How can communities keep their air clean, their water pure, and their people and property safe from climate and environmental hazards? Newly updated, The Environmental Planning Handbook gives local governments, nonprofits, and citizens the guidance they need to create an action plan they can implement now. It’s essential reading for a post-Katrina, post-Sandy world.

Supply Shock

Economic Growth at the Crossroads and the Steady State Solution

Author: Brian Czech

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 468

THE STEADY STATE REVOLUTION -- NAVIGATING THE END OF ECONOMIC GROWTH Supply Shock "clearly describes the heart of what ails us--a zombie-like addiction to economic growth everywhere at all costs. Brian Czech brilliantly dissects the economic theories, models, and mindsets that are diminishing the human prospect while calling it "progress." ... King Midas would have understood the point, as we will someday." -- David W. Orr, Paul Sears Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies and Politics, and Senior Adviser to the President, Oberlin College .".. it's evident that Czech has mastered the art of melding science, economics, policy and politics in one readable piece. Supply Shock belongs in the classroom, boardroom, town halls and policy circles." -- Herman Daly, from the foreword Politicians, economists, and Wall Street would have us believe that limitless expansion is the Holy Grail, and that there is no conflict between growing the economy and protecting the environment. "Supply Shock" debunks this widely accepted myth, leaving no doubt that the biggest idea of the 20th century - economic growth - has now become the biggest problem of the 21st. Starting with a refreshingly accessible, comprehensive critique of "the dismal science," author Brian Czech develops a compelling argument for a steady state economy. Whereas many works of economic thought can be dry and boring, Supply Shock succeeds at engaging readers while conveying keen scientific, economic and political insights including: The "trophic theory of money" The overlooked source of technological progress that prevents us from reconciling growth and environmental protection Bold yet practical policy objectives designed to ease the transition to life after growth. "Required reading for anyone concerned about the world our children and grandchildren will inherit, this landmark work lays a solid foundation for a new economic model, perhaps in time for preventing global catastrophes; certainly in time to mitigate the damage. Czech's vision of "steady statesmanship" is impressive and convincing, and this book easily qualifies as one of the key manuals for those who care about the world and its inhabitants." -- Lynn Gree nwalt, former director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service "An old economic world is dying, and a new economic world is being born. Brian Czech is one of the visionaries..." -- Governor Rich ard D. Lamm Brian Czech is the founder of Center for the Advancement of the Steady State Economy (CASSE), the leading organization promoting the transition from unsustainable growth to a new economic paradigm.

Shopping for Water

How the Market Can Mitigate Water Shortages in the American West

Author: Peter W. Culp

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 41

View: 919

The American West has a long tradition of conflict over water. But after fifteen years of drought across the region, it is no longer simply conflict: it is crisis. In the face of unprecedented declines in reservoir storage and groundwater reserves throughout the West, Shopping for Water focuses on a set of policies that could contribute to a lasting solution: using market forces to facilitate the movement of water resources and to mitigate the risk of water shortages. Shopping for Water begins by reviewing key dimensions of this problem: the challenges of population and economic growth, the environmental stresses from overuse of common water resources, the risk of increasing water-supply volatility, and the historical disjunction that has developed between and among rural and urban water users regarding the amount we consume and the price we pay for water. The authors then turn to five proposals to encourage the broader establishment and use of market institutions to encourage reallocation of water resources and to provide new tools for risk mitigation. Each of the five proposals offers a means of building resilience into our water management systems.

Southern Water, Southern Power

How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region

Author: Christopher J. Manganiello

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 986

Why has the American South--a place with abundant rainfall--become embroiled in intrastate wars over water? Why did unpredictable flooding come to characterize southern waterways, and how did a region that seemed so rich in this all-important resource become derailed by drought and the regional squabbling that has tormented the arid American West? To answer these questions, policy expert and historian Christopher Manganiello moves beyond the well-known accounts of flooding in the Mississippi Valley and irrigation in the West to reveal the contested history of southern water. From the New South to the Sun Belt eras, private corporations, public utilities, and political actors made a region-defining trade-off: The South would have cheap energy, but it would be accompanied by persistent water insecurity. Manganiello's compelling environmental history recounts stories of the people and institutions that shaped this exchange and reveals how the use of water and power in the South has been challenged by competition, customers, constituents, and above all, nature itself.

Bird on Fire

Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City

Author: Andrew Ross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 260

Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights. In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density, such as Portland, Seattle, or New York. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all. Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing in their responsibility to address climate change.

A Great Aridness

Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest

Author: William deBuys

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 760

With its soaring azure sky and stark landscapes, the American Southwest is one of the most hauntingly beautiful regions on earth. Yet staggering population growth, combined with the intensifying effects of climate change, is driving the oasis-based society close to the brink of a Dust-Bowl-scale catastrophe. In A Great Aridness, William deBuys paints a compelling picture of what the Southwest might look like when the heat turns up and the water runs out. This semi-arid land, vulnerable to water shortages, rising temperatures, wildfires, and a host of other environmental challenges, is poised to bear the heaviest consequences of global environmental change in the United States. Examining interrelated factors such as vanishing wildlife, forest die backs, and the over-allocation of the already stressed Colorado River--upon which nearly 30 million people depend--the author narrates the landscape's history--and future. He tells the inspiring stories of the climatologists and others who are helping untangle the complex, interlocking causes and effects of global warming. And while the fate of this region may seem at first blush to be of merely local interest, what happens in the Southwest, deBuys suggests, will provide a glimpse of what other mid-latitude arid lands worldwide--the Mediterranean Basin, southern Africa, and the Middle East--will experience in the coming years. Written with an elegance that recalls the prose of John McPhee and Wallace Stegner, A Great Aridness offers an unflinching look at the dramatic effects of climate change occurring right now in our own backyard.

ABCs of Food

Boost your Energy, Confidence and Success with the Power of Nutrition

Author: Patricia Conlin

Publisher: Patricia Conlin

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 465

View: 761

It doesn’t have to be a gourmet meal or a marathon! Like many of us, Patricia Conlin has had a life-long love of food and eating. But as life got busy with work and family, she cut a few corners to get dinner on the table quickly and keep exercise in her life. While she thought she was still providing healthy meals for her growing young boys, she soon learned the truth. Patricia discovered that mastering a few nutrition and health strategies could dramatically increase her succcess and joy of life. And now she shares these learnings with you in ABCs of Food. This easy-to-read book combines humorous stories with helpful tips and informed insights on a plethora of topics, including agri-business, fighting illness, and improving health, that will increase your energy and improve your confidence and health. A Registered Holistic Nutritionist, Patricia discusses the nutritional content and benefits of eating a colossal number of foods from A to Z. Her section on nutrients gets to the heart of the massive and often confusing information available today. And the recipes will delight your taste buds and inspire you. You’ll want to read ABCs of Food from cover to cover and then keep it on your shelf for easy reference. Discover the powerful link between your health and well being and the food you eat. Patricia Conlin, president and founder of Global Consulting Group Inc., delivers quality solutions for recruitment, retention, and transition. Her passion for health and personal development led her to become a Registered Holistic Nutritionist (RHN). In 2015, Patricia was nominated for a Toronto Business Leader Award for Wellness. She coaches companies and individuals on improving health and success and is an inspirational speaker on a range of health and business topics.

Dam Nation

How Water Shaped the West and Will Determine Its Future

Author: Stephen Grace

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 579

In the scramble to claim water rights in the West during the fevered days of early emigration and expansion, running out of water was rarely a concern, and the dam building fever that transformed the West in the 19th and 20th centuries created a map of the region that may be unsustainable. Throughout the arid American West, metropolitan areas such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Denver need water. These cities are growing, but water supplies are dwindling. Scientists agree that the West is heating up and drying out, leading to future water shortages that will pose a challenge to existing laws. Dam Nation looks first to the past, to the stories of the California gold rush and the earliest attempts by men to shape the landscape and tame it, takes us to the “Great American Desert” and the settlement of the west under the theory that "rain follows the plow," and then takes on the ongoing legal and moral battles in the West. Author Stephen Grace, is a novelist, a storyteller, and the author of several non-fiction books on Colorado. He weaves the facts into a compelling narrative that informs, entertains, and tells an important story.

Relicts of a Beautiful Sea

Survival, Extinction, and Conservation in a Desert World

Author: Christopher Norment

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 229

Along a tiny spring in a narrow canyon near Death Valley, seemingly against all odds, an Inyo Mountain slender salamander makes its home. "The desert," writes conservation biologist Christopher Norment, "is defined by the absence of water, and yet in the desert there is water enough, if you live properly." Relicts of a Beautiful Sea explores the existence of rare, unexpected, and sublime desert creatures such as the black toad and four pupfishes unique to the desert West. All are anomalies: amphibians and fish, dependent upon aquatic habitats, yet living in one of the driest places on earth, where precipitation averages less than four inches per year. In this climate of extremes, beset by conflicts over water rights, each species illustrates the work of natural selection and the importance of conservation. This is also a story of persistence--for as much as ten million years--amid the changing landscape of western North America. By telling the story of these creatures, Norment illustrates the beauty of evolution and explores ethical and practical issues of conservation: what is a four-inch-long salamander worth, hidden away in the heat-blasted canyons of the Inyo Mountains, and what would the cost of its extinction be? What is any lonely and besieged species worth, and why should we care?