Encyclopedia of Tudor England

Author: John A. Wagner

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1302

View: 779

Authority and accessibility combine to bring the history and the drama of Tudor England to life. Almost 900 engaging entries cover the life and times of Henry VIII, Mary I, Elizabeth I, William Shakespeare, and much, much more. * Almost 900 entries covering people, events, ideas, movements, institutions, and publications * An extensive chronology of important events from the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485 to the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 * Maps and photographs * A guide to related topics * Appendixes that include genealogies and lists of European monarchs, contemporary popes, English bishops, speakers and sessions of Parliament, and major battles, rebellions, and uprisings * A bibliography of historical novels set in the period * An annotated list of films and television programs set in the period * A list of useful websites * An extensive, up-to-date bibliography divided into topical sections

The Italian Encounter with Tudor England

A Cultural Politics of Translation

Author: Michael Wyatt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 972

The small but influential community of Italians that took shape in England in the fifteenth century initially consisted of ecclesiastics, humanists, merchants, bankers and artists. However, in the wake of the English Reformation, Italian Protestants joined other continental religious refugees in finding Tudor England to be a hospitable and productive haven, and they brought with them a cultural perspective informed by the ascendency among European elites of their vernacular language. This study maintains that questions of language are at the centre of the circulation of ideas in the early modern period. Wyatt first examines the agency of this shifting community of immigrant Italians in the transmission of Italy's cultural patrimony and its impact on the nascent English nation; Part Two turns to the exemplary career of John Florio, the Italo-Englishman who worked as a language teacher, lexicographer and translator in Elizabethan and Jacobean England.

Tudor England

Author: Peter Brimacombe

Publisher: Jarrold Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 296

The Tudor age was a pivotal period of English history. In little more than a century, the nation was transformed from a medieval kingdom to a modern state, from an insignificant offshore island to a major world power.

Defending Royal Supremacy and Discerning God's Will in Tudor England

Author: Professor Daniel Eppley

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 286

Early modern governments constantly faced the challenge of reconciling their own authority with the will of God. Most acknowledged that an individual's first loyalty must be to God's law, but were understandably reluctant to allow this as an excuse to challenge their own powers where interpretations differed. As such, contemporaries gave much thought to how this potentially destabilising situation could be reconciled, preserving secular authority without compromising conscience. In this book, the particular relationship between the Tudor supremacy over the Church and the hermeneutics of discerning God's will is highlighted and explored. This topic is addressed by considering defences of the Henrician and Elizabethan royal supremacies over the English church, with particular reference to the thoughts and writings of Christopher St. German, and Richard Hooker. Both of these men were in broad agreement that it was the responsibility of English Christians to subordinate their subjective understandings of God's will to the interpretation of God's will propounded by the church authorities. St. German originally put forward the proposition that king in parliament, as the voice of the community of Christians in England, was authorized to definitively pronounce regarding God's will; and that obedience to the crown was in all circumstances commensurate with obedience to God's will. Salvation, as envisioned by St. German and Hooker, was thus not dependent upon adherence to a single true faith. Rather it was conditional upon a sincere effort to try to discern the true faith using the means that God had made available to the individual, particularly the collective wisdom of one's church speaking through its representatives. In tackling this fascinating dichotomy at the heart of early modern government, this study emphasizes an aspect of the defence of royal supremacy that has not heretofore been sufficiently appreciated by modern scholars, and invites consideration of how this aspect of hermeneutics is relevant to wider discussions relating to the nature of secular and divine authority.

Tudor England

An Encyclopedia

Author: Arthur F Kinney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 837

View: 367

This is the first encyclopedia to be devoted entirely to Tudor England. 700 entries by top scholars in every major field combine new modes of archival research with a detailed Tudor chronology and appendix of biographical essays. Entries include: * Edward Alleyn [actor/theatre manager] * Roger Ascham * Bible translation * cloth trade * Devereux family * Espionage * Family of Love * food and diet * James Hepburn, Earl of Bothwell * inns * Ket's Rebellion * John Lyly * mapmaking * Frances Meres * miniature painting * Pavan * Pilgrimage of Grace * Revels Office * Ridolfi plot * Lady Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke * treason * and much more. Also includes an 8-page color insert.

The Development of Natural History in Tudor England

Author: F. David Hoeniger

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 81

View: 370

Folger guides provide lively, authoritative surveys of important aspects of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English cultural history. Attractively illustrated with material from contemporary documents, the Guides are designed for the general reader and are particularly valuable as enrichment resources for courses in Renaissance history and literature.

Reading in Tudor England

Author: Eugene R. Kintgen

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 260

View: 118

Readers in the sixteenth century read (that is, interpreted) texts quite differently from the way contemporary readers do; they were trained to notice different aspects of a text and to process them differently. Using educational works of Erasmus, Ascham, and others, commentaries on literary works, various kinds of religious guides and homilies, and self-improvement books, Kintgen has found specific evidence of these differences and makes imaginative use of it to draw fascinating and convincing conclusions about the art and practice of reading. Kintgen ends by situating the book within literary theory, cognitive science, and literary studies. Among the writers covered are Gabriel Harvey, E. K. (the commentator on The Shepheardes Calendar), Sir John Harrington, George Gascoigne, George Puttenham, Thomas Blundeville, and Angel Day.

Treason in Tudor England

Politics and Paranoia

Author: Lacey Baldwin Smith

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 354

View: 538

Lacey Baldwin Smith re-evaluates the Tudor mania for conspiracy in the light of psychological and social impulses peculiar to the age. Originally published in 1986. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.