The Triumph of Irony in the Book of Judges

Author: Lillian R. Klein

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 260

View: 853

The Triumph of Irony in the Book of Judges focuses on the literary quality of the book of Judges. Klein extrapolates the theme of irony in the book of Judges, seeking to prove that it is the main structural element. She points out how this literary device adds to the overall meaning and tone of the book, and what it reveals about the culture of the time. Chronologically divided into sections, Klein explores the narrative and commentates on the literary properties throughout-plot, character development, and resolution, as well as the main theme of irony.

The Literary Guide to the Bible

Author: Robert Alter

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 678

View: 262

Offers guidance for reading and studying each book of the Old and New Testament.

Power and Politics in the Book of Judges

Men and Women of Valor

Author: John C. Yoder

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 264

John C. Yoder examines political culture and behavior in the book of Judges. Although the Deuteronomistic editor portrayed the "judges" as moral champions, the men and women of valor were preoccupied with the problem of gaining and maintaining political power. They were ambitious, at times ruthless; they might be labeled chiefs, strongmen, or even warlords in today's world, using violence, patronage, and the control of the labor and reproductive capacity of subordinates, as well as other strategies that did not require the constant exercise of force.

The Rhetoric of the Book of Judges

Author: O'Connell

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 568

View: 695

This volume describes how Judges' rhetorical devices (e.g., narrative analogy, entrapment, foreshadowing) inspire its readers to support a divinely appointed Judahite king who endorses the deuteronomic agenda, and illustrates a new method for understanding how plot-layered stories work.

Judges

A Pastoral and Contextual Commentary

Author: Athena E. Gorospe

Publisher: Langham Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 835

The book of Judges marks an important transition in the life of Israel. It shows the cycle of deviancy and repentance, heroic actions and social collapse, the misuse of power and the marginalization of God. This commentary seeks to help readers navigate the many strange stories and characters of Judges by providing an overall framework for reading it and by explaining a way of entering its stories so that they can be appropriated in an Asian context. This commentary challenges the reader to pray and work for a spiritual revitalization, building a new social fabric in a world marked by injustice, pragmatism, and the loss of a God-centered way of life.

The Completion of Judges

Strategies of Ending in Judges 17-21

Author: David J. H. Beldman

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 505

The last five chapters of the book of Judges (chs. 17-21) contain some shocking and bizarre stories, and precisely how these stories relate to the rest of the book is a major question in scholarship on the book. Leveraging work from literary studies and hermeneutics, Beldman reexamines Judges 17-21 with the aim of discerning the "strategies of ending" that are at work in these chapters. The author identifies and describes a number of strategies of ending in Judges 17-21, including the strategy of completion, the strategy of circularity, and the strategy of entrapment. The temporal configuration of Judges and especially the nonlinear chronology that chapters 17-21 expose also receive due attention. All of this offers fresh insights into the place and function of Judges 17-21 in the context of the whole book.

Interludes and Irony in the Ancestral Narrative

Author: Jonathan A. Kruschwitz

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 227

The stories of Hagar, Dinah, and Tamar stand out as strangers in the ancestral narrative. They deviate from the main plot and draw attention to the interests and fates of characters who are not a part of the ancestral family. Readers have traditionally domesticated these strange stories. They have made them “familiar”—all about the ancestral family. Thus Hagar’s story becomes a drama of deselection, Shechem and the Hivites become emblematic for ancestral conflict with the people of the land, and Tamar becomes a lens by which to read providence in the story of Joseph. This study resurrects the question of these stories’ strangeness. Rather than allow the ancestral narrative to determine their significance, it attends to each interlude’s particularity and detects ironic gestures made toward the ancestral narrative. These stories contain within them the potential to defamiliarize key themes of ancestral identity: the ancestral-divine relationship, ancestral relations to the land and its inhabitants, and ancestral self-identity. Perhaps the ancestral family are not the only privileged partners of God, the only heirs to the land, or the only bloodline fit to bear the next generation.

A Feminist Companion to Judges

Author: Athalya Brenner-Idan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 210

Judges is a book with much to say about women, especially about their fate in a masculine world, subject to male values. This sparkling new collection of studies subjects Achsah, Delilah and Jephthah's daughter to the female critical gaze, while an increased emphasis on the body (whether gendered or not), violence of various forms, and intertextuality reflect the growing importance of these issues in biblical exegesis. The contributors to this second Judges Companion are Lillian Klein, Claudia Rakel, Shulamit Valler, Phyllis Silverman Kramer, Carol Smith, Renate Jost, Ilse Müllner and Alice Bach.

Rewriting Masculinity

Gideon, Men, and Might

Author: Kelly J. Murphy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 562

Who is the biblical Gideon? A mighty warrior, or a fearful son? Hesitant solider, clever tactician, commanding father, ruthless killer, idolater, or illegitimate king? Gideon has long challenged readers of the book of Judges. How did so many conflicting portraits become inscribed in our biblical text and its reception? What might these portraits tell us about the authors, editors, and interpreters of Gideon's story-especially their expectations for men? Rewriting Masculinity interweaves redaction criticism, reception history, and masculinity studies to explore how Gideon's image changes from a mighty warrior to a weakling, from a successful leader to a man who led Israel astray. Kelly J. Murphy first considers the ways that older traditions about Gideon were rewritten throughout ancient Israel's history, sometimes in order to align the story of Gideon with new ideas about what it meant to act like a man. At other times, she shows that the story of Gideon was used to explain why older standards of masculinity no longer worked in new contexts. Murphy then traces how some later interpreters, from the ancient to the contemporary, continually rewrote Gideon in light of their own models for men, might, and masculinity. Murphy offers an in-depth case study of how a biblical text was continuously updated. Emphasizing the importance of reading biblical stories and expansions alongside their later reception, she shows that the story of Gideon the mighty warrior is, in many ways, the story of masculinity in miniature: a constantly-transforming construct.

Judges, Ruth

Revised Edition

Author: K. Lawson Younger

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 640

View: 645

The NIV Application Commentary helps you communicate and apply biblical text effectively in today's context The books of Judges and Ruth have relevance for our lives today. Judges, because it reveals a God who employs very human deliverers but refuses to gloss over their sins and their consequences. And Ruth, because it demonstrates the far-reaching impact of a righteous character. K. Lawson Younger Jr. shares literary perspectives on the books of Judges and Ruth that reveal ageless truths for our contemporary lives. To bring the ancient messages of the Bible into today's context, each passage is treated in three sections: Original Meaning. Concise exegesis to help readers understand the original meaning of the biblical text in its historical, literary, and cultural context. Bridging Contexts. A bridge between the world of the Bible and the world of today, built by discerning what is timeless in the timely pages of the Bible. Contemporary Significance. This section identifies comparable situations to those faced in the Bible and explores relevant application of the biblical messages. The author alerts the readers of problems they may encounter when seeking to apply the passage and helps them think through the issues involved. This unique, award-winning commentary is the ideal resource for today's preachers, teachers, and serious students of the Bible, giving them the tools, ideas, and insights, they need to communicate God's Word with the same powerful impact it had when it was first written.

NIVAC Bundle 2: Historical Books

Author: Robert L. Hubbard, Jr.

Publisher: Zondervan Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 3520

View: 796

This NIVAC Bundle includes the six historical books found in the NIV Application Commentary series.

The Structure and Function of the Prologue of Judges

A Literary-Rhetorical Study of Judges 1:1–3:6

Author: Yohannes Tesfaye Sahile

Publisher: Langham Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 220

View: 726

In this book, Yohannes Sahile tackles the problem of Judges’ prologue, proposing that it is a single introduction with a narrative trajectory that begins with the death of Joshua. The prologue captures how, during the period of testing, the generation after Joshua’s death failed in their commission to take possession of the land allocated to them. Instead they lived with and made a covenant with the pre-existing inhabitants of the land promised to Israel. Judges 1:1–3:6 is often understood as a double introduction to the book, but here Dr Sahile presents a well-argued alternative. He thoroughly dissects the passage in question, adding to ongoing scholarship of Judges and bringing new insight to our understanding of the development of the nation of Israel in the Promised Land.

Judges and Ruth

Author: Victor H. Matthews

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 270

View: 698

Sample Text

Yahweh Versus Baalism

A Theological Reading of the Gideon-Abimelech Narrative

Author: Wolfgang Bluedorn

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 425

The author uses a literary-theological approach to argue that the main theme of the combined Gideon-Abimelech narrative is a theological one, where the narrator demonstrates Yahweh's supreme power and contrasts it with the absence of Baal, the representative of foreign gods. While the Gideon narrative focuses on Yahweh and the illustration of his power and contrasts it with Gideon's limited capacities, the Abimelech narrative demonstrates Baal's absence, Baalism's disastrous potential, and Yahweh's continued control over the events. Hence Gideon's victory over the Midianites and Abimelech's kingship serve only as the tangible instruments by which a single abstract theological theme becomes narratable.

A Commentary on Judges and Ruth

Author: Robert B. Chisholm Jr.

Publisher: Kregel Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 688

View: 151

A thorough exegetical and homiletical analysis of each passage of Judges and Ruth This masterly commentary sheds exegetical and theological light on the books of Judges and Ruth for contemporary preachers and students of Scripture. Listening closely to the text while interacting with the best of scholarship, Chisholm shows what the text meant for ancient Israel and what it means for us today. In addition to its perceptive comments on the biblical text, it examines a host of themes such as covenants and the sovereignty of God in Judges, and providence, redemption, lovingkindness, and Christological typology in Ruth. In his introduction to Judges, Chisholm asks and answers some difficult questions: What is the point of Judges? What role did individual judges play? What part did female characters play? Did Judges have a political agenda? Chisholm offers astute guidance to preachers and teachers wanting to do a series on Judges or Ruth by providing insightful exegetical and theological commentary. He offers homiletical trajectories for each passage to show how historical narrative can be presented in the pulpit and classroom.

Tamar’s Tears

Evangelical Engagements with Feminist Old Testament Hermeneutics

Author: Andrew Sloane

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 398

View: 710

Evangelical and feminist approaches to Old Testament interpretation often seem to be at odds with each other. The authors of this volume argue to the contrary: feminist and evangelical interpreters of the Old Testament can enter into a constructive dialogue that will be fruitful to both parties. They seek to illustrate this with reference to a number of texts and issues relevant to feminist Old Testament interpretation from an explicitly evangelical point of view. In so doing they raise issues that need to be addressed by both evangelical and feminist interpreters of the Old Testament, and present an invitation to faithful and fruitful reading of these portions of Scripture.

Theological Interpretation of the Old Testament

A Book-by-Book Survey

Author:

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 129

The groundbreaking Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible (DTIB) introduced readers to key names, theories, and concepts in the field of biblical interpretation. It has been well received by pastors and students, won book awards from Christianity Today and the Catholic Press Association, and was named the ECPA 2006 Christian Book of the Year. Theological Interpretation of the Old Testament features key articles from DTIB, providing readers with a book-by-book theological reading of the Old Testament. The articles are authored by leading scholars, including Daniel I. Block, Tremper Longman III, J. Gordon McConville, Walter Moberly, Richard Schultz, and Gordon J. Wenham. This handy and affordable text will work particularly well for students in Old Testament/Bible survey courses, pastors, and lay readers.

Jacob and the Angel: Modern Readers and the Old Testament

Author: Sheldon Greaves

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 895

The Old Testament is a cornerstone of western civilization. However, reading it can become a wrestling match with a very eccentric and challenging text. This collection of essays by noted modern biblical scholars presents the methods and findings of current biblical scholarship for a general audience. Whether you are a seasoned reader of the Bible or encountering this remarkable book for the first time, here you will find the current scholarship about the history, transmission, background, development, and interpretation of the Old Testament. Scholars include Karl Sandberg, William Dozeman, Diana Edelman, Marvin Sweeney, William Dever, Russell Fuller, Richard Clifford, Carole Fontaine, and Sheldon Greaves.

History and Interpretation

Essays in Honour of John H. Hayes

Author: M. Patrick Graham

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 267

View: 644

History and Interpretation is a collection of seventeen essays on the Old Testament and the history of ancient Israel and commemorates the sixtieth birthday of John H. Hayes, Professor of Old Testament at Candler School of Theology (Emory University). All the contributors were Hayes's doctoral students at Emory, and their essays cover a wide range of topics that reflect their teachers own scholarly interests-from historical geography and the history of ancient Israel to religion, theology, and the exegesis of individual texts. The methodologies employed are equally diverse: some focus on text-critical or form-critical issues, while others are essentially historical, rhetorical, or literary critical studies. Three essays are devoted to the Pentateuch, three to the Historical Books, four to the Prophets, and seven to the history of ancient Israel. A bibliography of Professor Hayes's publications is also included.

Violence in the Hebrew Bible

Between Text and Reception

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 452

View: 524

In Violence in the Hebrew Bible texts of violence in the Hebrew Bible and their reception history are discussed. The central question of the essays is how to allow for a given text’s plurality of possible and realised meanings while also retaining the ability to form critical judgments regarding biblical exegesis.