Traditional Chinese Architecture

Twelve Essays

Author: Xinian Fu

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 448

View: 586

A groundbreaking book by one of the world's leading historians of Chinese architecture Translated by Alexandra Harrer. Fu Xinian is considered by many to be the world's leading historian of Chinese architecture. He is an expert on every type of Chinese architecture from every period through the nineteenth century, and his work is at the cutting edge of the field. Traditional Chinese Architecture gathers together, for the first time in English, twelve seminal essays by Fu Xinian. This wide-ranging book pays special attention to the technical aspects of the building tradition since the first millennium BC, and Fu Xinian's signature drawings abundantly illustrate its nuances. The essays delve into the modular basis for individual structures, complexes, and cities; lateral and longitudinal building frames; the unity of sculpture and building to create viewing angles; the influence of Chinese construction on Japanese architecture; and the reliability of images to inform us about architecture. Organized chronologically, the book also examines such topics as the representation of architecture on vessels in the Warring States period, early Buddhist architecture, and the evolution of imperial architecture from the Tang to Ming dynasty. A biography of Fu Xinian and a detailed Chinese-English glossary are included. Bringing together some of the most groundbreaking scholarship in Chinese architectural history, Traditional Chinese Architecture showcases an uncontested master of the discipline.

Traditional Chinese Architecture and Planning. China's perception of "Space" and "City"

Author: Felix Wernisch

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 9

View: 490

Seminar paper from the year 2018 in the subject Art - Architecture / History of Construction, grade: 1.0, Vienna University of Technology, course: Traditional Chinese Architecture and Planning, language: English, abstract: Anywhere in the world space is the core of architecture and urban planning. In China space was and perhaps still is clearly defined and distinct, but at the same time, boundless and seemingly empty. In imperial China, city planning and especially the design of the capital were highly symbolic and crucial for living in harmony with the universe. A discussion. The first part of the paper is concerned with explaining how "space" has been defined in Chinese urban planning and architecture from ancient times until today. The second part of the paper is about the city, its symbolism and the importance of Chinese cities in ancient years compared to today.

Chinese Architecture

Author: 蔡燕歆

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 178

View: 412

Ancient Chinese architecture is not only a source of reference for modern Chinese design, it has also had an international influence and attracted global attention. Moreover, architectural remains in China reveal much about the history of this ancient civilisation. The palaces, gardens, temples, tombs and dwellings of the Chinese people reflect, for example, the military achievements of the Qin emperor, the spirit of the Tang Dynasty, the palace intrigues of the Ming Dynasty, the diversity of Chinese culture through the ages and the skill of countless generations of craftsmen and labourers. Chinese Architecture provides an accessible, illustrated introduction to this essential part of China's cultural heritage.

Chinese Architecture

A History

Author: Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page:

View: 210

An unprecedented survey of the origins and evolution of Chinese architecture, from the last millennia BCE to today Throughout history, China has maintained one of the world’s richest built civilizations. The nation’s architectural achievements range from its earliest walled cities and the First Emperor’s vision of city and empire, to bridges, pagodas, and the twentieth-century constructions of the Socialist state. In this beautifully illustrated book, Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt presents the first fully comprehensive survey of Chinese architecture in any language. With rich political and historical context, Steinhardt covers forty centuries of architecture, from the genesis of Chinese building through to the twenty-first century and the challenges of urban expansion and globalism. Steinhardt follows the extraordinary breadth of China’s architectural legacy—including excavation sites, gardens, guild halls, and relief sculpture—and considers the influence of Chinese architecture on Japan, Korea, Mongolia, and Tibet. Architectural examples from Chinese ethnic populations and various religions are examined, such as monasteries, mosques, observatories, and tombs. Steinhardt also shows that Chinese architecture is united by a standardized system of construction, applicable whether buildings are temples, imperial palaces, or shrines. Every architectural type is based on the models that came before it, and principles established centuries earlier dictate building practices. China’s unique system has allowed its built environment to stand as a profound symbol of Chinese culture. With unprecedented breadth united by a continuous chronological narrative, Chinese Architecture offers the best scholarship available on this remarkable subject for scholars, students, and general readers.

Parametric Design in Traditional Chinese Architecture

Author: Rensa Guo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 32

View: 966

The International style of modern architecture is called ‘universal’. In today’s global practice of architecture, architecture studios around the world take part in global architecture competitions designing buildings that look similar to one region and transplanting them to a different continent. These ‘global’ designs lack response to the culture of diverse regions and its historical civilizations. In China today, there is resistance to change while the global exchange is happening. While monolithic brutalistic towers replace indigenous villages, in Beijing, some Chinese architects attempt to rebuild old traditions of courtyard houses and hutong. In southern China, many traditional style Chinese buildings are designed and constructed. In resistance, the Chinese aesthetic is leaning towards traditional culture in the last ten years. Looking through the history of Chinese architecture. There are missing links between the old and the new architecture. Before the 1900s, there were no professional architects in China. The only one permitted to design and build a building was the carpenter. There are higher and lower level carpenters. higher level carpenters design great traditional Chinese buildings like temples and palaces working for the government and the emperor. Lower level carpenters design and build houses for civilians. All carpenters follow the standards of Building Formulas, learning from older carpenters. In the 1900s, Chinese architecture was influenced by the modernism of the western world. There was no transition in between. Chinese architecture jumped from traditional directly to modernism with no translation. Since the 1990’s new style in Chinese architecture is called Chinese modernism. It combines the space of modernism and the shape of traditional Chinese style together. The traditional Chinese style is reduced to mere decoration but is not the core of its design. (This is much like the US post Modern Period of the 65-90’ s) Now, more Chinese architects focus on the expression of the oriental philosophy in architecture. The traditional Chinese style is no longer just decoration but united with a reflection of space and environment. As Chinese architects return to not copying the past, nor decorating with the style, but addressing Chinese cultural relationships with space and the environment, a new Chinese architecture of contemporary making technologies looks to define the new Chinese future.

Chang'an Avenue and the Modernization of Chinese Architecture

Author: Shuishan Yu

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 352

View: 694

In this interdisciplinary narrative, the never-ending "completion" of China's most important street offers a broad view of the relationship between art and ideology in modern China. Chang'an Avenue, named after China's ancient capital (whose name means "Eternal Peace"), is supremely symbolic. Running east-west through the centuries-old heart of Beijing, it intersects the powerful north-south axis that links the traditional centers of political and spiritual legitimacy (the imperial Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven). Among its best-known features are Tiananmen Square and the Great Hall of the People, as well as numerous other monuments and prominent political, cultural, financial, and travel-related institutions. Drawing on Chang'an Avenue's historic ties and modern transformations, this study explores the deep structure of the Chinese modernization project, providing both a big picture of Beijing's urban texture alteration and details in the design process of individual buildings. Political winds shift, architectural styles change, and technological innovations influence waves of demolition and reconstruction in this analysis of Chang'an Avenue's metamorphosis. During collective design processes, architects, urban planners, and politicians argue about form, function, and theory, and about Chinese vs. Western and traditional vs. modern style. Every decision is fraught with political significance, from the 1950s debate over whether Tiananmen Square should be open or partially closed; to the 1970s discussion of the proper location, scale, and design of the Mao Memorial/Mausoleum; to the more recent controversy over whether the egg-shaped National Theater, designed by the French architect Paul Andreu, is an affront to Chinese national pride. For more information: http://arthistorypi.org/books/chang-an

Ancient Chinese Architecture

10 Volumes

Author: 孫大章

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 180

View: 338

The sophistication of Ancient Chinese Architecture gives it a special place within the architecture of the world. There are magnificant imperial palaces, solemn and breathtaking imperial tombs, mysterious sacrificial and ancestral altars and temples as well as a variety of vernacular dwellings of natural simplicity. Religious buildings are dotted about the country, with a riotous profusion of Buddhist, Taoist and Islamic temples or mosques. On top of all this, city walls and fortifications, civic buildings for miscellaneous purposes are rich in variety and form impressive landmarks. A fascinating tour of the architectural and artistic highlights of China’s rich cultural heritage in 10 volumes.

A Philosophy of Chinese Architecture

Past, Present, Future

Author: David Wang

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 212

View: 367

A Philosophy of Chinese Architecture: Past, Present, Future examines the impact of Chinese philosophy on China’s historic structures, as well as on modern Chinese urban aesthetics and architectural forms. For architecture in China moving forward, author David Wang posits a theory, the New Virtualism, which links current trends in computational design with long-standing Chinese philosophical themes. The book also assesses twentieth-century Chinese architecture through the lenses of positivism, consciousness (phenomenology), and linguistics (structuralism and poststructuralism). Illustrated with over 70 black-and-white images, this book establishes philosophical baselines for assessing architectural developments in China, past, present and future.

Ancient Chinese Architecture

10 Volumes

Author: Jinghua Ru

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 193

View: 153

The sophistication of Ancient Chinese Architecture gives it a special place within the architecture of the world. There are magnificant imperial palaces, solemn and breathtaking imperial tombs, mysterious sacrificial and ancestral altars and temples as well as a variety of vernacular dwellings of natural simplicity. Religious buildings are dotted about the country, with a riotous profusion of Buddhist, Taoist and Islamic temples or mosques. On top of all this, city walls and fortifications, civic buildings for miscellaneous purposes are rich in variety and form impressive landmarks. A fascinating tour of the architectural and artistic highlights of China’s rich cultural heritage in 10 volumes.

Ancient Chinese Architecture

10 Volumes

Author: Dazhang Sun

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 186

View: 967

The sophistication of Ancient Chinese Architecture gives it a special place within the architecture of the world. There are magnificant imperial palaces, solemn and breathtaking imperial tombs, mysterious sacrificial and ancestral altars and temples as well as a variety of vernacular dwellings of natural simplicity. Religious buildings are dotted about the country, with a riotous profusion of Buddhist, Taoist and Islamic temples or mosques. On top of all this, city walls and fortifications, civic buildings for miscellaneous purposes are rich in variety and form impressive landmarks. A fascinating tour of the architectural and artistic highlights of China’s rich cultural heritage in 10 volumes.

Islamic Buildings

The Architecture of Islamic Mosques in China

Author: Dazhang Sun

Publisher: Cn Times Books

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 191

View: 722

"Islamic Buildings" is a richly illustrated volume that traces the spread of Islam in China, and Islam's influence on ancient Chinese architecture. The introduction of Islamic architecture into China resulted in a unique blending of Chinese and Arab architecture. Islam spread quickly in China, with followers constructing a variety of religious buildings, including scripture halls, halls of prayer, and mausoleums. Tragically, few ancient Chinese mosques have survived to the present. The best examples of Chinese mosques are presented here with 125 color photographs and 20 illustrations and figures, documenting the spectacular interiors and exteriors of mosques that are still standing in China today.

Feng Shui in Chinese Architecture

Author: Evelyn Lip

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish International

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 151

View: 940

Explains the role of feng shui in Chinese architecture, and is one of very few books which deal with the intangible aspects of traditional Chinese architecture and landscape

Colours and Contrast

Ceramic Traditions in Chinese Architecture

Author: Clarence Eng

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 374

View: 899

In Colours and Contrast Clarence Eng covers the social history of architectural ceramics in China, their development both aesthetically (as ornament) and technically (as durable, protective components) in ancient Chinese architecture from palaces and temples to pagodas and screen walls.

Traditional Chinese Villages

Beautiful Nostalgia

Author: Linping Xue

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 672

This book uses the concept of the region to introduce traditional Chinese villages in ten typical areas. Most of the villages have been included in the World Cultural Heritage List or the Tentative List and reflect the diversity of rural and traditional life. Richly illustrated with pictures of architectural decorations, dwellings, day-to-day country life and aerial views of settlements, it not only enhances readers’ knowledge of China’s traditional architectural culture but also provides inspiration for architectural creation. It is a valuable resource for graduate students, lecturers and researchers in the field of traditional villages, heritage conservation and Chinese architectural culture.