Toward a New Science of Instruction

Author: Kate Maloy

Publisher: Department of Education Office of Educational

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 73

View: 508

Research conducted by the National Research Center on Student Learning (NRCSL) is reviewed as it moves toward a new understanding of learning and instruction. Research by the NRCSL into the kind of learning demanded by modern life has been shaped by the understanding, based on earlier research, that knowledge is actively constructed in the mind of the learner, and not just accumulated and stored for use. To engage in the construction of knowledge, learners must eventually attain intellectual independence. A fundamental concern of research at the NRCSL has been the relationship between knowledge and skill in effective learning. The focused and mindful drawing and testing of inferences appear to be powerful skills that may be indispensable to a strong conceptual understanding in school subject matters. This implication is found in the following areas of NRCSL research: (1) building on intuitive understanding of numbers and quantities; (2) linking background knowledge to new knowledge in text comprehension; (3) learning from effective learners in science; and (4) learning about the value of cognitive conflict. Research on teaching is indicating the importance of modeling by the teacher of mindfulness in learning. The outcomes of NRCSL research have the potential to enrich both research and practice, and the success of every school child depends on investigations such as these. (SLD)

Toward a New Science of Instruction

Learning Processes in Mathematics, Science, Social Science and the Comprehension of Texts

Author: Gordon Press Publishers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 299

Toward a New Science of Instruction

Author: Kate Maloy

Publisher: Department of Education Office of Educational

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 73

View: 122

Research conducted by the National Research Center on Student Learning (NRCSL) is reviewed as it moves toward a new understanding of learning and instruction. Research by the NRCSL into the kind of learning demanded by modern life has been shaped by the understanding, based on earlier research, that knowledge is actively constructed in the mind of the learner, and not just accumulated and stored for use. To engage in the construction of knowledge, learners must eventually attain intellectual independence. A fundamental concern of research at the NRCSL has been the relationship between knowledge and skill in effective learning. The focused and mindful drawing and testing of inferences appear to be powerful skills that may be indispensable to a strong conceptual understanding in school subject matters. This implication is found in the following areas of NRCSL research: (1) building on intuitive understanding of numbers and quantities; (2) linking background knowledge to new knowledge in text comprehension; (3) learning from effective learners in science; and (4) learning about the value of cognitive conflict. Research on teaching is indicating the importance of modeling by the teacher of mindfulness in learning. The outcomes of NRCSL research have the potential to enrich both research and practice, and the success of every school child depends on investigations such as these. (SLD)

Toward a New Science of Instruction

Author: Kate Maloy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 73

View: 669

Describes projects undertaken from 1985 to 1990 that examine reasoning and learning processes in mathematics, science, social science, and the comprehension of texts. Emphasizes how students can develop thinking and reasoning kills that allow them to generate deep comprehension even from incomplete information.

Toward a New Science of Educational Testing and Assessment

Author: Harold Berlak

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 235

View: 697

The authors of this book question the assumptions of the psychometric paradigm that underlie virtually all criterion-referenced and standardized tests used in North American schools. They make a compelling case for a new science of educational testing and assessment, one that shifts decision making from central administration to individual schools and communities. Harold Berlak argues that the concept of tests as scientific instruments validated by technical experts is anachronistic and self-contradictory. He makes a case for a contextual paradigm, an approach which assumes that consensus on educational goals and national testing programs is neither possible nor desireable. Assessment practices in a democratic society must acknowledge and affirm differences in values, beliefs, and material interests among individuals and groups over the purposes and practices of schooling.

Transformational Teaching

The Key To Authentic School Improvement

Author: Spencer Barnard

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 90

View: 731

Spencer Barnard, the father of five self-actualizing children, is a lifelong educator with experience as a classroom teacher, principal, district level administrator, educational publisher and college administrator. In this latter position he guided the development of an innovative master's degree program designed to advance the professional skills of K-12 teachers in the use of discovery-type learning experiences, enriched to accomodate students' differing learning styles and develop their higher order thinking skills. More than 1,000 in-service teachers have so far completed this program. Numerous classroom tests of discovery learning units developed by small teams of teachers in this program consistently showed improvements in students' attitudes and classroom performance levels. Barnard currently serves as Executive Director of the Discovery Learning Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the use of active learning methods in the nation's K-12 schools. He can be reached at this e-mail address: [email protected]

Science Education Research and Practice from Japan

Author: Tetsuo Isozaki

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 199

View: 794

This book project poses a major challenge to Japanese science education researchers in order to disseminate research findings on and to work towards maintaining the strength and nature of Japanese science education. It also presents a unique opportunity to initiate change and/or develop science education research in Japan. It provides some historical reasons essential to Japanese students’ success in international science tests such as TIMSS and PISA. Also, it helps to tap the potential of younger generation of science education researchers by introducing them to methods and designs in the research practice.

National Science Education Standards

Draft for Review and Comment Only

Author: National Research Council (U.S.). National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 625

Science Education Research and Practice in Asia

Challenges and Opportunities

Author: Mei-Hung Chiu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 578

View: 509

This book discusses the scope of science education research and practice in Asia. It is divided into five sections: the first consists of nine chapters providing overviews of science education in Asia (China, Lebanon, Macau, Malaysia, Mongolia, Oman, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand). The second section offers chapters on content analysis of research articles, while the third includes three chapters on assessment and curriculum. The fourth section includes four chapters on innovative technology in science education; and the fifth section consists of four chapters on professional development, and informal learning. Each section also has additional chapters providing specific comments on the content. This collection of works provides readers with a starting point to better understand the current state of science education in Asia.

National Science Education Standards

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 295

Americans agree that our students urgently need better science education. But what should they be expected to know and be able to do? Can the same expectations be applied across our diverse society? These and other fundamental issues are addressed in National Science Education Standards--a landmark development effort that reflects the contributions of thousands of teachers, scientists, science educators, and other experts across the country. The National Science Education Standards offer a coherent vision of what it means to be scientifically literate, describing what all students regardless of background or circumstance should understand and be able to do at different grade levels in various science categories. The standards address: The exemplary practice of science teaching that provides students with experiences that enable them to achieve scientific literacy. Criteria for assessing and analyzing students' attainments in science and the learning opportunities that school science programs afford. The nature and design of the school and district science program. The support and resources needed for students to learn science. These standards reflect the principles that learning science is an inquiry-based process, that science in schools should reflect the intellectual traditions of contemporary science, and that all Americans have a role in improving science education. This document will be invaluable to education policymakers, school system administrators, teacher educators, individual teachers, and concerned parents.

Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology

Author: David H. Jonassen

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 1210

View: 364

This edition of this handbook updates and expands its review of the research, theory, issues and methodology that constitute the field of educational communications and technology. Organized into seven sectors, it profiles and integrates the following elements of this rapidly changing field.

Teachable Moments and the Science of Education

Author: Greg Seals

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 202

View: 651

This book develops a general theory of autonomous teaching by examining a mysterious educational idea: the teachable moment. By formulating an understanding of the teachable moment as predicated upon ‘educational energy,’ this book takes up John Dewey’s view of teaching to articulate a law-like, scientifically oriented pedagogical theory. By offering a testable hypothesis about effective teaching through an innovative reading of Dewey’s law, this book also provides insights into changes in school practice and schooling policy consonant with an understanding of teaching as a science.