Toward a New Dimension

Exploring the Nanoscale

Author: Anne Marcovich

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 275

Over the course of the last thirty years, the investigation of objects at the nano scale has rocketed. Nanoscale scientific research has not only powerfully affected the amount and orientation of knowledge, it has perhaps even more significantly redirected the ways in which much research work is carried out, changed scientists' methodology and reasoning processes, and influenced aspects of the structure of career trajectory and the functioning of scientific disciplines. This book identifies key historical moments and episodes in the birth and evolution of nanoscience, discusses the novel repertory of epistemological concerns of practitioners, and signals sociological propensities. As Galileo's telescope explored the moon's surface four hundred years ago, nano instrumentation now makes it possible to see the surface of single molecules. Moreover, practitioners are able to manipulate individual atoms and molecules at will to produce pre-designed synthetic materials, non-existent in nature. The combinatorial of heightened observational capacity and the tailoring of synthetic artificial materials exhibiting hitherto novel physical properties has widened and transformed the worlds of scientific knowledge and technical artefact. This book invites the question: to what extent does nanoscale scientific research constitute a kind of 'scientific revolution'?

Moral Dimension

Toward a New Economics

Author: Amitai Etzioni

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 314

View: 704

Blending elements of psychology, philosophy, and sociology with economics, Etzioni presents a bold new vision of the social sciences - one which proposes that broader moral, social and political concerns modify economic behaviour and shape individual decision-making. In establishing the necessitary of moral and social considerations in economic behaviour, he provides a provocative new framework for a more comprehensive, ethical and realistic approach to the social sciences today.

Evolution and Progress in Democracies

Towards New Foundations of a Knowledge Society

Author: Johann Götschl

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 392

View: 856

In a ground-breaking series of articles, one of them written by a Nobel Laureate, this volume demonstrates the evolutionary dynamic and the transformation of today's democratic societies into scientific-democratic societies. It highlights the progress of modeling individual and societal evaluation by neo-Bayesian utility theory. It shows how social learning and collective opinion formation work, and how democracies cope with randomness caused by randomizers. Nonlinear `evolution equations' and serial stochastic matrices of evolutionary game theory allow us to optimally compute possible serial evolutionary solutions of societal conflicts. But in democracies progress can be defined as any positive, gradual, innovative and creative change of culturally used, transmitted and stored mentifacts (models, theories), sociofacts (customs, opinions), artifacts and technifacts, within and across generations. The most important changes are caused, besides randomness, by conflict solutions and their realizations by citizens who follow democratic laws. These laws correspond to the extended Pareto principle, a supreme, socioethical democratic rule. According to this principle, progress is any increase in the individual and collective welfare which is achieved during any evolutionary progress. Central to evolutionary modeling is the criterion of the empirical realization of computed solutions. Applied to serial conflict solutions (decisions), evolutionary trajectories are formed; they become the most influential causal attractors of the channeling of societal evolution. Democratic constitutions, legal systems etc., store all advantageous, present and past, adaptive, competitive, cooperative and collective solutions and their rules; they have been accepted by majority votes. Societal laws are codes of statutes (default or statistical rules), and they serve to optimally solve societal conflicts, in analogy to game theoretical models or to statistical decision theory. Such solutions become necessary when we face harmful or advantageous random events always lurking at the edge of societal and external chaos. The evolutionary theory of societal evolution in democracies presents a new type of stochastic theory; it is based on default rules and stresses realization. The rules represent the change of our democracies into information, science and technology-based societies; they will revolutionize social sciences, especially economics. Their methods have already found their way into neural brain physiology and research into intelligence. In this book, neural activity and the creativity of human thinking are no longer regarded as linear-deductive. Only evolutive nonlinear thinking can include multiple causal choices by many individuals and the risks of internal and external randomness; this serves the increasing welfare of all individuals and society as a whole. Evolution and Progress in Democracies is relevant for social scientists, economists, evolution theorists, statisticians, philosophers, philosophers of science, and interdisciplinary researchers.

Dimensions of a New Identity

Author: Erik H. Erikson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 129

View: 546

The two lectures presented in this important volume were delivered by Erik H. Erikson at the second annual Jefferson Lectures in the Humanities, sponsored by The National Endowment for the Humanitites. In the first lecture, entitled "The Founders: Jeffersonion Action and Faith," Erikson uses selected themes from Jefferson's life to illustrate some principles of psychohistory. In the second lecture, "The Inheritors: Modern Insight and Foresight," Erikson applied his main concepts to the problems of ongoing history. The title of the lectures contains one such concept. "New identity" is the result of radical historical change and is here meant to characterize the emerging American identity as first embodied in such men as Jefferson. Erikson first explores certain themes in his examination of the emerging American identity during Jefferson's time. He then attempts to relate the Jeffersonian themes to contemporary problems of repression and suppression, of moralistic vindication, and true liberation by insight. Finally, Erikson maintains that now that children will be born by the privileged choice of parental persons, an adult environment fitting the living and the to-be-living becomes an ethical necessity. There is no question that this work ranks among Erikson's most challenging and seminal books.

Toward a New National Weather Service

Assessment of NEXRAD Coverage and Associated Weather Services

Author: National Research Council (U.S.). NEXRAD Panel

Publisher: National Academies

ISBN:

Category: Meteorological services

Page: 104

View: 239

Tarot D'Amour

Find Love, Sex, and Romance in the Cards

Author: Kooch Daniels

Publisher: Weiser Books

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 256

View: 233

"Our focus is on presenting material that soothes, stimulates, and awakens emotional and sexual understanding through learning and interpreting the Tarot", write the card reading husband and wife team in which they share more than a quarter century experience with the tarot and as life partners. Begin with the simple, yet never-before-written-about premise- every card and its reverse have romantic and sexual indications. And whether you're a newcomer to tarot, a longtime student, or somewhere in-between, Tarot d'Amour will unveil a whole new way to interpret the cards.

Pakistan-Japan Relations

Continuity and Change in Economic Relations and Security Interests

Author: Ahmad Rashid Malik

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 931

This is the first book-length study to explain the complex nature of Pakistan-Japan relations. It analyses the evolution and development of relations between the two countries by defining two key factors: economic interests and security concerns in the US-led global security system. Providing a thorough analysis of the history of relations between the countries, the important role Pakistan played in the context of peace and conflict resolution in East Asia during 1947-52, which helped ending the Occupation of Japan and restoring the country’s post-war economy, is highlighted. Pakistan then emerged as the largest trading partner of Japan only after the United States. It was Pakistan’s benevolent role that helped Japan to comeback to Asia in the 1950s as the author explains these events in greater detail that are not commonly known. In the 1960s and also in the 1980s during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, Pakistan emerged as one of the largest recipients of Japanese aid. The author explains that Japanese strategic aid to Pakistan was diverted to strengthen democratic values and institutions after the end of the Cold War. He then clarifies that Pakistan-Japan relations were dominated by two main issues during the 1990s, Japanese economic cooperation in Pakistan's trade liberalization, and suspicion about Pakistan's nuclear program. In conclusion, the author states that there has been a remarkable continuity in the area of economic relations, though there have been changes in security concerns. The book sets out future prospects for economic and diplomatic relations between the two countries, and it will be of interest to academics working in the field of International Relations, International Political Economy, and Asian Studies. For intellectuals, diplomats, and businessmen, the book would be a handy reference.

Doing Phenomenology

Essays on and in Phenomenology

Author: E. Spiegelberg

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 290

View: 464

Substantial encouragement for this volume came from the editors and readers of the Studies for Phenomenological and Existential Philosophy (SPEP) at Northwestern University Press. But its publi cation has been made possible only by the unqualified and un abridged acceptance of the Editorial Board of Phaenomen%gica, which at the time was still headed by its founder, the late Professor H. L. Van Breda, who welcomed the manuscript most generously. This makes his untimely passing even more grievous to me. The stylistic copy editing and proof reading were handled ef ficiently by Ruth Nichols Jackson, secretary of the Philosophy Department. In the proof reading I also had the able help of my colleague Stanley Paulson. I dedicate this book to the memory of my late brother, Dr. chern. Erwin Spiegelberg, at the time of his death assistant professor at the University of Rio de Janeiro, who preceded me by two years in emigrating from Nazi Germany. When in 1938 he put an end to his life in an apparent depression, he also did so in order not to become a burden to his brothers, who were on the point of following him. Whatever I, more privileged in health and in opportunities in the country of my adoption, have been able to do and achieve since then has been done with a sense of a debt to him and of trying to live and work for him too.

Proximity Levinas, Blanchot, Bataille and Communication

Author: Joseph Libertson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 356

View: 898

The problematic reality of an alterity implicit in the concept of communication has been a consistent attestation in formal discourse. The rapport of thought to this alterity has been consistently described as a radical inadequation. By virtue of the communicational economy which produces discontinuity and relation, illumination and the possibility of consciousness, an opacity haunts the famili arity of comprehension. Consciousness' spontaneity is limited by the difference or discontinuity of the exterior thing, of the exterior subject or intersubjective other, and of the generality of existence in its excess over comprehension's closure. An element implicit in difference or discontinuity escapes the power of comprehension, and even the possibility of manifestation. Within the system of tendencies and predications which characterizes formal discourse, however, this escape of alterity is most often understood as an escape which proceeds from its own substantiality: the unknowable in-itself of things, of subjects, and of generality. Alterity escapes the power of comprehension, on the basis of its power to escape this power. That which escapes the effectivity of consciousness, escapes on the basis of its own effectivity. For this reason, the rapport of inadequation described by the escape may function in formal discourse as a correlation. The inadequation of comprehension and exteriority may function as the vicissitude of a larger adequation. The latent principles of this adequation are power and totalization.