Times of War Collection

Author: Michael Morpurgo

Publisher: Anthony D. Bunting

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 196

A stunning paperback collection of classic Morpurgo novels set in World War I, World War II and the Afghanistan conflict. Told in the voice of a young soldier, Private Peaceful follows twenty-four hours in his life at the front during WW I, capturing his memories as he looks back over his life. It’s both a love story and a deeply moving account of the horrors of the First World War. In An Elephant in the Garden, Elizabeth's father is fighting on the eastern front in WW II and her mother is working at Dresden zoo when the bombs start to fall. Their home destroyed, Elizabeth’s family must flee through the wintery landscape, avoiding the Russian troops who are drawing ever closer. It would be hard enough, without an elephant in tow… Shadow is the story of Aman, a boy from Afghanistan fleeing the horror of war. A western dog shows up outside the caves where Aman lives with his mother. When they finally decide to make a bid for freedom, Shadow will not leave their side. The destinies...

The Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina

An Illustrated Catalogue

Author: Elizabeth A. Sudduth

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 526

The Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina was founded in 1997 by Matthew J. and Arlyn Bruccoli and named for Professor Bruccoli's father, who was wounded in France during the conflict. An expansive research archive for the literary, historical, and cultural aspects of World War I from both British and American vantages, the collection is housed in the Thomas Cooper Library at the University of South Carolina campus in Columbia. At present, the Bruccoli Great War Collection contains over four thousand items, including such print materials as military training manuals, illustrated wartime magazines, trench newspapers, British novels and poetry of the war, letters and diaries of participants, scrapbooks and photo albums, posters, slides, and sheet music. Comprehensive in range rather than exhaustive in depth, the collection was expanded in 2002 through the incorporation of some five hundred books and documents formerly part of the Joseph Cohen Collection of World War I Literature, additions that include extremely rare work by Isaac Rosenberg, arguably chief among the Great War poets. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina: An Illustrated Catalogue documents one of the great watersheds moments of history on both sides of the Atlantic and serves as a reference and resource for historians, researchers, and collectors alike.

The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation

African Americans and the Fight for Freedom

Author: Glenn David Brasher

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 166

In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war--the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln's decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher's unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential manpower and provided intelligence that shaped the campaign's military tactics and strategy and that their activities helped to convince many Northerners that emancipation was a military necessity. Drawing on the voices of Northern soldiers, civilians, politicians, and abolitionists as well as Southern soldiers, slaveholders, and the enslaved, Brasher focuses on the slaves themselves, whose actions showed that they understood from the outset that the war was about their freedom. As Brasher convincingly shows, the Peninsula Campaign was more important in affecting the decision for emancipation than the Battle of Antietam.