Conduct of the Persian Gulf Conflict

An Interim Report to Congress

Author:

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 250

View: 496

Includes responses to 26 questions asked by the Congress, including: military objectives, military strategy, deployment of troops, use of special operations forces, employment and performance of U.S. military equipment, logistics support, acquisitions policy, personnel management, role of women, effectiveness of reserves, intelligence and counterintelligence, environmental terrorism, rules of engagement, C3 operations, rules of engagement, media policies and procedures, use of deception, preparedness, number of military and civilian casualties, acquisition of foreign military technology from Iraq, and more. Glossary and map.

THE WORLD WAR COLLECTION OF H. C. MCNEILE (SAPPER)

No Man's Land, Mufti, Word of Honour, John Walters, Sergeant Michael Cassidy, The Human Touch, The Finger of Fate, The Lieutenant…

Author: H. C. McNeile / Sapper

Publisher: Musaicum Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1320

View: 877

This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Herman Cyril McNeile (1888-1937) commonly known as H. C. McNeile or Sapper, was a British soldier and author. Drawing on his experiences in the trenches during the First World War, he started writing short stories and getting them published in the Daily Mail. McNeile's stories are either directly about the war, or contain people whose lives have been shaped by it. His war stories were considered by contemporary audiences as anti-sentimental, realistic depictions of the trenches, and as a "celebration of the qualities of the Old Contemptibles". "No one who has ever given the matter a moment's thought would deny, I suppose, that a regiment without discipline is like a ship without a rudder. True as that fact has always been, it is doubly so now, when men are exposed to mental and physical shocks such as have never before been thought of. The condition of a man's brain after he has sat in a trench and suffered an intensive bombardment for two or three hours can only be described by one word, and that is—numbed. The man becomes half-stunned, dazed; his limbs twitch convulsively and involuntarily; he mutters foolishly—he becomes incoherent. Starting with fright he passes through that stage, passes beyond it into a condition bordering on coma; and when a man is in that condition he is not responsible for his actions. His brain has ceased to work...” - H. C. McNeile, Men, Women and Guns Table of Contents: When Carruthers Laughed Mufti John Walters Men, Women and Guns No Man's Land The Human Touch Word of Honour The Man in Ratcatcher The Lieutenant and Others Sergeant Michael Cassidy, R.E. Jim Brent

The Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina

An Illustrated Catalogue

Author: Elizabeth A. Sudduth

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 600

The Joseph M. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina was founded in 1997 by Matthew J. and Arlyn Bruccoli and named for Professor Bruccoli's father, who was wounded in France during the conflict. An expansive research archive for the literary, historical, and cultural aspects of World War I from both British and American vantages, the collection is housed in the Thomas Cooper Library at the University of South Carolina campus in Columbia. At present, the Bruccoli Great War Collection contains over four thousand items, including such print materials as military training manuals, illustrated wartime magazines, trench newspapers, British novels and poetry of the war, letters and diaries of participants, scrapbooks and photo albums, posters, slides, and sheet music. Comprehensive in range rather than exhaustive in depth, the collection was expanded in 2002 through the incorporation of some five hundred books and documents formerly part of the Joseph Cohen Collection of World War I Literature, additions that include extremely rare work by Isaac Rosenberg, arguably chief among the Great War poets. Bruccoli Great War Collection at the University of South Carolina: An Illustrated Catalogue documents one of the great watersheds moments of history on both sides of the Atlantic and serves as a reference and resource for historians, researchers, and collectors alike.

Goatskin Bags and Wisdom

New Critical Perspectives on African Literature

Author: Ernest Emenyo̲nu

Publisher: Africa World Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 393

View: 417

The Alex Benedict Collection: A Talent For War, Polaris, Seeker

Author: Jack McDevitt

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 900

View: 276

THE ALEX BENEDICT COLLECTION brings together sci-fi master Jack McDevitt's stellar first three novels in the award-winning Alex Benedict series. Perfect for fans of Ray Bradbury and Joe Haldeman. In A TALENT FOR WAR, Alex Benedict unearths a piece of information with the power to rewrite history and expose interstellar hero Christopher Sim as a fraud. On his quest for the truth Alex will venture into an unknown alien galaxy and face something stranger than he could ever have imagined. In POLARIS, Alex Benedict is determined to solve the mystery of the luxury space yacht that never returned from its interstellar journey sixty years ago. The search party found Polaris empty and adrift in space and now Alex must travel across the stars in a life-threatening mission to discover the truth. In the Nebula award-winning SEEKER, Alex Benedict is convinced that he has stumbled across an artefact from the infamous transport ship that fled a religious dictatorship in twenty-seventh-century America. Alex and his pilot Chase are taken into the very heart of danger on the deadly trail to Seeker.

A History of the Laws of War: Volume 1

The Customs and Laws of War with Regards to Combatants and Captives

Author: Alexander Gillespie

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 278

View: 104

This unique new work of reference traces the origins of the modern laws of warfare from the earliest times to the present day. Relying on written records from as far back as 2400 BCE, and using sources ranging from the Bible to Security Council Resolutions, the author pieces together the history of a subject which is almost as old as civilisation itself. The author shows that as long as humanity has been waging wars it has also been trying to find ways of legitimising different forms of combatants and regulating the treatment of captives. This first book on warfare deals with the broad question of whether the patterns of dealing with combatants and captives have changed over the last 5,000 years, and if so, how? In terms of context, the first part of the book is about combatants and those who can 'lawfully' take part in combat. In many regards, this part of the first volume is a series of 'less than ideal' pathways. This is because in an ideal world there would be no combatants because there would be no fighting. Yet as a species we do not live in such a place or even anywhere near it, either historically or in contemporary times. This being so, a second-best alternative has been to attempt to control the size of military forces and, therefore, the bloodshed. This is also not the case by which humanity has worked over the previous centuries. Rather, the clear assumption for thousands of years has been that authorities are allowed to build the size of their armed forces as large as they wish. The restraints that have been applied are in terms of the quality and methods by which combatants are taken. The considerations pertain to questions of biology such as age and sex, geographical considerations such as nationality, and the multiple nuances of informal or formal combatants. These questions have also overlapped with ones of compulsion and whether citizens within a country can be compelled to fight without their consent. Accordingly, for the previous 3,000 years, the question has not been whether there should be a limit on the number of soldiers, but rather who is or is not a lawful combatant. It has rarely been a question of numbers. It has been, and remains, one of type. The second part of this book is about people, typically combatants, captured in battle. It is about what happens to their status as prisoners, about the possibilities of torture, assistance if they are wounded and what happens to their remains should they be killed and their bodies fall into enemy hands. The theme that ties all of these considerations together is that all of the acts befall those who are, to one degree or another, captives of their enemies. As such, they are no longer masters of their own fate. As a work of reference this first volume, as part of a set of three, is unrivalled, and will be of immense benefit to scholars and practitioners researching and advising on the laws of warfare. It also tells a story which throws fascinating new light on the history of international law and on the history of warfare itself.

Artists in Times of War

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 39

View: 590

"Political power," says Howard Zinn, "is controlled by the corporate elite, and the arts are the locale for a kind of guerilla warfare in the sense that guerillas look for apertures and opportunities where they can have an effect." In Artists in Times of War, Zinn looks at the possibilities to create such apertures through art, film, activism, publishing and through our everyday lives. In this collection of four essays, the author of A People's History of the United States writes about why "To criticize the government is the highest act of patriotism." Filled with quotes and examples from the likes of Bob Dylan, Mark Twain, e. e. cummings, Thomas Paine, Joseph Heller, and Emma Goldman, Zinn's essays discuss America's rich cultural counternarratives to war, so needed in these days of unchallenged U.S. militarism.