Those Terrible Middle Ages

Debunking the Myths

Author: Régine Pernoud

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 179

View: 296

As she examines the many misconceptions about the "Middle Ages", the renown French historian, Regine Pernoud, gives the reader a refreshingly original perspective on many subjects, both historical (from the Inquisition and witchcraft trials to a comparison of Gothic and Renaissance creative inspiration) as well as eminently modern (from law and the place of women in society to the importance of history and tradition). Here are fascinating insights, based on Pernoud's sound knowledge and extensive experience as an archivist at the French National Archives. The book will be provocative for the general readers as well as a helpful resource for teachers. Scorned for centuries, although lauded by the Romantics, these thousand years of history have most often been concealed behind the dark clouds of ignorance: Why, didn't godiche (clumsy, oafish) come from gothique (Gothic)? Doesn't "fuedal" refer to the most hopeless obscurantism? Isn't "Medieval" applied to dust-covered, outmoded things? Here the old varnish is stripped away and a thousand years of history finally emerge -- the "Middle Ages" are dead, long live the Middle Ages!

The Templars

Knights of Christ

Author: Régine Pernoud

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 157

View: 904

For centuries, historians and novelists have portrayed the Knights Templar as avaricious and power-hungry villains. Indignant at the discrepancies between fact and fantasy, Pernoud draws a different portrait of these Christian warriors.

The Complete Idiot's Guide to World History, 2nd Edition

Author: Timothy C. Hall, M.A.

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 462

Puts world events in a context that is relevant for today's students and casual readers Updated to include the significant events from the past several years

Bridging the Medieval-Modern Divide

Medieval Themes in the World of the Reformation

Author: James Muldoon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 649

The debate about when the middle ages ended and the modern era began, has long been a staple of the historical literature. In order to further this debate, and illuminate the implications of a longue durée approach to the history of the Reformation, this collection offers a selection of essays that address the medieval-modern divide. Covering a broad range of topics - encompassing legal, social, cultural, theological and political history - the volume asks fundamental questions about how we regard history, and what historians can learn from colleagues working in other fields that may not at first glance appear to offer any obvious links. By focussing on the concept of the medieval-modern divide - in particular the relation between the Middle Ages and the Reformation - each essay examines how a medievalist deals with a specific topic or issue that is also attracting the attention of Reformation scholars. In so doing it underlines the fact that both medievalists and modernists are often involved in bridging the medieval-modern divide, but are inclined to construct parallel bridges that end between the two starting points but do not necessarily meet. As a result, the volume challenges assumptions about the strict periodization of history, and suggest that a more flexible approach will yield interesting historical insights.

Gendering Christian Ethics

Author: Jenny Daggers

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 199

View: 425

Gendering Christian Ethics brings together ethical reflections by a new generation of European and American researchers. Contributors are well versed in feminist theology and feminist theory; chapters build on foundations laid by pioneers who first raised questions of gender and Christianity. Christian ethics have a bearing on the conduct of Christian theology, church or institution, and on distinctive Christian ways of engaging with the wider world. Gendering Christian Ethics addresses these inner and outer dynamics.

Martin of Tours

Soldier, Bishop, and Saint

Author: Régine Pernoud

Publisher: Ignatius Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 199

View: 642

Regine Pernoud, the highly acclaimed French medieval historian, and author of best-selling titles on Joan of Arc and Hildegard of Bingen, as well as the book Those Terrible Middle Ages, presents an enlighteneing biography of one of France's most revered saints, and man whose impact on France, and Europe, continues to this days. Martin of Tours lived in the 4th century, at that great turning point in history when the Roman Empire fell and the Church took charge in the West. He left a successful career in the military life to become a monk, and later a Bishop who traveled extensively, evangelizing the countryside and creatiung that particular sort of community life in a village that is now called a "parish." More than four hundred towns and some four thousand parished in France are named after St. Martin. The term "chapel" is derived from the actual church where pilgrims venerate Martin's "cape" or cloak. Martin of Tours was a servant of the common man, as well as the nobility, and a very humble man who responded to the needs of his times and and opened up vast perspectives for ordinary, everyday life. Given the crisis of the Christian Faith now facing France and all of Europe, the story of this solider and great apostle and Christian evangelist is a timely one indeed.

How Can You Still Be Catholic?

50 Answers to a Good Question

Author: Christopher Sparks

Publisher: Marian Press - Association of Marian Helpers

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 901

Christopher Sparks asked Facebook friends to finish the question: “How can you still be Catholic when … ?” The replies came swiftly and forcefully. With that, Sparks went to work. Here is the result. In this book, he addresses the biggest issues people grapple with when they think about the Catholic Church: the Inquisition, the Crusades, the Church’s role in a state, homosexuality, the role of women in the Church, and many others.For skeptics and non-Catholics, this book is an invitation to understanding the faith, a way for outsiders to hear one contemporary Catholic’s worldview, and to see through Catholic eyes, even if they remain unconvinced. For Catholics, this book is an introduction to an array of answers and resources for delving more deeply into and defending the faith.

Women in the Days of Cathedrals

Author: Régine Pernoud

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 522

Regine Pernoud has addressed herself to the study of many questions about the status of women in the Middle Ages and presents her surprising answers in this captivating work. Here one learns that the most ancient treatise on education in France was written by a woman; and medicine was practiced regularly by women in the thirteenth century; that in the twelfth century the Order of Fontevraud gathered both monks and religious sisters under the authority of an abbess. This is a systematic study that provides a multitude of concrete examples. No aspect of feminine activity in the course of the medieval periods is neglected: administration of property, professions and commerce, the intellectual life, even politics; writers, educators, sovereigns, and those who enlivened the royal courts. Moreover, the author draws from the history of law and the history of events and social customs to sketch something never before attempted, an outline of the evolution of the power of women. This is a classic work without reference to which any inquiry into the questions addressed here must remain incomplete.

Why Be Catholic?

Ten Answers to a Very Important Question

Author: Patrick Madrid

Publisher: Image

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 372

The popular blogger and publisher of Envoy magazine offers 10 key reasons why he loves being Catholic (and you should too). Drawing heavily on poignant anecdotes from his own experience as a life-long Catholic born in 1960s, Madrid offers readers a way of looking at the Church--its members, teachings, customs, and history--from perspectives many may have never considered. Growing up Catholic during a time of great social and theological upheaval and transition, a time in which countless Catholics abandoned their religion in search of something else, Patrick Madrid learned a great deal about why people leave Catholicism and why others stay. This experience helped him gain many insights into what it is about the Catholic Church that some people reject, as well as those things that others treasure. Drawing upon Madrid's personal experiences, Why Be Catholic? offers a deeply personal, fact-based, rationale for why everyone should be Catholic or at least consider the Catholic Church in a new light.