This Astounding Close

The Road to Bennett Place

Author: Mark L. Bradley

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 918

The continuation of hostilities after Appomattox is chronicled in this fascinating portrait of an often overlooked face of the Civil War and the first full-length analysis of the campaign leading up to Johnston's surrender to Sherman at Bennett Place, North Carolina.

This Astounding Close

The Road to Bennett Place

Author: Mark L. Bradley

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 750

Even after Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, the Civil War continued to be fought, and surrenders negotiated, on different fronts. The most notable of these occurred at Bennett Place, near Durham, North Carolina, when Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered the Army of Tennessee to Union General William T. Sherman. In this first full-length examination of the end of the war in North Carolina, Mark Bradley traces the campaign leading up to Bennett Place. Alternating between Union and Confederate points of view and drawing on his readings of primary sources, including numerous eyewitness accounts and the final muster rolls of the Army of Tennessee, Bradley depicts the action as it was experienced by the troops and the civilians in their path. He offers new information about the morale of the Army of Tennessee during its final confrontation with Sherman's much larger Union army. And he advances a fresh interpretation of Sherman's and Johnston's roles in the final negotiations for the surrender.

Private Confederacies

The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers

Author: James J. Broomall

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 657

How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint and shaped white men to embrace self-reliant masculinity, Confederate soldiers lived and fought within military units where they experienced the traumatic strain of combat and its privations together--all the while being separated from suffering families. Military service provoked changes that escalated with the end of slavery and the Confederacy's military defeat. Returning to civilian life, Southern veterans questioned themselves as never before, sometimes suffering from terrible self-doubt. Drawing on personal letters and diaries, Broomall argues that the crisis of defeat ultimately necessitated new forms of expression between veterans and among men and women. On the one hand, war led men to express levels of emotionality and vulnerability previously assumed the domain of women. On the other hand, these men also embraced a virulent, martial masculinity that they wielded during Reconstruction and beyond to suppress freed peoples and restore white rule through paramilitary organizations and the Ku Klux Klan.

Freedom by the Sword

The U.S. Colored Troops, 1862-1867

Author: William A. Dobak

Publisher: Department of the Army

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 553

View: 877

From late 1862 to the spring of 1865, the federal government accepted more than 180,000 black men as soldiers, something it had never done before on such a scale. Known collectively as the United States Colored Troops and organized in segregated regiments led by white officers, some of these soldiers guarded army posts along major rivers; others fought Confederate raiders to protect Union supply trains; and still others took part in major operations like the siege of Petersburg and the battle of Nashville. After the war, many of the black regiments garrisoned the former Confederacy to enforce federal Reconstruction policy. This book tells the story of these soldiers' recruitment, organization, and service.

The Scourge of War

The Life of William Tecumseh Sherman

Author: Brian Holden Reid

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Generals

Page: 640

View: 616

Formative years, 1822-1861 -- Working his way, March 1861-March 1864 -- Command of the military division of the Mississippi -- Things will never be the same again: the reckoning.

An Honorable Defeat

The Last Days of the Confederate Government

Author: William C. Davis

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 103

A study of the finals days of the Confederacy at the end of the Civil War focuses on two men--Jefferson Davis, the autocratic president of the Confederate States, and his affable, practical Secretary of War, General John C. Breckinridge--who played key roles in the Confederate government. 50,000 first printing.

Astonishing Bathroom Reader

Your No.2 Source to All the Flushing Facts, Jamming Trivia, & Gassy Mysteries of the Universe!

Author: Diego Jourdan Pereira

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 600

View: 981

600 pages of fascinating facts about everything from science to history to pop culture Did you know the longest mountain range on earth is under water? How about the fact that June was named after Juno, the Roman goddess of marriage? If not, don’t worry! You can learn details about these facts and more useful (and useless) trivia in this gigantic collection. With subjects from across the spectrum, read all about the presidents, planets, ball games, and more in six overflowing chapters: Gassy Universe Loaded Science Jamming History Clogged Culture Bursting Sports Flushing Phenomena Whether you’re interested in cannibalism, classic movie quotes, or the Milky Way, there is a list, factoid, or timeline for everyone in this epic compendium. You’ll never be bored on the toilet (or in the car or in bed) ever again. Crack open the Astonishing Bathroom Reader and read all about everything you didn’t think you needed to know!