Recovering Theological Hermeneutics

An Incarnational -Trinitarian Theory of Interpretation

Author: Jens Zimmermann

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 812

Theological Hermeneutics

Development and Significance

Author: Werner G. Jeanrond

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 220

View: 564

An introduction to the history and scope of interpretation theory in theology. It discusses hermeneutical consciousness in Christian thinking from the time of the Church Fathers up to today.

Rendering the Word in Theological Hermeneutics

Mapping Divine and Human Agency

Author: Mark Alan Bowald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 214

View: 893

This book proposes an original typology for grasping the differences between diverse types of biblical interpretation, fashioned in a triangle around a major theological and philosophical lacuna: the relation between divine and human action. Despite their purported concern for reading God's word, most modern and postmodern approaches to biblical interpretation do not seriously consider the role of divine agency as having a real influence in and on the process of reading Scripture. Mark Bowald seeks to correct and clarify this deficiency by demonstrating the inevitable role that divine agency plays in contemporary proposals in relation to human agency enacted in the composition of the biblical text and the reader. This book presents an important contribution to the emerging field of theological hermeneutics. Bowald discusses in depth the hermeneutics of George Lindbeck, Hans Frei, Kevin Vanhoozer, Francis Watson, Stephen Fowl, David Kelsey, Werner Jeanrond, Karl Barth, James K.A. Smith, and Nicholas Wolterstorff.

SCM Core Text Theological Hermeneutics

Author: Alexander S. Jensen

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 819

This book introduces theological hermeneutics by giving a historical account of the development of hermeneutical thinking. It defines hermeneutics as the analysis of the obstacles to understanding. The history of hermeneutical thinking and responses to obstacles is told here, beginning with the allegorical interpretation of myths in Hellenism through to the contemporary view of the hermeneutical problem as universal. Following the opening chapters on the history of hermeneutical thought, the book presents an overview of the various contemporary hermeneutical schools of thought, and shows their rooted-ness in different parts of the hermeneutical tradition. The focus is clearly on biblical interpretation however it does also take account of developments outside the field of theology, as they influence the theological reflection on the hermeneutical problem. The questions raised and the possible answers suggested in this volume will be of interest to students of other disciplines, such as philosophy and literature.

Theological Hermeneutics in the Classical Pentecostal Tradition

A Typological Account

Author: L. William Oliverio

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 384

View: 204

In Theological Hermeneutics in the Classical Pentecostal Tradition, L. William Oliverio Jr. accounts for the development of Classical Pentecostal theological hermeneutics through four hermeneutical types and concludes with a philosophical basis for future Pentecostal theological hermeneutics within the contours of a hermeneutical realism.

The Theological Hermeneutics of Homiletical Application and Ecclesiastes 7:23-29

Author: Aubrey Dickson Spears

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 904

The aim of this study is to expose the theological-hermeneutical substructure of homiletical application, and thereby to produce a fresh approach to homiletical application. Broadly construed as the point of contact between the text and the congregation, homiletical application is the most significant problem facing contemporary homiletics. Chapter one introduces the problem and identifies the four contemporary homiletical approaches to application: Contemporary Traditional Homiletics (CTH), New Homiletics (NH), Post-Liberal Homiletics (PLH), and (radically) Post-Modern Homiletics (PMH). Chapter two is a case study of CTH, exposi ng its theological-hermeneutical presuppositions and their impact on the view of application espoused by CTH. In chapter three we classify the three ways in which contemporary homiletics conceive of application hermeneutically: as distinct from understanding, involved in understanding, and determinate of understanding. CTH espouses the former view, NH the middle view, and PMH the latter view. PLH taps into both the involved and the determinate approaches. Exploring the hermeneutical ecology of application (textuality, language, history, and epistemology) reveals strengths and weaknesses of each view and establishes the polymorphous nature of application; i.e., its objcct determines the nature of application. In chapter four we face the inevitable challenges of objectivism on the one hand and radical relativism on the other hand. Navigating these two extremes in terms of the role of application in the process of understanding brings the nature of application sharply into focus. Conceiving of understanding in Gadamer's terms of a fusion of horizons allows the homiletician to respect the heterogeneity of the whole range of language games, to affirm a robust understanding of the nature of truth, to discipline interpretation by the text at hand and yet to acknowledge the necessary and creative role of the interpreter in the process of understanding, and finally to recognize the transformative power of the text. In chapters five and six we approach Ecclesiastes 7:23-29 with the view of application developed in chapters one through four. Chapter five is an interpretation of Ecclesiastes 7:23-29 with attention given to the particular way in which the reader is structured into the meaning ofthe text, and thus to the specific nature of application in the process of understanding th.is particular text. Chapter six identifies three questions that empower a preacher to make the move from studying the passage to preaching the passage. These three quest ions reveal that a polymorphic approach to application not only exposes the weakness and exploits the strengths of CTH, NH, PLH. and PMH, but it also empowers one to go beyond the current approaches into a more robust homiletic that enables the preacher and congregation to engage the immediate presence of the text as the interconection of thought, feeling, imagination, and truth is recovered.

Canonical Hermeneutics

The Theological Basis and Implications of the Thought of Brevard S. Childs

Author: Charles J. Scalise

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bible

Page: 496

View: 288

This study offered an analysis of the theological context of Childs' canonical hermeneutics, demonstrating and defending the following thesis: The canonical approach of Brevard S. Childs is in large measure an extension of the theological hermeneutics of Karl Barth. For Childs the historical critical reconstruction of Scripture is subordinated to its theological meaning as discerned from the pattern of its canonical shape. Childs' hermeneutical strategy, like that of Barth, enables the recovery of continuity with precritical interpretation, while incorporating the results of modern historical study. Chapter 1 traced the development of Childs' proposal and described the nature of his canonical approach. Childs' interpretation of Deuteronomy and Exodus provided concrete illustrations. The debate concerning canon as a theological and hermeneutical construct was examined, with attention to the status of canon as theological claim and its relationships to community, postcritical interpretation, and structuralism. Chapter 2 argued that Barth's hermeneutics provide the appropriate theological context for understanding Childs' approach. Following a discussion of Barth's theological exegesis, the importance of canon for his biblical interpretation was examined, and the relationship between Childs and Barth was explored in detail. Three Barthian theological themes--(1) the Bible as the witness to revelation, (2) opposition to existentialist hermeneutics, and (3) the rejection of anthropocentric theology--were then utilized to illuminate the relationships between Childs and some of his major critics. Chapter 3 analyzed the significance of history of exegesis for Childs' approach. It was argued that the idea of patterns of exegesis describes a major way in which both Barth and Childs seek to re-establish postcritical continuity with precritical interpretation. The chapter concluded with discussion of historical, literary, and theological questions arising from Childs' emphasis upon the final form of the text. Chapter 4 clarified some larger theological implications of Childs' canonical hermeneutics through a cross-disciplinary dialogue with the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer and Paul Ricoeur. It was argued that theology provides a common meeting ground for a productive dialogue between biblical interpretation and philosophical hermeneutics. The conclusion offered a critical evaluation of Childs' approach and speculated upon future directions for canonical hermeneutics.

Refiguring Theological Hermeneutics

Hermes, Trickster, Fool

Author: M. Grau

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 201

View: 771

Grau reconsiders the relationship between "logos" and "mythos" as a precondition to opening theological hermeneutics to discourse from other cultures and genres, other modes of telling and retelling.

Theological Hermeneutics and 1 Thessalonians

Author: Angus Paddison

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 503

This book proposes a theological reading of 1 Thessalonians, making an important response to the increasing demand to relate biblical scholarship more closely to theological concerns. Paddison's interpretation adheres very closely to the text and is divided into three parts. Part I offers a theological critique of dominant historical-critical readings of 1 Thessalonians. Part II examines the history of interpretation of 1 Thessalonians focusing on the pre-Modern exegesis of Thomas Aquinas and John Calvin. Paddison explores what theological exegetes can learn from Thomas Aquinas' Lectura and John Calvin's commentary on 1 Thessalonians. Aided by the insights of these neglected pre-Modern commentators, Part III presents a theologically driven interpretation of the letter. Theological exegesis is practised as a dialogue with Paul, the canon and a plethora of theological voices to elucidate Paddison's central argument, that the astonishing subject-matter of 1 Thessalonians is God's all-powerful hold over death.

Theological Hermeneutics

Christian Feminist Biblical Interpretation and the Believers' Church Tradition

Author: Nadine Pence Frantz

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bible

Page: 514

View: 751

Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics

Author: Aaron B Hebbard

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 220

Employing such disciplines as historical criticism, literary criticism, narrative theology, and hermeneutics, Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics seeks to maintain an interdisciplinary approach to the Book of Daniel. Through this approach, the author sets out to understand and interpret the Book of Daniel as a narrative exercise in theological hermeneutics. Two inherently linked perspectives are utilised in this particular reading of the text: First is the perception that the character of Daniel is the paradigm of the good theological hermeneut; theology and hermeneutics are inseparable and converge in the character of Daniel. Second is the standpoint that the Book of Daniel on the whole should be read as a hermeneutics textbook. Readers are led through a series of theories and exercises meant to be instilled into their theological, intellectual, and practical lives. Attention to the reader of the text is a constant theme throughout this thesis. The author's concernis primarily with contemporary readers and their communities, and so greater emphasis is placed on what the Book of Daniel means for contemporary readers than on what it meant in its historical setting. However, sensible consideration is given to the historical readerly community with which contemporary readers find continuity. In the end, readers are left with difficult challenges, a sobering awareness of the volatility of the business of hermeneutics, and serious implications for readers to implement both theologically and hermeneutically.

Theological Hermeneutics and the Book of Numbers as Christian Scripture

Author: Richard S. Briggs

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 356

View: 196

How should Christian readers of scripture hold appropriate and constructive tensions between exegetical, critical, hermeneutical, and theological concerns? This book seeks to develop the current lively discussion of theological hermeneutics by taking an extended test case, the book of Numbers, and seeing what it means in practice to hold all these concerns together. In the process the book attempts to reconceive the genre of "commentary" by combining focused attention to the details of the text with particular engagement with theological and hermeneutical concerns arising in and through the interpretive work. The book focuses on the main narrative elements of Numbers 11–25, although other passages are included (Numbers 5, 6, 33). With its mix of genres and its challenging theological perspectives, Numbers offers a range of difficult cases for traditional Christian hermeneutics. Briggs argues that the Christian practice of reading scripture requires engagement with broad theological concerns, and brings into his discussion Frei, Auerbach, Barth, Ricoeur, Volf, and many other biblical scholars. The book highlights several key formational theological questions to which Numbers provides illuminating answers: What is the significance and nature of trust in God? How does holiness (mediated in Numbers through the priesthood) challenge and redefine our sense of what is right, or "fair"? To what extent is it helpful to conceptualize life with God as a journey through a wilderness, of whatever sort? Finally, short of whatever promised land we may be, what is the context and role of blessing?

Theology, Hermeneutics, and Imagination

The Crisis of Interpretation at the End of Modernity

Author: Garrett Green

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 229

View: 958

Explores the contemporary crisis of biblical interpretation by examining modern and postmodern 'hermeneutics of suspicion'.

Pentecostal Rationality

Epistemology and Theological Hermeneutics in the Foursquare Tradition

Author: Simo Frestadius

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 848

This book not only articulates a tradition-specific Pentecostal rationality of Biblical Pragmatism, but also provides the first intellectual history of a major British classical Pentecostal denomination. Pentecostal theologians increasingly acknowledge that their theological methodology should be informed by a Pentecostal rationality, epistemology and theological hermeneutics. Simo Frestadius offers such a Pentecostal rationality from a Foursquare perspective. Frestadius first analyses and evaluates some of the main contemporary Pentecostal rationalities and epistemologies to date, with a particular emphasis on the works of Amos Yong and James K.A. Smith and L. William Oliverio Jr., before proposing that Alasdair MacIntyre's tradition-focused and historically-minded narrative approach is conducive in providing a more tradition-constituted Pentecostal rationality. Utilising the methodological insights of MacIntyre, the book then provides a philosophically informed historical narrative of a major British Pentecostal tradition, namely, the Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance, by exploring its underlying context and roots as a classical Pentecostal movement, its emergence as a religious tradition, and its two major 'epistemological crises'. Based on this historical narration and analysis, it is argued that Elim's tacit Pentecostal rationality is best defined as Pentecostal Biblical Pragmatism in a Foursquare Gospel framework. This form of rationality is then developed vis-à-vis Elim's Pentecostal concept of truth, biblical hermeneutics, and pragmatic epistemic justification in dialogue with William P. Alston. In doing the above, the book not only articulates a tradition-specific Pentecostal rationality of Biblical Pragmatism but also provides the first intellectual history of a major British classical Pentecostal denomination.

Spirit-Word-Community

Theological Hermeneutics in Trinitarian Perspective

Author: Amos Yong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 950

This title was first published in 2002. How does one go about "doing Christian theology"? Yong explores this question by proposing a pneumatological-trinitarian hermeneutic. Its thesis is that interpretation and theological method is an ongoing tri-logue of Spirit-Word-Community: of interpretive subjects as imaginative, obligated and relational agents; of the horizons of the interpreter, the biblical and ecclesial traditions, and the world; and of founding, historical, and ongoing communities of faith and inquiry. Ecumenical perspectives on the topics of pneumatology (the doctrine of the Spirit), metaphysics (foundational pneumatology), epistemology (the pneumatological imagination), and trinitarian theology converge in this book to move forward the present discussion of theological method.

Revelation, Scripture and Church

Theological Hermeneutic Thought of James Barr, Paul Ricoeur and Hans Frei

Author: Richard R. Topping

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 560

How does God's involvement with the generation of Holy Scripture and its use in the life of the Christian church figure into the human work of Scripture interpretation? This is the central question that this book seeks to address. In critical conversation with the influential hermeneutic programs of James Barr, Paul Ricoeur and Hans Frei, Topping demonstrates how God's agency has been marginalized in the task of Scripture interpretation. Divine involvement with the Bible is bracketed out (Barr), rendered in generic terms (Ricoeur) or left implicit (Frei) in these depictions of the hermeneutic field. The result is that each of these hermeneutic programs is less than a ’realist’ interpretative proposal. Talk of God is eclipsed by the terminal consideration of human realities. Topping argues for the centrality of doctrinal description in a lively theological understanding of Scripture interpretation for the life of the church.

SCM Core Text: Theological Hermeneutics

Author: Alexander Jensen

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 974

This book introduces theological hermeneutics by giving a historical account of the development of hermeneutical thinking. It defines hermeneutics as the analysis of the obstacles to understanding. The history of hermeneutical thinking and responses to obstacles is told here, beginning with the allegorical interpretation of myths in Hellenism through to the contemporary view of the hermeneutical problem as universal. Following the opening chapters on the history of hermeneutical thought, the book presents an overview of the various contemporary hermeneutical schools of thought, and shows their rooted-ness in different parts of the hermeneutical tradition. The focus is clearly on biblical interpretation however it does also take account of developments outside the field of theology, as they influence the theological reflection on the hermeneutical problem. The questions raised and the possible answers suggested in this volume will be of interest to students of other disciplines, such as philosophy and literature.