Theatre and Social Media

Author: Patrick Lonergan

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 108

View: 339

Social media has become an increasingly prevalent aspect of our lives, used daily by many people. In this timely study, Patrick Lonergan examines the relationship between social media and theatre. He argues that social media is itself a performance space, analysing how it's used by both theatres and audiences and also in connection with each other.

The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Irish Theatre and Performance

Author: Eamonn Jordan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 866

View: 587

This Handbook offers a multiform sweep of theoretical, historical, practical and personal glimpses into a landscape roughly characterised as contemporary Irish theatre and performance. Bringing together a spectrum of voices and sensibilities in each of its four sections — Histories, Close-ups, Interfaces, and Reflections — it casts its gaze back across the past sixty years or so to recall, analyse, and assess the recent legacy of theatre and performance on this island. While offering information, overviews and reflections of current thought across its chapters, this book will serve most handily as food for thought and a springboard for curiosity. Offering something different in its mix of themes and perspectives, so that previously unexamined surfaces might come to light individually and in conjunction with other essays, it is a wide-ranging and indispensable resource in Irish theatre studies.

Theatre, Social Media, and Meaning Making

Author: Bree Hadley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 969

This book offers the first broad-based survey of the way artists, audiences and society at large are making use of social media, and how the emergence of social media platforms that allow two-way interaction between these groups has been held up as a ‘game changer’ by many in the theatre industry. The first book to analyse aesthetic, critical, audience development, marketing and assessment uptake of social media in the theatre industry in an integrated fashion, Theatre, Social Media and Meaning Making examines examples from the USA, UK, Europe and Australasia to provide a snapshot of this emerging niche within networked, telematic, immersive and participatory theatre production and reception practices. A vital new resource for the field, this book will appeal to scholars, students, and industry practitioners alike.

Theatre and the Digital

Author: Bill Blake

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 100

View: 407

Why should the digital bring about ideas of progress in the theatre arts? This question opens up a rich seam of provocative and original thinking about the uses of new media in theatre, about new forms of cultural practice and artistic innovation, and about the widening purposes of the theatre's cultural project in a changing digital world. Through detailed case-studies on the work of key international theatre companies such as the Elevator Repair Service and The Mission Business, Bill Blake explores how the digital is providing new scope for how we think about the theatre, as well as how the theatre in turn is challenging how we might relate to the digital.

Theatre and Entertainment

Author: Jim Davis

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 96

View: 845

What do we mean by entertainment? How does this concept relate to theatre? Should theatre be for pleasure or instruction? Can it not be both? In this stimulating book, Jim Davis examines this relationship, by assessing audience reception, political theatre and melodrama, and ultimately questions the limits of entertainment in theatre.

Irish Drama and Theatre Since 1950

Author: Patrick Lonergan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 725

Drawing on major new archival discoveries and recent research, Patrick Lonergan presents an innovative account of Irish drama and theatre, spanning the past seventy years. Rather than offering a linear narrative, the volume traces key themes to illustrate the relationship between theatre and changes in society. In considering internationalization, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, the Celtic Tiger period, feminism, and the changing status of the Catholic Church in Ireland, Lonergan asserts the power of theatre to act as an agent of change and uncovers the contribution of individual artists, plays and productions in challenging societal norms. Irish Drama and Theatre since 1950 provides a wide-ranging account of major developments, combined with case studies of the premiere or revival of major plays, the establishment of new companies and the influence of international work and artists, including Tennessee Williams, Chekhov and Brecht. While bringing to the fore some of the untold stories and overlooked playwrights following the declaration of the Irish Republic, Lonergan weaves into his account the many Irish theatre-makers who have achieved international prominence in the period: Samuel Beckett, Siobhán McKenna and Brendan Behan in the 1950s, continuing with Brian Friel and Tom Murphy, and concluding with the playwrights who emerged in the late 1990s, including Martin McDonagh, Enda Walsh, Conor McPherson, Marie Jones and Marina Carr. The contribution of major Irish companies to world theatre is also examined, including both the Abbey and Gate theatres, as well as Druid, Field Day and Charabanc. Through its engaging analysis of seventy years of Irish theatre, this volume charts the acts of gradual but revolutionary change that are the story of Irish theatre and drama and of its social and cultural contexts.

Intermediality in Theatre and Performance

Author: Freda Chapple

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 687

Intermediality : The incorporation of digital technology into theatre practice, and the presence of film, television and digital media in contemporary theatre is a significant feature of twentieth-century performance. Presented here for the first time is a major collection od essays written by The Theatre and Intermediality research Group of the International Federation for Theatre research. This books draws on the history of ideas to present a concept of intermediality as an integration of thoughts and medial processes and it locates intermediality at the inter-sections situated between the performers, the observers and the confluence of media, medial spaces and art forms involved in performance at a particular monent in time.

Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience

Author:

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 329

This ground breaking collection of essays is the first to examine the phenomenon of how, in the twenty-first century, Shakespeare has been experienced as a 'live' or 'as-live' theatre broadcast by audiences around the world. Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience explores the precursors of this phenomenon and its role in Shakespeare's continuing globalization. It considers some of the most important companies that have produced such broadcasts since 2009, including NT Live, Globe on Screen, RSC Live from Stratford-upon-Avon, Stratford Festival HD, Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company Live, and Cheek by Jowl, and examines the impact these broadcasts have had on branding, ideology, style and access to Shakespeare for international audiences. Contributors from around the world reflect on how broadcasts impact on actors' performances, changing viewing practices, local and international Shakespearean fan cultures and the use of social media by audience members for whom "liveness†? is increasingly tied up in the experience economy. The book tackles vexing questions regarding the 'presentness' and 'liveness' of performance in the 21st century, the reception of Shakespeare in a globally-connected environment, the challenges of sustaining an audience for stage Shakespeare, and the ideological implications of consuming theatre on screen. It will be crucial reading for scholars of the 'live' theatre broadcast, and enormously helpful for scholars of Shakespeare on screen and in performance more broadly.

In Defence of Theatre

Aesthetic Practices and Social Interventions

Author: Kathleen Gallagher

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 328

View: 836

Why theatre now? Reflecting on the mix of challenges and opportunities that face theatre in communities that are necessarily becoming global in scope and technologically driven, In Defence of Theatre offers a range of passionate reflections on this important question. Kathleen Gallagher and Barry Freeman bring together nineteen playwrights, actors, directors, scholars, and educators who discuss the role that theatre can – and must – play in professional, community, and educational venues. Stepping back from their daily work, they offer scholarly research, artists’ reflections, interviews, and creative texts that argue for theatre as a response to the political and cultural challenges emerging in the twenty-first century. Contributors address theatre’s contribution to local and global politics of place, its power as an antidote to various modern social ailments, and its pursuit of equality. Of equal concern are the systematic and practical challenges that confront those involved in realizing theatre’s full potential.

African Theatre

Media & performance

Author: David Kerr

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 154

View: 187

Examines the impact of new media (such as video and YouTube) and the use of multi-media on live and recorded performance in Africa.