The Wounded Storyteller

Body, Illness, and Ethics, Second Edition

Author: Arthur W. Frank

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 260

View: 632

Since it was first published in 1995, The Wounded Storyteller has occupied a unique place in the body of work on illness. Both the collective portrait of a so-called “remission society” of those who suffer from some type of illness or disability and a cogent analysis of their stories within a larger framework of narrative theory, Arthur W. Frank’s book has reached a large and diverse readership including the ill, medical professionals, and scholars of literary theory. Drawing on the work of authors such as Oliver Sacks, Anatole Broyard, Norman Cousins, and Audre Lorde, as well as from people he met during the years he spent among different illness groups, Frank recounts a stirring collection of illness stories, ranging from the well-known—Gilda Radner's battle with ovarian cancer—to the private testimonials of people with cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, and disabilities. Their stories are more than accounts of personal suffering: they abound with moral choices and point to a social ethic. In this new edition Frank adds a preface describing the personal and cultural times when the first edition was written. His new afterword extends the book’s argument significantly, writing about storytelling and experience, other modes of illness narration, and a version of hope that is both realistic and aspirational. Reflecting on both his own life during the creation of the first edition and the conclusions of the book itself, Frank reminds us of the power of storytelling as way to understanding our own suffering.

The Wounded Storyteller

Body, Illness, and Ethics

Author: Arthur W. Frank

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 231

View: 935

In At the Will of the Body, Arthur Frank told the story of his own illnesses, heart attack and cancer. That book ended by describing the existence of a "remission society," whose members all live with some form of illness or disability. The Wounded Storyteller is their collective portrait. Ill people are more than victims of disease or patients of medicine; they are wounded storytellers. People tell stories to make sense of their suffering; when they turn their diseases into stories, they find healing. Drawing on the work of authors such as Oliver Sacks, Anatole Broyard, Norman Cousins, and Audre Lorde, as well as from people he met during the years he spent among different illness groups, Frank recounts a stirring collection of illness stories, ranging from the well-known—Gilda Radner's battle with ovarian cancer—to the private testimonials of people with cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, and disabilties. Their stories are more than accounts of personal suffering: they abound with moral choices and point to a social ethic. Frank identifies three basic narratives of illness in restitution, chaos, and quest. Restitution narratives anticipate getting well again and give prominence to the technology of cure. In chaos narratives, illness seems to stretch on forever, with no respite or redeeming insights. Quest narratives are about finding that insight as illness is transformed into a means for the ill person to become someone new.

J.M. Coetzee and the Ethics of Power

Unsettling Complicity, Complacency, and Confession

Author: Emanuela Tegla

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 279

In J. M. Coetzee and the Ethics of Power, Emanuela Tegla offers an exploration of the interconnectedness between morality and individual conscience in Coetzee’s fiction, as well as a narratological analysis of important stylistic aspects, such as tense, narrative silence or the moral implications of the novels’ endings.

Growing Old in Christ

Author: Stanley Hauerwas

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 310

View: 593

One of the hallmarks of contemporary culture is its attitude toward aging and the elderly. Youth and productivity are celebrated in today's society, while the elderly are increasingly marginalized. This not only poses difficulties for old people but is also a loss for the young and middle-agers, who could learn much from the elderly, including what it means to grow old (and die) "in Christ." Growing Old in Christ presents the first serious theological reflection ever on what it means to grow old, particularly in our culture and particularly as a Christian. In a full-orbed discussion of the subject, eighteen first-rate Christian thinkers survey biblical and historical perspectives on aging, look at aging in the modern world, and describe the "Christian practice of growing old." Along the way they address many timely issues, including the medicalization of aging, the debate over physician-assisted suicide, and the importance of friendships both among the elderly and between the elderly and the young. Weighty enough to instruct theologians, ethicists, and professional caregivers yet accessible enough for pastors and general readers, this book will benefit anyone seeking faith-based insight into growing old. Contributors: David Aers David Cloutier Rowan A. Greer Stanley Hauerwas Judith C. Hays Richard B. Hays Shaun C. Henson L. Gregory Jones Susan Pendleton Jones Patricia Beattie Jung D. Stephen Long M. Therese Lysaught David Matzko McCarthy Keith G. Meador Charles Pinches Joel James Shuman Carole Bailey Stoneking Laura Yordy

Philosophies and Theories for Advanced Nursing Practice

Author: Janie B. Butts

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 700

View: 857

Philosophies and Theories for Advanced Nursing Practice, Third Edition is an essential resource for advanced practice nursing students in mastr’s and doctoral programs. Important Notice: The digital edition of this book is missing some of the images or content found in the physical edition.

Letting Stories Breathe

A Socio-Narratology

Author: Arthur W. Frank

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 489

Stories accompany us through life from birth to death. But they do not merely entertain, inform, or distress us—they show us what counts as right or wrong and teach us who we are and who we can imagine being. Stories connect people, but they can also disconnect, creating boundaries between people and justifying violence. In Letting Stories Breathe, Arthur W. Frank grapples with this fundamental aspect of our lives, offering both a theory of how stories shape us and a useful method for analyzing them. Along the way he also tells stories: from folktales to research interviews to remembrances. Frank’s unique approach uses literary concepts to ask social scientific questions: how do stories make life good and when do they endanger it? Going beyond theory, he presents a thorough introduction to dialogical narrative analysis, analyzing modes of interpretation, providing specific questions to start analysis, and describing different forms analysis can take. Building on his renowned work exploring the relationship between narrative and illness, Letting Stories Breathe expands Frank’s horizons further, offering a compelling perspective on how stories affect human lives.

Perceiving Pain in African Literature

Author: Z. Norridge

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 799

An analysis of literary accounts of suffering from sub-Saharan Africa, this book examines fiction and life-writing in English and French over the last forty years. Drawing on writers from the canonical to the less well-known, it uses close readings to examine the personal, social and political consequences of representing pain in literature.

Psychosis in the Family

The Journey of a Transpersonal Psychotherapist and Mother

Author: Janet C. Love

Publisher: Karnac Books

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 208

View: 237

This is a book written not just by a professional transpersonal psychotherapist but by someone who has walked the heart-rending path and experienced the psychological trauma of loving someone in psychosis; psychosis which still remains the greatest taboo in society today, together with its implicit diagnosis of a lifelong sentence of medication and no cure. It is in the main a personal and moving narrative of a mother looking to help her son avoid such a lifelong sentence of medication whilst trying to research holistic resources and alternative approaches for treatment at the same time as negotiating the vagaries of the current mental health system. It is often a tale of despair and frustration, yet also gives a compassionate voice. Transpersonal and transgenerational psychotherapeutic insights back up the personal narrative. It includes an accessible inquiry into how unconscious forces influence our mind, our bodies and the entire family system. Its hypothesis is that if we cannot understand our own unconscious responses how can we understand those of our loved ones in psychotic episodes? This is a highly readable, provocative weave of story and theory, one of the great untold stories of our time.

The Artificial Ear

Cochlear Implants and the Culture of Deafness

Author: Stuart Blume

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 920

When it was first developed, the cochlear implant was hailed as a "miracle cure" for deafness. That relatively few deaf adults seemed to want it was puzzling. The technology was then modified for use with deaf children, 90 percent of whom have hearing parents. Then, controversy struck as the Deaf community overwhelmingly protested the use of the device and procedure. For them, the cochlear implant was not viewed in the context of medical progress and advances in the physiology of hearing, but instead represented the historic oppression of deaf people and of sign languages. Part ethnography and part historical study, The Artificial Ear is based on interviews with researchers who were pivotal in the early development and implementation of the new technology. Through an analysis of the scientific and clinical literature, Stuart Blume reconstructs the history of artificial hearing from its conceptual origins in the 1930s, to the first attempt at cochlear implantation in Paris in the 1950s, and to the widespread clinical application of the "bionic ear" since the 1980s.

The Return of the Storyteller in Contemporary Fiction

Author: Areti Dragas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 399

Focusing on the figure of the storyteller, this study breaks new ground in the approach to reading contemporary literature by identifying a growing interest in storytelling. For the last thirty years contemporary fiction has been influenced by theoretical discourses, textuality and writing. Only since the rise of postcolonialism have academic critics been more overtly interested in stories, where high theory frameworks are less applicable. However, as we move through various contemporary contexts engaging with postcolonial identities and hybridity, to narratives of disability and evolutionary accounts of group and individual survival, a common feature of all is the centrality of story, which posits both the idea of survival and the passing on of traditions. This book closely examines this preoccupation with story and storytelling through a close reading of sixteen contemporary international novels written in English which are about actual 'storytellers', revealing how death of the author has given birth to the storyteller.