The Wounded Storyteller

Body, Illness, and Ethics, Second Edition

Author: Arthur W. Frank

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 260

View: 798

Since it was first published in 1995, The Wounded Storyteller has occupied a unique place in the body of work on illness. Both the collective portrait of a so-called “remission society” of those who suffer from some type of illness or disability and a cogent analysis of their stories within a larger framework of narrative theory, Arthur W. Frank’s book has reached a large and diverse readership including the ill, medical professionals, and scholars of literary theory. Drawing on the work of authors such as Oliver Sacks, Anatole Broyard, Norman Cousins, and Audre Lorde, as well as from people he met during the years he spent among different illness groups, Frank recounts a stirring collection of illness stories, ranging from the well-known—Gilda Radner's battle with ovarian cancer—to the private testimonials of people with cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, and disabilities. Their stories are more than accounts of personal suffering: they abound with moral choices and point to a social ethic. In this new edition Frank adds a preface describing the personal and cultural times when the first edition was written. His new afterword extends the book’s argument significantly, writing about storytelling and experience, other modes of illness narration, and a version of hope that is both realistic and aspirational. Reflecting on both his own life during the creation of the first edition and the conclusions of the book itself, Frank reminds us of the power of storytelling as way to understanding our own suffering.

Letting Stories Breathe

A Socio-Narratology

Author: Arthur W. Frank

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 756

Stories accompany us through life from birth to death. But they do not merely entertain, inform, or distress us—they show us what counts as right or wrong and teach us who we are and who we can imagine being. Stories connect people, but they can also disconnect, creating boundaries between people and justifying violence. In Letting Stories Breathe, Arthur W. Frank grapples with this fundamental aspect of our lives, offering both a theory of how stories shape us and a useful method for analyzing them. Along the way he also tells stories: from folktales to research interviews to remembrances. Frank’s unique approach uses literary concepts to ask social scientific questions: how do stories make life good and when do they endanger it? Going beyond theory, he presents a thorough introduction to dialogical narrative analysis, analyzing modes of interpretation, providing specific questions to start analysis, and describing different forms analysis can take. Building on his renowned work exploring the relationship between narrative and illness, Letting Stories Breathe expands Frank’s horizons further, offering a compelling perspective on how stories affect human lives.

The Return of the Storyteller in Contemporary Fiction

Author: Areti Dragas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 858

Focusing on the figure of the storyteller, this study breaks new ground in the approach to reading contemporary literature by identifying a growing interest in storytelling. For the last thirty years contemporary fiction has been influenced by theoretical discourses, textuality and writing. Only since the rise of postcolonialism have academic critics been more overtly interested in stories, where high theory frameworks are less applicable. However, as we move through various contemporary contexts engaging with postcolonial identities and hybridity, to narratives of disability and evolutionary accounts of group and individual survival, a common feature of all is the centrality of story, which posits both the idea of survival and the passing on of traditions. This book closely examines this preoccupation with story and storytelling through a close reading of sixteen contemporary international novels written in English which are about actual 'storytellers', revealing how death of the author has given birth to the storyteller.

J.M. Coetzee and the Ethics of Power

Unsettling Complicity, Complacency, and Confession

Author: Emanuela Tegla

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 865

In J. M. Coetzee and the Ethics of Power, Emanuela Tegla offers an exploration of the interconnectedness between morality and individual conscience in Coetzee’s fiction, as well as a narratological analysis of important stylistic aspects, such as tense, narrative silence or the moral implications of the novels’ endings.

Growing Old in Christ

Author: Stanley Hauerwas

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 310

View: 854

One of the hallmarks of contemporary culture is its attitude toward aging and the elderly. Youth and productivity are celebrated in today's society, while the elderly are increasingly marginalized. This not only poses difficulties for old people but is also a loss for the young and middle-agers, who could learn much from the elderly, including what it means to grow old (and die) "in Christ." Growing Old in Christ presents the first serious theological reflection ever on what it means to grow old, particularly in our culture and particularly as a Christian. In a full-orbed discussion of the subject, eighteen first-rate Christian thinkers survey biblical and historical perspectives on aging, look at aging in the modern world, and describe the "Christian practice of growing old." Along the way they address many timely issues, including the medicalization of aging, the debate over physician-assisted suicide, and the importance of friendships both among the elderly and between the elderly and the young. Weighty enough to instruct theologians, ethicists, and professional caregivers yet accessible enough for pastors and general readers, this book will benefit anyone seeking faith-based insight into growing old. Contributors: David Aers David Cloutier Rowan A. Greer Stanley Hauerwas Judith C. Hays Richard B. Hays Shaun C. Henson L. Gregory Jones Susan Pendleton Jones Patricia Beattie Jung D. Stephen Long M. Therese Lysaught David Matzko McCarthy Keith G. Meador Charles Pinches Joel James Shuman Carole Bailey Stoneking Laura Yordy

Perceiving Pain in African Literature

Author: Z. Norridge

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 710

An analysis of literary accounts of suffering from sub-Saharan Africa, this book examines fiction and life-writing in English and French over the last forty years. Drawing on writers from the canonical to the less well-known, it uses close readings to examine the personal, social and political consequences of representing pain in literature.

The Artificial Ear

Cochlear Implants and the Culture of Deafness

Author: Stuart Blume

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 813

When it was first developed, the cochlear implant was hailed as a "miracle cure" for deafness. That relatively few deaf adults seemed to want it was puzzling. The technology was then modified for use with deaf children, 90 percent of whom have hearing parents. Then, controversy struck as the Deaf community overwhelmingly protested the use of the device and procedure. For them, the cochlear implant was not viewed in the context of medical progress and advances in the physiology of hearing, but instead represented the historic oppression of deaf people and of sign languages. Part ethnography and part historical study, The Artificial Ear is based on interviews with researchers who were pivotal in the early development and implementation of the new technology. Through an analysis of the scientific and clinical literature, Stuart Blume reconstructs the history of artificial hearing from its conceptual origins in the 1930s, to the first attempt at cochlear implantation in Paris in the 1950s, and to the widespread clinical application of the "bionic ear" since the 1980s.

The Wounded Leader

How Real Leadership Emerges in Times of Crisis

Author: Richard H. Ackerman

Publisher: Jossey-Bass

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 273

As any school principal or adminstrator can tell you, the responsibilities of school leadership can take a person from inspired moments to crisis in an instant. How does a school leader with good intentions preserve a healthy sense of self in the face of a crisis which in the best of times challenges the self, and in the worst of times can lead to deep wounds of the heart? How can good leaders minimize the impact of these crises and remain open to learn and grow from these difficult experiences? These are the questions at the heart of the stories contained in The Wounded Leader. Through compelling stories that illustrate many of the common dilemmas faced by school leaders, the authors highlight the many paths to healing, and show how sometimes the most painful experience can be an opportunity for growth. "All leaders incur wounds. The Wounded Leader enables us to understand our wounds, learn from them....and begin to heal." - Roland Barth, Founder of Harvard Principals' Center "Not only is the book full of fresh ideas and new insights but it is a fun read. It is not the usual leadership book that reads much like the other leadership books but stands out as an original contribution...easily presented and scholarly without being pretentious." - Thomas J. Sergiovanni, Center for Educational Leadership at Trinity College, San Antonio, Texas

Aging and the Meaning of Time

A Multidisciplinary Exploration

Author: Susan McFadden, PhD

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 822

As we confront our own mortality, we might ask, "What has my long life meant and how have the years shaped me?" or "How long must I suffer?" Such questions reflect time-consciousness, the focus of this classic volume. The authors, from diverse disciplines in gerontology, act as guides in the exploration of the realms of time in later life and their meanings. As they examine how the study of time can give new meanings to aging, they also consider the religious and spiritual questions raised when human beings consider the temporal boundaries of life. This volume honors Melvin Kimble's contributions to gerontology and represents a new direction in the study of religion, spirituality, and aging.

Stories and Their Limits

Narrative Approaches to Bioethics

Author: Hilde Lindemann Nelson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 466

First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.