The Wolf Border

Author: Sarah Hall

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 324

View: 767

For almost a decade Rachel Caine has turned her back on home, kept distant by family disputes and her work monitoring wolves on an Idaho reservation. But now, summoned by the eccentric Earl of Annerdale and his controversial scheme to reintroduce the Grey Wolf to the English countryside, she is back in the peat and wet light of the Lake District. The earl's project harks back to an ancient idyll of untamed British wilderness - though Rachel must contend with modern-day concessions to health and safety, public outrage and political gain - and the return of the Grey after hundreds of years coincides with her own regeneration: impending motherhood, and reconciliation with her estranged family. The Wolf Border investigates the fundamental nature of wilderness and wildness, both animal and human. It seeks to understand the most obsessive aspects of humanity: sex, love, and conflict; the desire to find answers to the question of our existence; those complex systems that govern the most superior creature on earth.

Wolf Almanac, New and Revised

A Celebration Of Wolves And Their World

Author: Robert Busch

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 288

View: 114

The Wolf Almanac has become an acknowledged reference work on the evolution and history of wolves: their biology and physiology, behavior and sociology; and their influence in ancient culture and mythology. This newly revised edition contains the most recent information on the wolves of Yellowstone, as well as fully updated information on the status of wolves throughout the world.

Contemporary British Novel Since 2000

Author: James Acheson

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 795

Focuses on the novels published since 2000 by twenty major British novelistsThe Contemporary British Novel Since 2000 is divided into five parts, with the first part examining the work of four particularly well-known and highly regarded twenty-first century writers: Ian McEwan, David Mitchell, Hilary Mantel and Zadie Smith. It is with reference to each of these novelists in turn that the terms arealist, apostmodernist, ahistorical and apostcolonialist fiction are introduced, while in the remaining four parts, other novelists are discussed and the meaning of the terms amplified. From the start it is emphasised that these terms and others often mean different things to different novelists, and that the complexity of their novels often obliges us to discuss their work with reference to more than one of the terms.Also discusses the works of: Maggie OFarrell, Sarah Hall, A.L. Kennedy, Alan Warner, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Kate Atkinson, Salman Rushdie, Adam Foulds, Sarah Waters, James Robertson, Mohsin Hamid, Andrea Levy, and Aminatta Forna.

The Wolf in the Southwest

the making of an endangered species

Author: David Earl Brown

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 195

View: 955

Drawing on reports of the U.S. government's former Office of Predatory Animal and Rodent Control (PARC), and from accounts of wolf hunters themselves, David E. Brown has compiled the history of the wolf's elimination. Included is a complete documentation of the eradication program, fascinating stories of the last few wolves that eluded hunters, and information on wolf biology from those who best knew their habits. Since its first publication in 1982, The Wolf in the Southwest has proven itself as the single most valuable and informative reference to Canis lupus of the Mexican borderlands. Now, the descendants of the last wolves captured in Mexico once again roam portions of wilderness in New Mexico and Arizona. This edition contains a new preface by David E. Brown, and a new introduction by author and biologist Harley Shaw. Once again there are wolves in the woods; love him or hate him, the wolf is again relevant, and The Wolf in the Southwest is back in print.

The Master Book of Mathematical Recreations

Author: Frederik Schuh

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Games

Page: 430

View: 831

Guides the reader in understanding the mathematical principles involved in a wide variety of puzzles and card tricks.

The Return of the Wolf

Reflections on the Future of Wolves in the Northeast

Author: Bill McKibben

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 175

View: 756

Leading naturalists and writers respond to the possible return of the wolf to the Northeast.

The Hunger of the Wolf

A Novel

Author: Stephen Marche

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 856

A “spellbinding” (Publishers Weekly) literary novel with fangs: a sweeping, genre-busting tale of money, morality, and the American Dream—and the men and monsters who profit in its pursuit—set in New York, London, and the Canadian wilderness. Hunters found his body naked in the snow. The body is that of Ben Wylie, the second-richest man in America, and it is found in a remote patch of northern Canada. Far away, in New York, the son of the Wylie family’s housekeepers tries to figure out how and why Ben died. The answer lies in the tortured history of the Wylie family, who built up their massive fortune over three generations. All of the Wylie men struggle with a secret: they are werewolves. The threads of their destinies, both financial and supernatural, lead twistingly but inevitably to the naked body in the snow and a final, terrible revelation. The Hunger of the Wolf is a novel about what it means to be a man in a world of money. It’s about the pursuit of wealth through the rising tide of America in the twentieth century, seen through the sober lens of more recent economic times. It’s a novel about the innate nature of violence: The Wylie men struggle to control their inner rage, through physical restraint, psychotherapy, drugs, hedonistic abandon, and good old-fashioned denial. It’s a story of fathers and sons, about secrets that are kept in families, and about the cost of the tension between the public face and the private soul—the cruelty and loneliness and occasional joy of being a magical being in a quotidian world. A brilliant mystery from page one, “The Hunger of the Wolf is simply one of the most observant and entertaining examinations of modern will-to-wealth that fiction has produced in recent years” (Miami Herald).

The Belly of the Wolf

Author: R. A. MacAvoy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 756

Half-student, half-servant in the military Royal School of Sordaling, where he appears short and ugly to his tall Velonyan companions, Nazhuret is forced out at age 20. He is taken on by Powl - a mysterious individual learned in arts such as astronomy, war and languages - who teaches Nazhuret, above all, to control his body and mind. After several years, Nazhuret begins to find his own way, traveling around Velonya as an itinerant optician and befriending a wolf. Going south, he works as a bouncer in a tavern, where he discovers his mixed heritage: he is part Rezhmian, of a neighboring country often at war with Velonya. When he discovers a plot to kill King Raduf, Nazhuret's training, both of body and mind, is sorely tested. MacAvoy's complex realm is full of confusion and ambiguity, in which, as Powl says, "You, Nazhuret . . . are the lens of the world: the lens through which the world may become aware of itself. The world, on the the other hand, is the only lens in which you can see yourself."