The Wizards of Armageddon

Author: Fred Kaplan

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 546

This is the untold story of the small group of men who have devised the plans and shaped the policies on how to use the Bomb. The book (first published in 1983) explores the secret world of these strategists of the nuclear age and brings to light a chapter in American political and military history never before revealed.

Avoiding Armageddon

Canadian Military Strategy and Nuclear Weapons, 1950-1963

Author: Andrew Richter

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 670

Drawing on previously classified government records, Richter reveals that Canadian defence officials independently came to strategic understandings of the most critical issues of the nuclear age regarding the use of force in resolving disputes. Canadian appreciation of deterrence, arms control, and strategic stability differed conceptually from the US models. Similarly, Canadian thinking on the controversial issues of air defence and the domestic acquisition of nuclear weapons was primarily influenced by decidedly Canadian interests. This book illustrates Canada's considerable latitude for independent defence thinking while providing key historical information that helps make sense of the contemporary Canadian defence debate.

American Arsenal

A Century of Weapon Technology and Strategy

Author: Patrick Coffey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 812

American Arsenal examines the United States' transformation from isolationist state to military superpower by means of sixteen vignettes, each focusing upon an inventor and his contribution to the cause.

Stalking the Antichrists (1965–2012)

Author: George E. Lowe

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 723

View: 527

Volume 1 of Stalking the Antichrists and Their False Nuclear Prophets, Nuclear Gladiators, and Spirit Warriors,1940-1965 is essentially an enhanced memoir. It is based for the most part on my personal observations and knowledge and specialized information from my academic studies of history, political science, and literature at Grove City College and the University of Chicago,as well as my professional insights into the heart of the U. S. Navy (1953-1957, 1960-1961[OP- 09D]) as an Air Intelligence Officer in Hawaii and Japan and the Pentagon; political- military/counsellor assignments in the State Department as a Foreign Service Officer(FSO-6) at the American embassy in Paris (1962-64); and a speechwriter in the Navy Department (1965). In volume 2, the textual narrative begins with the end of my specific actions/ activities in the Navy and Foreign Service in July 1965, which I have called How I Lived in History, 1950-1965. In retrospect my entire Navy careerfrom my commissioning as Ensign USNR, 1355 AIO, in early September 1953 at Naval Station, Newport, Rhode Island, to my first honorable discharge at Treasure Island on August 27, 1957was in preparation to an understanding of World War II and the Cold War.

Presidents and Their Generals

Author: Matthew Moten

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 455

View: 251

Since 1945, as the U.S. has engaged in near-constant “wars of choice” with limited congressional oversight, the executive and armed services have shared primary responsibility for often ill-defined objectives, strategies, and benefits. Matthew Moten shows the significance of negotiations between presidents and the generals allied with them.

The Long War

A New History of U.S. National Security Policy Since World War II

Author: Andrew J. Bacevich

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 751

Essays by a diverse and distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and sociologists examine the alarms, emergencies, controversies, and confusions that have characterized America's Cold War, the post-Cold War interval of the 1990s, and today's "Global War on Terror." This "Long War" has left its imprint on virtually every aspect of American life; by considering it as a whole, The Long War is the first volume to take a truly comprehensive look at America's response to the national-security crisis touched off by the events of World War II. Contributors consider topics ranging from grand strategy and strategic bombing to ideology and economics and assess the changing American way of war and Hollywood's surprisingly consistent depiction of Americans at war. They evaluate the evolution of the national-security apparatus and the role of dissenters who viewed the myriad activities of that apparatus with dismay. They take a fresh look at the Long War's civic implications and its impact on civil-military relations. More than a military history, The Long War examines the ideas, policies, and institutions that have developed since the United States claimed the role of global superpower. This protracted crisis has become a seemingly permanent, if not defining aspect of contemporary American life. In breaking down the old and artificial boundaries that have traditionally divided the postwar period into neat historical units, this volume provides a better understanding of the evolution of the United States and U.S. policy since World War II and offers a fresh perspective on our current national security predicament.

Road to Iraq

Author: Muhammad Idrees Ahmad

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 552

Ahmad presents a social history of the war's leading agents "e; the neoconservatives "e; and shows how this ideologically coherent group of determined political agents used the contingency of 9/11 to overwhelm a sceptical foreign policy establishment, milit

The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S. Nuclear Strategy

Author: Terry Terriff

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 663

Schlesinger also stressed that the policy change was necessary because, with the Soviets' achievement of nuclear parity, the American nuclear defense of Western Europe was no longer a credible deterrent.

The Patterns of War Since the Eighteenth Century

Author: Larry H. Addington

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 141

“This important work . . . synthesizes the evolution of warfare from 1775 to the present.” —Military Review A thorough revision of a highly successful text, the second edition of this classic work provides a comprehensive picture of the evolution of modern warfare. Addington discusses developments in strategies and tactics, logistics and weaponry, and provides detailed discussions of important battles and campaigns. His book is an excellent introduction for both students and the general reader. “There is nothing else in print that tells so much so concisely about how war has been conducted since the days of General George Washington.” —Russell F. Weigley, author of The American Way of War “A superior synthesis. Well written, nicely organized, remarkably comprehensive, and laced with facts.” —Military Affairs

A Century of Spies

Intelligence in the Twentieth Century

Author: Jeffery T. Richelson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 581

Here is the ultimate inside history of twentieth-century intelligence gathering and covert activity. Unrivalled in its scope and as readable as any spy novel, A Century of Spies travels from tsarist Russia and the earliest days of the British Secret Service to the crises and uncertainties of today's post-Cold War world, offering an unsurpassed overview of the role of modern intelligence in every part of the globe. From spies and secret agents to the latest high-tech wizardry in signals and imagery surveillance, it provides fascinating, in-depth coverage of important operations of United States, British, Russian, Israeli, Chinese, German, and French intelligence services, and much more. All the key elements of modern intelligence activity are here. An expert whose books have received high marks from the intelligence and military communities, Jeffrey Richelson covers the crucial role of spy technology from the days of Marconi and the Wright Brothers to today's dazzling array of Space Age satellites, aircraft, and ground stations. He provides vivid portraits of spymasters, spies, and defectors--including Sidney Reilly, Herbert Yardley, Kim Philby, James Angleton, Markus Wolf, Reinhard Gehlen, Vitaly Yurchenko, Jonathan Pollard, and many others. Richelson paints a colorful portrait of World War I's spies and sabateurs, and illuminates the secret maneuvering that helped determine the outcome of the war on land, at sea, and on the diplomatic front; he investigates the enormous importance of intelligence operations in both the European and Pacific theaters in World War II, from the work of Allied and Nazi agents to the "black magic" of U.S. and British code breakers; and he gives us a complete overview of intelligence during the length of the Cold War, from superpower espionage and spy scandals to covert action and secret wars. A final chapter probes the still-evolving role of intelligence work in the new world of disorder and ethnic conflict, from the high-tech wonders of the Gulf War to the surprising involvement of the French government in industrial espionage. Comprehensive, authoritative, and addictively readable, A Century of Spies is filled with new information on a variety of subjects--from the activities of the American Black Chamber in the 1920s to intelligence collection during the Cuban missile crisis to Soviet intelligence and covert action operations. It is an essential volume for anyone interested in military history, espionage and adventure, and world affairs.