The Wild Trees

A Story of Passion and Daring with the World's Last True Explorers

Author: Richard Preston

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 320

View: 872

When Steve Sillett was 19 years old, he free-climbed – with no safety equipment and no training – one of the tallest trees on earth, in the redwood forests of Prairie Creek, California. 30 storeys above the ground he glimpsed an undiscovered ecosystem, and his passion for that astonishing world would transform the rest of his life. Over the next twenty years, Sillett and a close group of friends charted this system, discovering mosses and lichen never seen before, and travelling among branches so densely interwoven they form incredible sky-high walkways. There are only twenty people on earth who have climbed the world’s tallest trees and who know their location. In writing The Wild Trees, Richard Preston not only managed to gain access to this group, but began to climb these hidden giants himself, putting his life in danger in order to understand the powerful connection between the massive trees and the world’s last great explorers.

Non-wood Forest Products from Temperate Broad-leaved Trees

Author: William M. Ciesla

Publisher: Food & Agriculture Org.

ISBN:

Category: Evergreens, Broad-leaved

Page: 125

View: 358

Temperate broadleaved trees grow in very different ecosystems in the northern and southern hemispheres, but are also found extensively in many tropical and subtropical mountain areas. A wide range of non-wood products are derived from temperate broadleaved trees, and their description is organized in this volume according to the part of the tree from which they are obtained (whole tree, foliage, flowers, etc.). This information is presented in order to raise awareness on, and assist in identifying, opportunities for the management and production of non-wood products from temperate broadleaved trees. The intended audience of this publication ranges from interest groups in the forest, agriculture and rural development sectors to conservation agencies in developed and developing countries.

Christmas Trees for Pleasure

Author: Arthur Chapman

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 943

"This book should be required reading for the new or prospective Christmas tree grower." --Journal of Forestry The third edition of this successful book is for the farmer who has some extra land, for the prospective commercial grower with several hundred acres, or for the hobbyist who may want to supplement his income. Both the novice and the experienced grower will benefit from its account of growing Christmas trees for the market. Covering basic principles as well as specific practices, the book guides the reader through the various stages of establishing and maintaining a Christmas-tree plantation. Chapters provide important information on the selection of land, where to get planting stock, and factors that should be considered when deciding on what species to grow. The most critical job of all--the actual planting of the trees--is covered in depth. The authors present useful techniques for protecting the growing trees from weeds, insects, and diseases, and they offer a full description of shearing (or shaping) trees to improve their form and density--one of the keys to a successful crop. On the business side, issues of grading, harvesting, and marketing are examined. A chapter on taxes includes alternative methods of treating income and a concluding section gives the grower advice on obtaining further help. This new and updated edition also covers changes in the technology of planting and maintaining trees. Information on new uses of machinery, statistical details on plantations and acreage, and the most recent data on herbicides are also included. The late Arthur Chapman was chief of the Division of Forest Management Research at the Central States Forest Experiment Station in Columbus, Ohio. Robert Wray is retired from the U.S. Forest Service's North Central Forest Experiment Station where he was in charge of information services. He has written for various conservation and professional publications and continues to do contract editing for the Forest Service.

Olive Odyssey

Searching for the Secrets of the Fruit That Seduced the World

Author: Julie Angus

Publisher: Greystone Books

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 344

View: 990

When Julie Angus visits her relatives in Syria, where they continue a centuries-old tradition of making olive oil, she understands that the olive is at the very core of who they are. Her curiosity piqued, she begins to wonder about the origins and history of this fruit that has meant so much to them. Angus, her husband, and their ten-month-old son embark on a Mediterranean voyage to retrace the route of the Phoenicians and discover who ate the first olive and learned to make oil from it, why it became such an influential commodity for many of the greatest civilizations, and how it expanded from its earliest roots in the Middle East. As they sail the dazzling waters of the Mediterranean, Angus and her husband collect samples from ancient trees, testing them to determine where the first olive tree originated. They also feast on inky black tapenades in Cassis, nibble on codfish and chickpeas creamed in olive oil in Sardinia, witness the harvesting of olives in Greece, and visit perhaps the oldest olive tree in the world, on Crete.

The Man Who Planted Trees

A Story of Lost Groves, the Science of Trees, and a Plan to Save the Planet

Author: Jim Robbins

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 788

The Man Who Planted Trees is the inspiring story of David Milarch’s quest to clone the biggest trees on the planet in order to save our forests and ecosystem—as well as a hopeful lesson about how each of us has the ability to make a difference. “When is the best time to plant a tree? Twenty years ago. The second best time? Today.”—Chinese proverb Twenty years ago, David Milarch, a northern Michigan nurseryman with a penchant for hard living, had a vision: angels came to tell him that the earth was in trouble. Its trees were dying, and without them, human life was in jeopardy. The solution, they told him, was to clone the champion trees of the world—the largest, the hardiest, the ones that had survived millennia and were most resilient to climate change—and create a kind of Noah’s ark of tree genetics. Without knowing if the message had any basis in science, or why he’d been chosen for this task, Milarch began his mission of cloning the world’s great trees. Many scientists and tree experts told him it couldn’t be done, but, twenty years later, his team has successfully cloned some of the world’s oldest trees—among them giant redwoods and sequoias. They have also grown seedlings from the oldest tree in the world, the bristlecone pine Methuselah. When New York Times journalist Jim Robbins came upon Milarch’s story, he was fascinated but had his doubts. Yet over several years, listening to Milarch and talking to scientists, he came to realize that there is so much we do not yet know about trees: how they die, how they communicate, the myriad crucial ways they filter water and air and otherwise support life on Earth. It became clear that as the planet changes, trees and forest are essential to assuring its survival. Praise for The Man Who Planted Trees “This is a story of miracles and obsession and love and survival. Told with Jim Robbins’s signature clarity and eye for telling detail, The Man Who Planted Trees is also the most hopeful book I’ve read in years. I kept thinking of the end of Saint Francis’s wonderful prayer, ‘And may God bless you with enough foolishness to believe that you can make a difference in the world, so that you can do what others claim cannot be done.’ ”—Alexandra Fuller, author of Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight “Absorbing, eloquent, and loving . . . While Robbins’s tone is urgent, it doesn’t compromise his crystal-clear science. . . . Even the smallest details here are fascinating.”—Dominique Browning, The New York Times Book Review “The great poet W. S. Merwin once wrote, ‘On the last day of the world I would want to plant a tree.’ It’s good to see, in this lovely volume, that some folks are getting a head start!”—Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet “Inspiring . . . Robbins lucidly summarizes the importance and value of trees to planet Earth and all humanity.”—The Ecologist “ ‘Imagine a world without trees,’ writes journalist Jim Robbins. It’s nearly impossible after reading The Man Who Planted Trees, in which Robbins weaves science and spirituality as he explores the bounty these plants offer the planet.”—Audubon

1001 Questions Answered About Trees

Author: Rutherford Platt

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 352

View: 407

Fascinating, fact-filled reference provides detailed data about age, size, and weight; suggestions for identifying trees, what trees to look for in certain states, much more. Over 100 illustrations, 21 photographs.

Christianity and the Outsider

A Lawyer Looks at Justice and Justification

Author: James W. Geiger

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 214

View: 318

What does Christianity have to say about the salvation of the African tribesman who died before the missionaries arrived, and the great sorrow of the Messianic Jew who grieves for family and friends who did not or will not acknowledge his Jesus as their Messiah? C. S. Lewis said these outsiders represent the scandal of exclusivity. Jim Geiger is a Christian insider and fully committed to the exclusivity of Christ's atonement. However, he is suggesting an expanded Christology where: • The constant speed of light in E = mc2 corroborates the constant Christ of Heb 13:8. • Special and general relativity model special and general revelation. • The Christ of general revelation represents the hope of salvation for some of Christianity's outsiders.