The Wealth of Nations

Author: Adam Smith

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1200

View: 467

Adam Smith’s masterpiece, first published in 1776, is the foundation of modern economic thought and remains the single most important account of the rise of, and the principles behind, modern capitalism. Written in clear and incisive prose, The Wealth of Nations articulates the concepts indispensable to an understanding of contemporary society; and Robert Reich’s Introduction both clarifies Smith’s analyses and illuminates his overall relevance to the world in which we live. As Reich writes, “Smith’s mind ranged over issues as fresh and topical today as they were in the late eighteenth century—jobs, wages, politics, government, trade, education, business, and ethics.” Introduction by Robert Reich • Commentary by R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner • Includes a Modern Library Reading Group Guide

Wealth of Nations

Author: Adam Smith

Publisher: Wordsworth Classics of World Literature

ISBN:

Category: Economics

Page: 1008

View: 917

Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations is the first book of modern political economy, and still provides the foundation for the study of that discipline. Along with important discussions of economics and political theory, it mixes plain common sense with large measures of history, philosophy, psychology and sociology.

A Critical Bibliography of Adam Smith

Author: Hiroshi Mizuta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 416

View: 653

This critical bibliography of Adam Smith takes as its starting point the Kress Library of Business and Economics’ 1939 catalogue of its Vanderblue Collection of Smithiana. Since the bicentenary of The Wealth of Nations in 1976, the rate of international publication markedly accelerated, significantly extending the scope of this bibliography beyond 1939. Its scope has been further enlarged via the inclusion of essays on the diffusion process while the inclusion of all works in the chronological main bibliography gives an overview of the scope of this process. The notes appended to the entries provide a running commentary to the gathering pace of publication and the entries are organised chronologically with systematic annotation throughout.

On The Wealth of Nations

A Book that Shook the World

Author: P. J. O'Rourke

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 300

View: 851

A New York Times Bestseller As P. J. O'Rourke says, 'It's as if Smith, having proved that we can all have more money, then went on to prove that money doesn't buy happiness. And it doesn't. It rents it.' Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations was first published in 1776 and almost instantly was recognized as fundamental to an understanding of economics. It was also recognized as being really long and as P. J. O'Rourke points out, to understand The Wealth of Nations, the cornerstone of free-market thinking and a book that shapes the world to this day, you also need to peruse Smith's earlier doorstopper,The Theory of Moral Sentiments. But now you don't have to read either, because P. J. has done it for you. In this hilarious work P. J. shows us why Smith is still relevant, why what seems obvious now was once revolutionary, and how the division of labour, freedom of trade and pursuit of self-interest espoused by Smith are not only vital to the welfare of mankind, they're funny too. He goes on to establish that far from being an avatar of capitalism, Smith was actually a moralist of liberty. As P. J. says, 'It's as if Smith, having proved that we can all have more money, then went on to prove that money doesn't buy happiness. And it doesn't. It rents it.'

Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery

Author: David Warsh

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 764

"What The Double Helix did for biology, David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations does for economics." —Boston Globe A stimulating and inviting tour of modern economics centered on the story of one of its most important breakthroughs. In 1980, the twenty-four-year-old graduate student Paul Romer tackled one of the oldest puzzles in economics. Eight years later he solved it. This book tells the story of what has come to be called the new growth theory: the paradox identified by Adam Smith more than two hundred years earlier, its disappearance and occasional resurfacing in the nineteenth century, the development of new technical tools in the twentieth century, and finally the student who could see further than his teachers. Fascinating in its own right, new growth theory helps to explain dominant first-mover firms like IBM or Microsoft, underscores the value of intellectual property, and provides essential advice to those concerned with the expansion of the economy. Like James Gleick's Chaos or Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe, this revealing book takes us to the frontlines of scientific research; not since Robert Heilbroner's classic work The Worldly Philosophers have we had as attractive a glimpse of the essential science of economics.

Woody Allen and Philosophy

[You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong?]

Author: Mark T. Conard

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 250

View: 351

Fifteen philosophers representuing different schools of thought answer the question what is Woody Allen trying to say in his films? And why should anyone care? Focusing on different works and varied aspects of Allen's multifaceted output, these essays explore the philosophical undertones of Anne Hall, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Manhattan, A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy and reminds us that just because the universe is meaningless and life is pointless is no reason to commit suicide.

Handbook of the Economics of International Migration

Author: Barry Chiswick

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1702

View: 894

The economic literature on international migration interests policymakers as well as academics throughout the social sciences. These volumes, the first of a new subseries in the Handbooks in Economics, describe and analyze scholarship created since the inception of serious attention began in the late 1970s. This literature appears in the general economics journals, in various field journals in economics (especially, but not exclusively, those covering labor market and human resource issues), in interdisciplinary immigration journals, and in papers by economists published in journals associated with history, sociology, political science, demography, and linguistics, among others. Covers a range of topics from labor market outcomes and fiscal consequences to the effects of international migration on the level and distribution of income – and everything in between. Encompasses a wide range of topics related to migration and is multidisciplinary in some aspects, which is crucial on the topic of migration Appeals to a large community of scholars interested in this topic and for whom no overviews or summaries exist

The Consumption Reader

Author: David B. Clarke

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 255

This reader offers an essential selection of the best work on the Consumer Society. It brings together in an engaging, surprising, and thought provoking way, a diverse range of topics and theoretical perspectives.

Managerial Prerogative and the Question of Control (Routledge Revivals)

Author: John Storey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 238

In both Marxist and non-Marxist scholarship there has been a remarkable neglect of the managerial control of labour. John Storey’s analysis of the modern labour process shows that managerial control is in fact more precarious than has been so far recorded. This book, first published in 1983, reassesses the Braverman theory of the inexorable degradation of work, and demonstrates the need to go beyond not only Braverman but also most of the ensuing attempts to complement or repair his underlying thesis. The book will be of interest to students of the social sciences.