The Urie and Maunsell Cylinder 4-6-0s

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 264

View: 226

This book is one in the Pen & Sword Transport History imprint in the ‘Locomotive Portfolio’ series and covers the family of two-cylinder 4-6-0s designed and built by the Chief Mechanical Engineers of the London & South Western and Southern Railways between 1914 and 1936, which survived well into the era of British Railways. The N15 ‘King Arthur’ class of express passenger engines were the mainstay of the Southern Railway’s passenger business between the two world wars, but both Robert Urie and Richard Maunsell built mixed traffic and freight locomotives of a similar ilk forming a ‘King Arthur’ family of locomotives for all purposes that were simple, robust and long lived. This book describes the conception, design and construction of the N15, H15 and S15 classes and the N15X rebuilds of the LB&SCR ‘Baltic Tanks’ and their operation in traffic before and after the Second World War, until the withdrawal of the last Maunsell 4-6-0 in 1965. The book includes extensive personal recollections of the author, who both saw and travelled on hundreds of trains hauled by many of these engines in the 1950s and ‘60s, and gives a brief summary of those that have been preserved on Britain’s heritage railways. The book is copiously illustrated with over 200 black and white and colour illustrations.

Great Western Small-Wheeled Double-Framed 4-4-0 Tender Locomotives

Duke, Bulldog, Dukedog and 3521 Classes

Author: David Maidment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 256

View: 518

The Great Western Railway experienced the trauma and disruption of the end of the broad gauge in 1892 and were faced with equipping the network with suitable motive power, especially in Devon and Cornwall where the last track conversion had taken place. West of Newton Abbot, the GWR had relied on a variety of 4-4-0, 2-4-0, 0-4-2 and 0-4-4 side and saddle tanks, often doubled-headed, and Dean set about designing a sturdy outside-framed powerful 4-4-0 with 5ft 8in coupled wheels, the 'Dukes', to tackle increasing loads over the heavily graded main line. Then, Churchward came to assist the ailing Locomotive Superintendent, using his knowledge and experience of American and continental practice to develop the Dean designs. He improved the efficiency and performance of the boilers, using the Belgian Belpaire firebox, then developed the tapered 'cone' boiler, and applied it to the chassis of the 'Duke's to form the 'Camel' class, later known as the 'Bulldogs', which eventually numbered 156 locomotives. Finally, in the 1930s when engines of the 'Duke' route availability were still required but their frames were life-expired, their boilers were matched with the stronger frames of the 'Bulldogs' to form the 'Dukedog' class, which lasted until the 1950s, particularly on the former Cambrian lines in mid-Wales. This book recounts the design, construction and operation of these small-wheeled outside-framed locomotives with many rare photos of their operation in the first decade of the twentieth century as well as in more recent times.

The German Pacific Locomotive: Its Design and Development

Its Design and Development

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 400

View: 780

The German Pacific Locomotive (Its Design and Development) is David Maidments fourth book in the series of Locomotive Profiles published by Pen & Sword. It is the first in the series to tackle an important range of overseas steam locomotives, the German pacific locomotives, which, with the Paris-Orleans pacific in France, were the first of that wheel layout in Europe and came to be the dominant type for express passenger work throughout Western Europe for the following fifty years, until displaced by diesel and electric traction. The German railways in the first two decades of the twentieth century were run principally as regional State railways, and two distinct styles of design developed, which were influenced by the natural terrain. In the south, in the mountainous foothills of the European Alps, four cylinder compound locomotives with comparatively small coupled wheels, most produced by the famous firm of Maffei in Munich, held sway from 1907 until the late 1930s, and in parts of Bavaria that were not yet electrified, even until the early 1960s. In the flatter lands of the north, Prussian 4-6-0s sufficed until Paul Wagners standard two cylinder simple pacifics came onto the scene in 1925, and were followed by the three cylinder streamlined pacifics at the start of the Second World War. After addressing the devastating damage to the German railways in the conflict, the book follows the modernization of the locomotive fleet in the postwar period until the elimination of steam in both East and West Germany in the mid-late 1970s. The book describes the design, construction and operation of the full range of pacifics that ran in both parts of Germany, and the large numbers of these locomotives that have been preserved, and is illustrated with over 180 black and white and 80 colour photos.

The Southern Railway

Author: Roger Wakely Kidner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Southern Railway Company (Great Britain)

Page: 54

View: 859

Some classic locomotives

Author: Cuthbert Hamilton Ellis

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 173

View: 370

The Southern Railway, 1923-1947

A Chronicle and Record

Author: Raymond Arthur Savill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 30

View: 553

Yesterday's Railways

Recollections of an Age of Steam

Author: Peter Herring

Publisher: David & Charles Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 288

View: 180

Britons have always viewed their railway system with a mixture of affection, amusement and exasperation. Yet there were also periods in the twentieth century when Britain's railways were a source of pride and excitement. Many still recall when the train was their principal means of travel, whether to school or work, to visit friends and relatives, or to go on holiday. And it wasn't just people that went by train: the food that fed them, the bricks that built their homes, the coal that heated them, were all carried by train. This book celebrates this time when a train journey remained an adventure, and when the steam locomotives that made the journey possible were a source of awe and fascination. Those journeys are recalled in Yesterday's Railways, alongside the eventful journey made by all of Britain's railways from the ground-breaking years of the 1900s to the day in August 1968 that the fires were put out for the last time.