The Third World Century

Author: Charles Stewart Goodwin

Publisher: University Press of Amer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 398

This book theorizes that the basic civilizational pillars of family, community, tradition and faith are severely eroding in the industrial/technological West. This has caused Western civilization itself to enter a period of fragmentation and decline. In The Third World Century, Charles Goodwin assesses the present aspect and ambiance of western civilization with an eye to its prospects. The author also evaluates those civilizational forces emerging on the periphery as the weakening of the West's fundamental societal pillars allows them to gather momentum from their bases in the Third World. Contents: Acknowledgements; Preface; Introduction; THE POST WORLD WAR II ORDER CRUMBLES; Disintegration of The Second World; Russia: Past and Prognosis; The New Chinese Empire: A Peoples Republic Colossus; The First World Flounders; Technology: Monster or Messiah?; A Bankruptcy of Precepts; The Future of the Republican Ideal; THE TEMPORARY RISE OF SPHERISM; Atrophy of Internationalism: Growth of Super Spheres; Spherical Tensions; New Combinations and Configurations; INSIDE THE THIRD WORLD ORDER; Quadruple Basics; Fundamental Values and Structures; TESSERAE OF THE EMERGING MOSAIC; The Evolution of Socio-Politics; Post Technological Polity.

The State and Development in the Third World

A World Politics Reader

Author: Atul Kohli

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 298

View: 175

The articles in this volume appeared first in the leading jounial World Politics. The essayists' common concern with the autonomy of the political " in the politics of developing countries contributes to the analytical unity of the volume. Originally published in 1986. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Poltiical Change in the Third World

Author: Charles Andrain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 957

In this informative and highly readable book, first published in 1988, Charles Andrain explores the ways in which public policies and socio-political beliefs and structures cause political change in the Third World. The author examines 3 types of political change: (1) transitions in political leaders and their policies, (2) fundamental transformations in political structures, policy priorities, and political strategies for dealing with policy issues; and (3) the impact of economic, education, and health care policies on the society itself (including changes in unemployment, inflation, economic growth, literacy and birth and death rates). In the first part of the book, Professor Andrain presents a general overview of political change in the Third World, explaining how different models of political systems explain the dynamics of political events in Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. In the second part of the book, he then applies these models to specific changes in five developing nations: Vietnam, Cuba, Chile, Nigeria and Iran. The book is unique in its careful blending of a policy focus with a structural analysis of nation states, domestic social groups, and international institutions in the often turbulent regions of the developing world. It thus provides a very useful systematic approach to political developments in the Third World that will be welcomed by students, faculty and general readers.

Medicine in the Twentieth Century

Author: Roger Cooter

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 780

View: 168

During the twentieth century, medicine has been radically transformed and powerfully transformative. In 1900, western medicine was important to philanthropy and public health, but it was marginal to the state, the industrial economy and the welfare of most individuals. It is now central to these aspects of life. Our prospects seem increasingly dependent on the progress of bio-medical sciences and genetic technologies which promise to reshape future generations. The editors of Medicine in the Twentieth Century have commissioned over forty authoritative essays, written by historical specialists but intended for general audiences. Some concentrate on the political economy of medicine and health as it changed from period to period and varied between countries, others focus on understandings of the body, and a third set of essays explores transformations in some of the theatres of medicine and the changing experiences of different categories of practitioners and patients.

Companion Encyclopedia of Medicine in the Twentieth Century

Author: Roger Cooter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 776

View: 552

During the twentieth century, medicine has been radically transformed and powerfully transformative. In 1900, western medicine was important to philanthropy and public health, but it was marginal to the state, the industrial economy and the welfare of most individuals. It is now central to these aspects of life. Our prospects seem increasingly dependent on the progress of bio-medical sciences and genetic technologies which promise to reshape future generations. The editors of Medicine in the Twentieth Century have commissioned over forty authoritative essays, written by historical specialists but intended for general audiences. Some concentrate on the political economy of medicine and health as it changed from period to period and varied between countries, others focus on understandings of the body, and a third set of essays explores transformations in some of the theatres of medicine and the changing experiences of different categories of practitioners and patients.

Industrialization and Development in the Third World

Author: Rajesh Chandra

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 620

Developing countries have undergone significant industrialization in the last three decades. Yet industrial growth reveals marked spatial inequalities in terms of both country and location. The Newly Industrialised Countries have achieved spectacular growth in sharp contrast to many other countries of the South. Industrial structure has changed, moving away from labour intensive industries to more technologically advanced manufacturing. Developing countries have had considerable success in penetrating developed country markets but they are now encountering more market restrictions. The role of the government in the development of the economy is also changing. Increasingly, countries are turning towards export-orientated industrialization strategies and privatization whilst their governments are emphasising their facilitative role.

Imperialism and the Developing World

How Britain and the United States Shaped the Global Periphery

Author: Atul Kohli

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 544

View: 703

How did Western imperialism shape the developing world? In Imperialism and the Developing World, Atul Kohli tackles this question by analyzing British and American influence on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America from the age of the British East India Company to the most recent U.S. war in Iraq. He argues that both Britain and the U.S. expanded to enhance their national economic prosperity, and shows how Anglo-American expansionism hurt economic development in poor parts of the world. To clarify the causes and consequences of modern imperialism, Kohli first explains that there are two kinds of empires and analyzes the dynamics of both. Imperialism can refer to a formal, colonial empire such as Britain in the 19th century or an informal empire, wielding significant influence but not territorial control, such as the U.S. in the 20th century. Kohli contends that both have repeatedly undermined the prospects of steady economic progress in the global periphery, though to different degrees. Time and again, the pursuit of their own national economic prosperity led Britain and the U.S. to expand into peripheral areas of the world. Limiting the sovereignty of other states-and poor and weak states on the periphery in particular-was the main method of imperialism. For the British and American empires, this tactic ensured that peripheral economies would stay open and accessible to Anglo-American economic interests. Loss of sovereignty, however, greatly hurt the life chances of people living in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. As Kohli lays bare, sovereignty is an economic asset; it is a precondition for the emergence of states that can foster prosperous and inclusive industrial societies.