The Structure of Creole Words

Segmental, Syllabic and Morphological Aspects

Author: Parth Bhatt

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 412

This volume brings together articles that are focused on segmental, syllabic and morphological aspects of creole words, thus contributing to the ongoing debates about the nature of phonology and morphology and their role in emergence and development of these languages. The papers cover a wide range of creole languages with different lexifier languages and address empirical, typological, historical and theoretical issues, drawing our attention to hitherto unknown phenomena or offering interesting new analyses of established facts. With contributions from: Parth Bhatt, Alain Kihm, Thomas Klein, Emmanuel Nikiema, Ingo Plag, Marina Pucciarelli, Jean-Louis Rougé, Eric Russel-Webb, Shobha Satyanath, Emmanuel Schang, Mareile Schramm, Norval Smith, Marleen van de Vate and Tonjes Veenstra.

The Haitian Creole Language

History, Structure, Use, and Education

Author: Arthur K. Spears

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 926

The Haitian Creole Language is the first book dealing with the central role of Creole in Haiti and the Haitian diaspora, especially in the United States. Dispelling myths about Creole, with discussions of Haitian and Haitian Creole history, it provides a foundation for educators, service providers, policy makers, social scientists, and language and literature scholars to understand Creole in its historical, social, political, educational, and economic developmental contexts.

Roots of Creole Structures

Weighing the Contribution of Substrates and Superstrates

Author: Susanne Michaelis

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 425

View: 598

This book reflects an ongoing shift in the study of contact languages: After a period of history-free universalism, it directs the attention to the individual historical circumstances under which the pidgin and creole languages arose. The contributions deal with different areas of language structure including phonology, morphology, and syntax, providing a wealth of structural and sociohistorical data that any comprehensive theory of contact languages will have to account for. Each of the papers provides a thorough description of a structural phenomenon against the background of the sociohistorical contact situation. The languages covered in the book are: Guiné-Bissau Creole, Haitian Creole, Hawai'i Creole, Indo-Portuguese creoles, Jamaican Creole, Lingua Franca, North American French, Mauritian Creole, Santomense, Saramaccan, Seychelles Creole, Sranan, Surinamese Maroon creoles, Vincentian Creole, and Zamboangueño Chavacano.

The Atlas of Pidgin and Creole Language Structures

Author: Susanne Maria Michaelis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 522

View: 811

The Atlas presents commentaries and colour maps showing how 130 linguistic features - phonological, syntactic, morphological, and lexical - are distributed among the world's pidgins and creoles. Designed and written by the world's leading experts, it is a unique resource of outstanding value for linguists of all persuasions throughout the world.

Structure and Variation in Language Contact

Author: Ana Deumert

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 376

View: 989

This volume presents a careful selection of fifteen articles presented at the SPCL meetings in Atlanta, Boston and Hawai'i in 2003 and 2004. The contributions reflect - from various perspectives and using different types of data - on the interplay between structure and variation in contact languages, both synchronically and diachronically. The contributors consider a wide range of languages, including Surinamese creoles, Chinook Jargon, Yiddish, AAVE, Haitian Creole, Afro-Hispanic and Afro-Portuguese varieties, Nigerian Pidgin, Sri Lankan Malay, Papiamentu, and Bahamian Creole English (Hackert). A need to question and test existing claims regarding pidginization/creolization is evident in all contributions, and the authors provide analyses for a variety of grammatical structures: VO-ordering and affixation, agglutination, negation, TMAs, plural marking, the copula, and serial verb constructions. The volume provides ample evidence for the observation that pidgin/creole studies is today a mature subfield of linguistics which is making important contributions to general linguistic theory.

The Emergence of Creole Syllable Structure

A Cross-linguistic Study

Author: Mareile Schramm

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 335

View: 213

This book presents an empirical study of syllable structure and phonotactic restructuring in six Caribbean creoles with Dutch, English and French as main lexifier languages. It is shown that, although some structures are more commonly permitted than others, there is considerable cross-creole variation, especially with respect to word-final structures. The findings provide support for recent SLA approaches to the emergence of creole phonology.

Pidgins and Creoles: Volume 1, Theory and Structure

Author: John A. Holm

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 353

This first volume of Holm's major survey of pidgins and creoles provides an up-to-date and readable introduction to a field of study that has become established only in the past few decades. Written for both students and general readers with a basic knowledge of linguistics, the book's original perspective will also attract specialists in the field seeking a broad overview of the linguistic relationships among these languages. Creolized, or restructured versions of English, French, Spanish, Dutch, Portugese, and other languages arose during European colonial expansion. These resulted in such creoles as Jamaican, Haitian, Papiamentu, and some one hundred others, as well as such semi-creoles as Afrikaans, non-standard Brazilian Portugese, Papiamentu, and American Black English. Scholars have tended to work on particular language varieties in relative isolation, making comparative research into the genesis, development, and structure of creoles difficult. In writing this book, Holm draws on broad studies of many languages to make clear how far-reaching creoles'similarities are and to challenge current linguistic theories on creoles and pidgins. The emphasis of this volume is largely empirical rather than descriptive. Its core is a comparative study of creoles based on European languages in Africa and the Caribbean that demonstrates the striking similarities among the languages in terms of their lexical semantics, phonology, and syntax. A forthcoming volume provides a socio-historic overview of variety development and text examples, with translations, of the restructured languages.

The Structure and Status of Pidgins and Creoles

Including Selected Papers from the Meetings of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics

Author: Arthur Kean Spears

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 461

View: 195

Destined to become a landmark work, this book is devoted principally to a reassessment of the content, categories, boundaries, and basic assumptions of pidgin and creole studies. It includes revised and elaborated papers from meetings of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics in addition to commissioned papers from leading scholars in the field. As a group, the papers undertake this reassessment through a reevaluation of pidgin/creole terminology and contact language typology (Section One); a requestioning of process and evolution in pidginization, creolization, and other language contact phenomena (Section Two); a reinterpretation of the sources and genesis of grammatical aspects of Saramaccan and Atlantic creoles in general (Section Three); a reconsideration of the status of languages defying received definitions of pidgins and creoles (Section Four); and analyses of aspects of grammar that shed light on the issue of what a possible creole grammar is (Section Five).

Word-formation and Creolisation

The Case of Early Sranan

Author: Maria Braun

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 309

View: 986

This book presents a comprehensive account of the word-formation patterns of an Englishbased creole language, Sranan, as found in the earliest sources of this language, and compares them systematically with the patterns attested in the input languages. The findings are discussed in the light of recent creolisation theories and a number of important conclusions are drawn about the nature of creole word-formation, as well as about the role of second language acquisition, universals, substrates and superstrates in the emergence of the creole lexicon and creole languages in general.

Investigating Language as Social (Inter-)Action

The 15th Conference on British and American Studies

Author: Marinela Burada

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 305

View: 926

This volume consists of papers presented during the 15th Conference on British and American Studies, held at Transilvania University of Brașov, Romania. It reflects the work conducted by senior and junior researchers on a range of interesting topics falling into the wider scope of cognitive linguistics, language contact, translation and lexicography. The investigations reported here are streamlined into three chapters. The first, “Native Language Explorations and Acquisition”, has Romanian as its central theme. The second chapter, “Aspects of English – Insights into its Impact, Structure, and Descriptive Potential”, centres around the English language considered both as an object of academic inquiry in its own right, and against a larger cultural backdrop. The final chapter, “Translatability of Language, Translatability of Culture”, looks into matters concerning intra- and inter-linguistic translation, and their impact on intercultural communication.

Development and Structures of Creole Languages

Essays in Honor of Derek Bickerton

Author: Francis Byrne

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 222

View: 237

This collection of original essays is intended to both celebrate Derek Bickerton's sixty-fifth birthday and honor his long and eminent career. Each author included in the volume is a noted scholar who has distinguished him/herself in some area of linguistics and has professionally or personally interacted with Bickerton and been influenced by his work. While the papers make independent thematic contributions, they also discuss, augment, present alternatives to, or are inspired in some way by Bickerton's seminal ideas or penetrating analyses. The book is organized into 5 sections, each a reflection of a major research period in Bickerton's career: Section 1: Identifying Creoles; Section 2: Language Variation; Section 3: Creole Processes; Section 4: Creole Syntax and Semantics; Section 5: Serial Verbs.

Creole Formation as Language Contact

The Case of the Suriname Creoles

Author: Bettina Migge

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 149

View: 815

The research on the formation of (radical) creoles has seen an unprecedented intensification and diversification in the last 20 years. This book discusses, illustrates, and evaluates current research on creole formation based on an in-depth investigation of the processes and mechanisms that contributed to the emergence of the morphosyntactic system of the creoles of Suriname. The study draws on a rich corpus of a) natural conversational and elicited synchronic linguistic data from the Eastern Maroon Creole (EMC) and its main African substrate language, Gbe, b) published diachronic data from the EMC s sister-language Sranan Tongo, and c) information on the early history of Suriname coming from socio-historical investigations. It suggests that mechanisms of deliberate and contact-induced change also involved in borrowing and particularly shift situations led to the initial formation of the creoles of Suriname while language-internal change played a role in their subsequent development.

L2 Acquisition and Creole Genesis

Dialogues

Author: Claire Lefebvre

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 433

View: 542

In this volume, second language (L2) acquisition researchers and creolists engage in a dialogue, focusing on processes at work in L2 acquisition and creole genesis. The volume opens with an overview of the relationship between L2 acquisition and pidgins/creoles (Siegel). The first group of papers addresses current language contact at a societal or an individual level (Smith; Terrill and Dunn; Bruhn de Garavito and Atoche; Liceras et al.; Muller). The second section focuses on processes characterizing various stages of L2 acquisition and creole genesis: relexification and transfer from the L1 and their role in the initial state (Sprouse; Schwartz; Kouwenberg; Aboh; Ionin). Chapters in the third section discuss processes involved in developing grammars, namely, reanalysis and restructuring (Sanchez; Brousseau and Nikiema; Steele and Brousseau). The final section concentrates on fossilization and the end state (Cornips and Hulk; Montrul; Lardiere). Between them, the chapters cover lexical, morphological, phonological, semantic and syntactic properties of interlanguage grammars and creole grammars.

Language Change in Contact Languages

Grammatical and prosodic considerations

Author: J. Clancy Clements

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 241

View: 846

The studies in Language Change in Contact Languages showcase the contributions that the study of contact language varieties make to the understanding of phenomena such as relexification, transfer, reanalysis, grammaticalization, prosodic variation and the development of prosodic systems. Four of the studies deal with morphosyntactic issues while the other three address questions of prosody. The studies include data from the Atlantic creoles (Saramaccan, Sranan, Haitian Creole, Jamaican Creole, Trinidadian Creole, Papiamentu), as well as Singapore English. This volume, originally published as special issue of Studies in Language 33:2 (2009), aims to make the work of several language contact experts available to a wider audience. The studies will be of use to any student or scholar interested in different approaches to contact-induced language processes, particularly as they relate to morphosyntax and prosody.

Social Lives in Language--sociolinguistics and Multilingual Speech Communities

Celebrating the Work of Gillian Sankoff

Author: Gillian Sankoff

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 365

View: 274

This volume offers a synthetic approach to language variation and language ideologies in multilingual communities. Although the vast majority of the world s speech communities are multilingual, much of sociolinguistics ignores this internal diversity. This volume fills this gap, investigating social and linguistic dimensions of variation and change in multilingual communities. Drawing on research in a wide range of countries (Canada, USA, South Africa, Australia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu), it explores: connections between the fields of creolistics, language/dialect contact, and language acquisition; how the study of variation and change, particularly in cases of additive bilingualism, is central to understanding social and linguistic issues in multilingual communities; how changing language ideologies and changing demographics influence language choice and/or language policy, and the pivotal place of multilingualism in enacting social power and authority, and a rich array of new empirical findings on the dynamics of multilingual speech communities.

The Structure and Status of Pidgins and Creoles

Including selected papers from meetings of the Society for Pidgin and Creole linguistics

Author: Arthur K. Spears

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 461

View: 294

Destined to become a landmark work, this book is devoted principally to a reassessment of the content, categories, boundaries, and basic assumptions of pidgin and creole studies. It includes revised and elaborated papers from meetings of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics in addition to commissioned papers from leading scholars in the field. As a group, the papers undertake this reassessment through a reevaluation of pidgin/creole terminology and contact language typology (Section One); a requestioning of process and evolution in pidginization, creolization, and other language contact phenomena (Section Two); a reinterpretation of the sources and genesis of grammatical aspects of Saramaccan and Atlantic creoles in general (Section Three); a reconsideration of the status of languages defying received definitions of pidgins and creoles (Section Four); and analyses of aspects of grammar that shed light on the issue of what a possible creole grammar is (Section Five).

Creole Studies – Phylogenetic Approaches

Author: Peter Bakker

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 414

View: 491

This book launches a new approach to creole studies founded on phylogenetic network analysis. Phylogenetic approaches offer new visualisation techniques and insights into the relationships between creoles and non-creoles, creoles and other contact varieties, and between creoles and lexifier languages. With evidence from creole languages in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific, the book provides new perspectives on creole typology, cross-creole comparisons, and creole semantics. The book offers an introduction for newcomers to the fields of creole studies and phylogenetic analysis. Using these methods to analyse a variety of linguistic features, both structural and semantic, the book then turns to explore old and new questions and problems in creole studies. Original case studies explore the differences and similarities between creoles, and propose solutions to the problems of how to classify creoles and how they formed and developed. The book provides a fascinating glimpse into the unity and heterogeneity of creoles and the areal influences on their development. It also provides metalinguistic discussions of the “creole” concept from different perspectives. Finally, the book reflects critically on the findings and methods, and sets new agendas for future studies. Creole Studies has been written for a broad readership of scholars and students in the fields of contact linguistics, biolinguistics, sociolinguistics, language typology, and semantics.

The Emergence of Creole Syllable Structure

A Cross-linguistic Study

Author: Mareile Schramm

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 335

View: 592

This book presents an empirical study of syllable structure and phonotactic restructuring in six Caribbean creoles with Dutch, English and French as main lexifier languages. It is shown that, although some structures are more commonly permitted than others, there is considerable cross-creole variation, especially with respect to word-final structures. The findings provide support for recent SLA approaches to the emergence of creole phonology.

Issues in the Study of Pidgin and Creole Languages

Author: Claire Lefebvre

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 358

View: 185

The content of this book is concerned with various issues at stake in Creole studies that are also of interest for general linguistics. These include the general issue of Creole genesis and of the accelerated linguistic change that characterizes the emergence of these languages as compared to ordinary cases of linguistic change, the problem of the development of morphology in incipient Creoles, the problem of the validity of data in linguistic analysis, the issue of multifunctionality as regards the concept of lexical entry, the question of whether Creole languages are semantically more transparent than languages not known as Creoles, the issue of whether Creole languages constitute a typologically identifiable class and the problem of the interaction between the processes involved in the emergence and development of Creole languages. The purpose of this book is to present the major debates that are currently taking place in the field of Creole studies; evaluate the arguments against data (mainly drawn from Haitian Creole); and address the issues at stake within the framework of new paradigms. The various positions on each issue are summarized on the basis of a thorough review of the literature.

Noun Phrases in Creole Languages

A Multi-faceted Approach

Author: Marlyse Baptista

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 493

View: 625

This volume offers a thorough examination of the syntactic, semantic, pragmatic and discourse properties of noun phrases in a wide variety of creole (and non-creole) languages including Cape Verdean Creole, Santome, Papiamentu, Guinea-Bissau Creole, Mindanao Chabacano, Réunionnais Creole, Lesser Antillean, Haitian Creole, Mauritian Creole, Seychellois, Sranan, Jamaican Creole, Berbice Dutch Creole and African American English. Comparative studies also consider the determiner systems of Middle and Modern French, European Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish, Ewe, Fon and Gun. This compilation of 16 chapters brings together descriptive, theoretical, diachronic and synchronic studies that focus on the structure and interpretation of bare nouns in creoles. The contributions demonstrate the variety and complex nature of determiner systems in creoles and their widespread use of bare nouns in comparison to their source languages. This volume is evidence of the relevance of creole languages to theories of language creation, language change and linguistic theory in general.