The Story Cure

An A-Z of Books to Keep Kids Happy, Healthy and Wise

Author: Susan Elderkin

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 352

View: 271

The stories that shape our children's lives are too important to be left to chance. With The Story Cure, bibliotherapists Ella Berthoud and Susan Elderkin have put together the perfect manual for grown-ups who want to initiate young readers into one of life's greatest pleasures. There's a remedy for every hiccup and heartache, whether it's between the covers of a picture book, a pop-up book, or a YA novel. You'll find old favourites like The Borrowers and The Secret Garden alongside modern soon-to-be classics by Michael Morpurgo, Malorie Blackman and Frank Cottrell-Boyce, as well as helpful lists of the right reads to fuel any obsession - from dogs or dinosaurs, space or spies. Wise and witty, The Story Cure will help any small person you know through the trials and tribulations of growing up, and help you fill their bookshelves with adventure, insight and a lifetime of fun.

The Story Cure

A Book Doctor's Pain-Free Guide to Finishing Your Novel or Memoir

Author: Dinty W. Moore

Publisher: Ten Speed Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 915

A collection of cures for writer's block, plotting and characterization issues, and other ailments writers face when completing a novel or memoir, prescribed by the director of creative writing at Ohio University. People want to write the book they know is inside of them, but they run into stumbling blocks that trouble everyone from beginners to seasoned writers. Drawing on his years of teaching at both the university level and at writing workshops across the country, Professor Dinty W. Moore dons his book-doctor hat to present an authoritative guide to curing the issues that truly plague writers at all levels. His hard-hitting handbook provides inspiring solutions for diagnoses such as character anemia, flat plot, and silent voice, and is peppered with flashes of Moore's signature wit and unique take on the writing life.

Never Enough: The Story of The Cure

Author: Jeff Apter

Publisher: Omnibus Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 352

View: 259

The Cure emerged in the post-punk 70s and defied all expectations to launch a marathon career marked by hit records and a string of sell-out arena shows. In 2004, after numerous personnel changes, the band delivered their Greatest Hits album in 2004.This biography traces the roots in middle-class Crawley, Sussex and tracks their gradual rise, revealing how their first major album Pornography, almost ended the band well before their multi-platinum career began. It also documents Smith's escape into the Siouxsie & The Banshees camp during the Eighties, his experimentation with every drug ('bar smack'). His reluctance to return to The Cure which would eventually lead to them becoming superstars, not only on both sides of the Atlantic but all around the globe.Jeff Apter is an Australian-based music writer, who had been reporting on popular culture for the past 15 years. He spent five years as the Music Editor at Australian Rolling Stone. This is his third book, the first two being on The Red Hot Chili Peppers (published by Omnibus Press) and Silverchair.Paperback edition.

Tuberculosis

The Greatest Story Never Told : the Human Story of the Search for the Cure for Tuberculosis and the New Global Threat

Author: Frank Ryan

Publisher: FPR-Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Tuberculosis

Page: 446

View: 774

Tuberculosis is the greatest killer of all time. In this century and the previous one, it was responsible for the deaths of a thousand million human beings. Half way through the 20th century, people did not believe that a cure would ever be possible, but a few scientists throughout the world each played a part in finding that cure. The discovery changed history, yet that story has never been told.

The Cure

A Story of Cancer and Politics from the Annals of the Cold War

Author: Nikolai Krementsov

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 277

View: 134

Did America try to steal Soviet "cancer secrets"? And how could a cancer cure turn into a "biological atomic bomb"? Nikolai Krementsov's compelling tale of cancer and politics is the story of a husband-and-wife team who developed a promising anticancer treatment in Stalin's Russia, only to see their discovery entangled in Cold War rivalries, ideological conflict, and scientific turf wars. In 1946, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin announced the discovery of a preparation able to "dissolve" tumors in mice. Preliminary clinical trials suggested that KR, named after its developers, might work in humans as well. Media hype surrounding KR prompted the U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union to seek U.S.-Soviet cooperation in perfecting the possible cure. But the escalating Cold War gave this American interest a double edge. Though it helped Kliueva and Roskin solicit impressive research support from the Soviet leadership, including Stalin, it also thrust the couple into the center of an ideological confrontation between the superpowers. Accused of divulging "state secrets" to America, the couple were put on a show trial, and their "antipatriotic sins" were condemned in Soviet stage and film productions. Parlaying their notoriety into increased funding, Kliueva and Roskin continued their research, but envious colleagues discredited their work and took over their institute. For years, work on KR languished and ceased entirely with the deaths of Kliueva and Roskin. But recently, the Russian press reported that work on KR has begun again, reopening this illuminating story of the intersection among Cold War politics, personal ideals, and biomedical research.

The Cure

... and the Story of Anana's Slavery

Author: F. David Raymond, Sr.

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 92

View: 834

In the 70s, a small group of men were engaged in a covert operation in Africa. At the end of the operation a decision was made to bring some refugees to the states. Time has passed and one of the little girls has become a very popular prostitute on the streets of LA. She has been murdered and routine blood tests has revealed that not only was she disease free but her blood could contain a cure for AIDS and several other diseases. During the routine process of disposing of the remains, she is cremated and the extra blood is destroyed. A search begins for her family. The search involves the LAPD, they bring in ICE and they bring in the DOD and the CIA. This is no simple missing person case. The last surviving member of the original mission is required to go to Africa. Our story follows a simple school teacher who has to take a leave of absence to try to find the cure for AIDS.

Miracle Cure

The Story of Penicillin and the Golden Age of Antibiotics

Author: Milton Wainwright

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 196

View: 323

A readable and non-specialist account of the discovery of penicillin, streptomycin and other antibiotics; recent developments and future prospects.

Seeking the Cure

A History of Medicine in America

Author: Ira Rutkow

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 368

View: 615

A timely, authoritative, and entertaining history of medicine in America by an eminent physician Despite all that has been written and said about American medicine, narrative accounts of its history are uncommon. Until Ira Rutkow’s Seeking the Cure, there have been no modern works, either for the lay reader or the physician, that convey the extraordinary story of medicine in the United States. Yet for more than three centuries, the flowering of medicine—its triumphal progress from ignorance to science—has proven crucial to Americans’ under-standing of their country and themselves. Seeking the Cure tells the tale of American medicine with a series of little-known anecdotes that bring to life the grand and unceasing struggle by physicians to shed unsound, if venerated, beliefs and practices and adopt new medicines and treatments, often in the face of controversy and scorn. Rutkow expertly weaves the stories of individual doctors—what they believed and how they practiced—with the economic, political, and social issues facing the nation. Among the book’s many historical personages are Cotton Mather, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington (whose timely adoption of a controversial medical practice probably saved the Continental Army), Benjamin Rush, James Garfield (who was killed by his doctors, not by an assassin’s bullet), and Joseph Lister. The book touches such diverse topics as smallpox and the Revolutionary War, the establishment of the first medical schools, medicine during the Civil War, railroad medicine and the beginnings of specialization, the rise of the medical-industrial complex, and the thrilling yet costly advent of modern disease-curing technologies utterly unimaginable a generation ago, such as gene therapies, body scanners, and robotic surgeries. In our time of spirited national debate over the future of American health care amid a seemingly infinite flow of new medical discoveries and pharmaceutical products, Rutkow’s account provides readers with an essential historic, social, and even philosophical context. Working in the grand American literary tradition established by such eminent writer-doctors as Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Carlos Williams, Sherwin Nuland, and Oliver Sacks, he combines the historian’s perspective with the physician’s seasoned expertise. Capacious, learned, and gracefully told, Seeking the Cure will satisfy armchair historians and doctors alike, for, as Rutkow shows, the history of American medicine is a portrait of America itself.

Jesus, the Sabbath and the Jewish Debate

Healing on the Sabbath in the 1st and 2nd Centuries CE

Author: Nina L. Collins

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 843

The claim that Jesus was criticised by the Pharisees for performing cures on the Sabbath has been continuously repeated for almost 2,000 years. But a meticulous, unprejudiced evaluation of the relevant gospel texts shows that the historical Jesus was never criticised by historical Pharisees for performing Sabbath cures. In fact, Jesus and the Pharisees were in complete agreement for the need for cures on the Sabbath day. It is also clear that the Sabbath healing events in the gospels have preserved a significant part of the history of the early Jewish debate which sought to resolve the apparent conflict between the demands of Jewish law, and the performance of deeds of healing and/or saving life. This debate, from its Maccabean origins through to the end of the second century CE, is the subject of this book. The story of the debate has escaped the attention of historians partly because it relies on the evidence of both the early postbiblical Jewish texts and the Christian gospels, which are not generally studied together.