The Promise of Cinema

German Film Theory, 1907–1933

Author: Anton Kaes

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 704

View: 854

Rich in implications for our present era of media change, The Promise of Cinema offers a compelling new vision of film theory. The volume conceives of “theory” not as a fixed body of canonical texts, but as a dynamic set of reflections on the very idea of cinema and the possibilities once associated with it. Unearthing more than 275 early-twentieth-century German texts, this ground-breaking documentation leads readers into a world that was striving to assimilate modernity’s most powerful new medium. We encounter lesser-known essays by Béla Balázs, Walter Benjamin, and Siegfried Kracauer alongside interventions from the realms of aesthetics, education, industry, politics, science, and technology. The book also features programmatic writings from the Weimar avant-garde and from directors such as Fritz Lang and F.W. Murnau. Nearly all documents appear in English for the first time; each is meticulously introduced and annotated. The most comprehensive collection of German writings on film published to date, The Promise of Cinema is an essential resource for students and scholars of film and media, critical theory, and European culture and history.

The Cinema of Michael Winterbottom

Borders, Intimacy, Terror

Author: Bruce Bennett

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 430

This comprehensive study of prolific British filmmaker Michael Winterbottom explores the thematic, stylistic, and intellectual consistencies running through his eclectic and controversial body of work. This volume undertakes a close analysis of a TV series directed by Winterbottom and sixteen of his films ranging from television dramas to transnational co-productions featuring Hollywood stars, and from documentaries to costume films. The critique is centered on Winterbottom's collaborative working practices, political and cultural contexts, and critical reception. Arguing that his work delineates a 'cinema of borders', this study examines Winterbottom's treatment of sexuality, class, ethnicity, and national and international politics, as well as his quest to adequately narrate inequality, injustice, and violence.

Visions of Japanese Modernity

Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925

Author: Aaron Andrew Gerow

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 323

View: 741

"Visions of Japanese Modernity is the single best account of the formation of Japanese cinema. Deftly drawing on film discourses, regulations, and exhibition practices, it brilliantly brings into focus one of the most exuberant and contested moments in the history of cinema. It not only sets new standards for film history but also plants the seeds for a counterhistory to cinema as such."--Thomas LaMarre, author of The Anime Machine: A Media Theory of Animation "In this landmark study, Aaron Gerow richly demonstrates the vibrancy of Japanese film culture as no book has done before. Visions of Japanese Modernity is centered on the contentious Pure Film Movement, and the transformations it helped provoke in performance, screenwriting, censorship, film style, and benshi oratory. With virtually no extant films to work with, Gerow strategically turns to a multitude of other sources, including fanzines, popular movie magazines, sociological studies, government regulations, and impressive works of early film theory. Rich in detail and lucidly argued, Visions of Modernity provides a model for writing about filmmaking in its social, political and aesthetic contexts."--Abé Mark Nornes, author of Cinema Babel: Translating Global Cinema "Gerow offers not only a benchmark in the study of Japanese cinema, but a major contribution to world film history; a thoroughly researched and complexly argued 'discursive' history of early Japanese cinema, that avoids approaching it simply as an alternative to western cinema and reveals the unique role cinema played in the formulation of modern Japanese culture. Gerow makes clear the foundations of Japanese film history in the silent era--and how it shaped the complex and exciting national cinema that followed."--Tom Gunning, author of D.W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film

The Arts of Cinema

Author: Martin Seel

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 180

View: 672

"Explores film's connections to the other arts and the qualities that distinguish it from them. He explores the cinema's singular aesthetic potential and uses specific examples from a diverse range of films--from Antonioni and Hitchcock to The Searchers and The Bourne Supremacy--to demonstrate the many ways this potential can be realized"--

Promises of Empowerment

Women in Asia and Latin America

Author: Jennifer L. Troutner

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 292

View: 458

How and to what degree are women worldwide gaining and using power? This book offers the first genuinely comparative assessment of this key question by exploring the conditions, actions, and accomplishments of women in Latin America and Asia. Encompassing 60 percent of the world's population and experiencing far-reaching transformations, these two regions offer a vital window into our understanding of the experiences of women globally. Revealing both basic similarities and fundamental differences, this volume offers thoughtful insights about the changing conditions of women, on the one hand, and, on the other, about patterns of social change throughout Asia and Latin America.

The Cinema of the Dardenne Brothers

Responsible Realism

Author: Philip Mosley

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 638

The brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne have established an international reputation for their emotionally powerful realist cinema. Inspired by their home turf of Liège-Seraing, a former industrial hub of French-speaking southern Belgium, they have crafted a series of fiction films that blends acute observation of life on the social margins with moral fables for the postmodern age. This volume analyses the brothers' career from their leftist video documentaries of the 1970s and 1980s through their debut as directors of fiction films in the late 1980s and early 1990s to their six major achievements from The Promise (1996) to The Kid with a Bike (2011), an oeuvre that includes two Golden Palms at the Cannes film festival, for Rosetta (1999) and The Child (2005). It argues that the ethical dimension of the Dardennes' work complements rather than precludes their sustained expression of a fundamental political sensibility.

The Promise of the Metropolis

Bangalore's Twentieth Century

Author: Janaki Nair

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 423

This volume provides a comprehensive perspective on the city of Bangalore that relates to three levels of analysis, that of the conceived city, the perceived city and spatial practice. The book also charts the styles and forms of contemporary urban democracy and the city as the site of a continuous redefinition of Indian citizenship.

The Utopia of Film

Cinema and Its Futures in Godard, Kluge, and Tahimik

Author: Christopher Pavsek

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 868

The German filmmaker Alexander Kluge has long promoted cinema's relationship with the goals of human emancipation. Jean-Luc Godard and Filipino director Kidlat Tahimik also believe in cinema's ability to bring about what Theodor W. Adorno once called a "redeemed world." Situating the films of Godard, Tahimik, and Kluge within debates over social revolution, utopian ideals, and the unrealized potential of utopian thought and action, Christopher Pavsek showcases the strengths, weaknesses, and undeniable impact of their utopian visions on film's political evolution. He discusses Godard's Alphaville (1965) against Germany Year 90 Nine-Zero (1991) and JLG/JLG: Self-portrait in December (1994), and he conducts the first scholarly reading of Film Socialisme (2010). He considers Tahimik's virtually unknown masterpiece, I Am Furious Yellow (1981–1991), along with Perfumed Nightmare (1977) and Turumba (1983); and he constructs a dialogue between Kluge's Brutality in Stone (1961) and Yesterday Girl (1965) and his later The Assault of the Present on the Rest of Time (1985) and Fruits of Trust (2009).

The Promise of Air

Author: Algernon Blackwood

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 171

View: 514

Blackwood was born in Shooter's Hill (today part of south-east London, but then part of northwest Kent) and educated at Wellington College. His father was a Post Office administrator who, according to Peter Penzoldt, "though not devoid of genuine good-heartedness, had appallingly narrow religious ideas".Blackwood had a varied career, farming in Canada, operating a hotel, as a newspaper reporter in New York City, and, throughout his adult life, an occasional essayist for various periodicals. In his late thirties, he moved back to England and started to write stories of the supernatural. He was very successful, writing at least ten original collections of short stories and eventually appearing on both radio and television to tell them. He also wrote fourteen novels, several children's books, and a number of plays, most of which were produced but not published. He was an avid lover of nature and the outdoors, and many of his stories reflect this. English writer of ghost stories and supernatural fiction, of whom Lovecraft wrote: "He is the one absolute and unquestioned master of weird atmosphere." His powerful story "The Willows," which effectively describes another dimension impinging upon our own, was reckoned by Lovecraft to be not only "foremost of all" Blackwood's tales but the best "weird tale" of all time. (Unfortunately, Blackwood, who was familiar with Lovecraft's work, failed to return the compliment. As he told Peter Penzoldt, he found "spiritual terror" missing in his young admirer's writing, something he considered all-important in his own.) Among his thirty-odd books, Blackwood wrote a series of stories and short novels published as John Silence, Physician Extraordinary (1908), which featured a "psychic detective" who combined the skills of a Sherlock Holmes and a psychic medium. Blackwood also wrote light fantasy and juvenile books. The son of a preacher, Blackwood had a life-long interest in the supernatural, the occult, and spiritualism, and firmly believed that humans possess latent psychic powers. The autobiography Episodes Before Thirty (1923) tells of his lean years as a journalist in New York. In the late 1940s, Blackwood had a television program on the BBC on which he read . . . ghost stories!

The promise of photography

the DG Bank collection

Author: Luminita Sabau

Publisher: Prestel Pub

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 388

View: 707

Udgivet i anledning af udstilling på fem forskellige museer i 1998/1999.