The Problems of Jurisprudence

Author: Richard A. Posner

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 485

View: 317

In this book, Richard A. Posner examines how judges go about making difficult decisions. Posner argues that they cannot rely on either logic or science, but must fall back on a grab bag of informal methods of reasoning that owe less than one might think to legal training and experience. -- Adapted from Amazon.com summary.

The Province of Jurisprudence Determined

And, The Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence

Author: John Austin

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 396

View: 436

This edition comprises Austin's best known works; "The Province of Jurisprudence Determined," a classic work of moral, legal and political philosophy, and "The Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence" which gives an assesment of Austin's views of analyitical jurisprudence.

Philosophy of Law

Classic and Contemporary Readings

Author: Larry May

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 648

View: 960

Philosophy of Law provides a rich overview of the diverse theoretical justifications for our legal rules, systems, and practices. Utilizes the work of both classical and contemporary philosophers to illuminate the relationship between law and morality Introduces students to the philosophical underpinnings of International Law and its increasing importance as we face globalization Features concrete examples in the form of cases significant to the evolution of law Contrasts Anglo-American law with foreign institutions and practices such as those in China, Japan, India, Ireland and Canada Incorporates diverse perspectives on the philosophy of law ranging from canonical material to feminist theory, critical theory, postmodernism, and critical race theory

There's No Such Thing As Free Speech

And It's a Good Thing, Too

Author: Stanley Fish

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 911

In an era when much of what passes for debate is merely moral posturing--traditional family values versus the cultural elite, free speech versus censorship--or reflexive name-calling--the terms "liberal" and "politically correct," are used with as much dismissive scorn by the right as "reactionary" and "fascist" are by the left--Stanley Fish would seem an unlikely lightning rod for controversy. A renowned scholar of Milton, head of the English Department of Duke University, Fish has emerged as a brilliantly original critic of the culture at large, praised and pilloried as a vigorous debunker of the pieties of both the left and right. His mission is not to win the cultural wars that preoccupy the nation's attention, but rather to redefine the terms of battle. In There's No Such Thing as Free Speech, Fish takes aim at the ideological gridlock paralyzing academic and political exchange in the nineties. In his witty, accessible dissections of the swirling controversies over multiculturalism, affirmative action, canon revision, hate speech, and legal reform, he neatly eviscerates both the conservatives' claim to possession of timeless, transcendent values (the timeless transcendence of which they themselves have conveniently identified), and the intellectual left's icons of equality, tolerance, and non-discrimination. He argues that while conservative ideologues and liberal stalwarts might disagree vehemently on what is essential to a culture, or to a curriculum, both mistakenly believe that what is essential can be identified apart from the accidental circumstances (of time and history) to which the essential is ritually opposed. In the book's first section, which includes the five essays written for Fish's celebrated debates with Dinesh D'Souza (the author and former Reagan White House policy analyst), Fish turns his attention to the neoconservative backlash. In his introduction, Fish writes, "Terms that come to us wearing the label 'apolitical'--'common values', 'fairness', 'merit', 'color blind', 'free speech', 'reason'--are in fact the ideologically charged constructions of a decidedly political agenda. I make the point not in order to level an accusation, but to remove the sting of accusation from the world 'politics' and redefine it as a synonym for what everyone inevitably does." Fish maintains that the debate over political correctness is an artificial one, because it is simply not possible for any party or individual to occupy a position above or beyond politics. Regarding the controversy over the revision of the college curriculum, Fish argues that the point is not to try to insist that inclusion of ethnic and gender studies is not a political decision, but "to point out that any alternative curriculum--say a diet of exclusively Western or European texts--would be no less politically invested." In Part Two, Fish follows the implications of his arguments to a surprising rejection of the optimistic claims of the intellectual left that awareness of the historical roots of our beliefs and biases can allow us, as individuals or as a society, to escape or transcend them. Specifically, he turns to the movement for reform of legal studies, and insists that a dream of a legal culture in which no one's values are slighted or declared peripheral can no more be realized than the dream of a concept of fairness that answers to everyone's notions of equality and jsutice, or a yardstick of merit that is true to everyone's notions of worth and substance. Similarly, he argues that attempts to politicize the study of literature are ultimately misguided, because recharacterizations of literary works have absolutely no impact on the mainstream of political life. He concludes his critique of the academy with "The Unbearable Ugliness of Volvos," an extraordinary look at some of the more puzzing, if not out-and-out masochistic, characteristics of a life in academia. Penetrating, fearless, and brilliantly argued, There's No Such Thing as Free Speech captures the essential Fish. It is must reading for anyone who cares about the outcome of America's cultural wars.

Human Rights and Judicial Review

A Comparative Perspective

Author: David M. Beatty

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 361

View: 602

"Human Rights and Judicial Review: A Comparative Perspective" collects, in one volume, a basic description of the most important principles and methods of analysis followed by the major Courts enforcing constitutional Bills of Rights around the world. The Courts include the Supreme Courts of Japan, India, Canada and the United States, the Constitutional Courts of Germany and Italy and the European Court of Human Rights. Each chapter is devoted to an analysis of the substantive jurisprudence developed by these Courts to determine whether a challenged law is constitutional or not, and is written by members of these Courts who have had a prior academic career. The book highlights the similarities and differences in the analytical methods used by these courts in determining whether or not someone's constitutional rights have been violated. Students and scholars of constitutional law and human rights, judges and advocates engaged in constitutional litigation will find the book a unique and valuable resource.

Pragmatism

Author: Russell B. Goodman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Pragmatism

Page:

View: 258

Jurisprudence

The Philosophy and Method of the Law

Author: Edgar Bodenheimer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 463

View: 211

Discusses the nature and functions and philosophical foundations of law as well as the central problems of legal method

Law and Market Economy

Reinterpreting the Values of Law and Economics

Author: Robin Paul Malloy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 179

View: 791

Law, market theory and semiotics together provide a challenging new perspective on economic analysis of law.

Postmodern Legal Movements

Law and Jurisprudence At Century's End

Author: Gary Minda

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 362

View: 122

What do Catharine MacKinnon, the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education, and Lani Guinier have in common? All have, in recent years, become flashpoints for different approaches to legal reform. In the last quarter century, the study and practice of law have been profoundly influenced by a number of powerful new movements; academics and activists alike are rethinking the interaction between law and society, focusing more on the tangible effects of law on human lives than on its procedural elements. In this wide-ranging and comprehensive volume, Gary Minda surveys the current state of legal scholarship and activism, providing an indispensable guide to the evolution of law in America.

The Rule of Law

Author: Ian Shapiro

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 396

View: 432

From the sprawling remnants of the Soviet empire to the southern tip of Africa, attempts are underway to replace arbitrary political regimes with governments constrained by the rule of law. This ideal which subordinates the wills of individuals, social movements--and even, sometimes, democratically elected majorities--to the requirements of law, is here explored by leading legal and political thinkers. Part I of The Rule of Law examines the interplay of democracy and the rule of law, while Part II focusses on the centuries-old debate about the meaning of the rule of law itself. Part III takes up the constraints that rationality exercises on the rule of law. If the rule of law is desirable partly because it is rational, then departures from that rule might also be desirable in the event that they can be shown to be rational. Part IV concentrates on the limits of the rule of law, considering the tensions between liberalism and the rule of law which exist despite the fact that reasoned commitment to the rule of the law is preeminently a liberal commitment. Contributing to the volume are: Robert A. Burt (Yale University), Steven J. Burton (University of Iowa), William N. Eskridge, Jr. (Georgetown University), John Ferejohn (Stanford University), Richard Flathman (Johns Hopkins University), Gerald F. Gaus (University of Minnesota, Duluth), Jean Hampton (University of Arizona), Russell Hardin (University of Chicago), James Johnson (University of Rochester), Jack Knight (Washington University), Stephen Macedo (Harvard University), David Schmidtz (Yale University), Lawrence B. Solum (Loyola Marymount University), Michael Walzer (Princeton University), Catherine Valcke (University of Toronto), and Michael P. Zuckert (Carleton College).

Deleuze and Law

Author: Laurent de Sutter

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 967

This collection of 13 essays offers insights into Gilles Deleuze's philosophy of law which experiments with new forms of politics, economics and society.

Law, Institution and Legal Politics

Fundamental Problems of Legal Theory and Social Philosophy

Author: Ota Weinberger

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 276

View: 607

It gives me great pleasure to offer this foreword to the present work of my admired friend and respected colleague Ota Weinberger. Apart from the essays of his which were published in our joint work An Institutional Theory of Law: New Approaches to Legal Positivism in 1986, relatively little of Wein berger's work is available in English. This is the more to be regretted, since his is work of particular interest to jurists of the English-speaking world both in view of its origins and in respect of its content As to its origins, Weinberger war reared as a student of the Pure Theory of Law, a theory which in its Kelsenian form has aroused very great interest and has had considerable influence among anglophoone scholars -perhaps even more than in the Germanic countries. Less well known is the fact that the Pure Theory itself divided into two schools, that of Vienna and that of Brno. It was in the Brno school of Frantisek Weyr that Weinberger's legal theory found its early formation, and perhaps from that early influence one can trace his continuing insistence on the dual character of legal norms -both as genuinely normative and yet at the same time having real social existence.

Cyberlaw

Problems of Policy and Jurisprudence in the Information Age

Author: Patricia L. Bellia

Publisher: West Group

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 740

View: 613

This law school casebook starts from the premise that cyberlaw is not simply a set of legal rules governing online interaction, but a lens through which broader issues can be re-examined. The book goes beyond simply plugging Internet-related cases into a series of pre-existing categories, instead emphasizing conceptual debates that cut across the areas of doctrine touched by cyberspace. It also uses the rise of the Internet to encourage readers to reconsider various assumptions in traditional legal doctrine, providing training in Internet-related legal issues while making the argument that cyberlaw is a coherent and useful field of study.

McCoubrey & White's Textbook on Jurisprudence

Author: James Penner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 279

View: 959

Fully updated and revised by James Penner and Emmanuel Melissaris, McCoubrey & White's Textbook on Jurisprudence clearly breaks down the complexities of this often daunting yet fascinating subject. Sophisticated ideas are explained concisely and with clarity, ensuring the reader is aware of the subtleties of the subject yet not overwhelmed. With chapters dedicated to both key concepts and leading theorists, this text takes a wide-ranging look at jurisprudence and places central ideas in context. In particular this text centres around one of the leading theorists, H.L.A Hart, and considers the landscape of jurisprudence in relation to his seminal The Concept of Law, looking at the key ideas which influenced him and considering the response to his work. Coverage of post-modern and feminist legal theory is also included, alongside discussion of key theorists such as Hobbes, Kant, and Rawls. Logically organised to support the topics commonly taught on jurisprudence and legal theory courses, this text provides an easy-to-follow and digestible account of this wide-ranging subject, making it the ideal companion text for further reading and research throughout your course.

Patterns of American Jurisprudence

Author: Neil Duxbury

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 530

View: 399

This unique study offers a comprehensive analysis of American jurisprudence from its emergence in the later stages of the nineteenth century through to the present day. The author argues that it is a mistake to view American jurisprudence as a collection of movements and schools which have emerged in opposition to each other. By offering a highly original analysis of legal formalism, legal realism, policy science, process jurisprudence, law and economics, and critical legal studies, he demonstrates that American jurisprudence has evolved as a collection of themes which reflect broader American intellectual and cultural concerns.

Analysis of Dis/agreement - with particular reference to Law and Legal Theory

Author: S. Eng

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 610

View: 576

In order to determine whether two participants in a discussion are in real dis/agreement, one must compare their propositions. Comparison presupposes yardsticks in common. Analysis of Dis/agreement thematises such yardsticks, in that it demonstrates the existence, content and factual significance of a relatively well-delimited set of proposition types and proposition patterns, with their accompanying tenability criteria and motivating interests. The book is a work in the field of legal theory by virtue of its demonstrating how lawyers' power of judgement is constituted in and through these yardsticks. The book is interdisciplinary by virtue of its demonstrating how the same yardsticks come into play more generally in argumentation formulated in everyday language, i.e. independently of law. And the book is a work in the field of philosophy by virtue of its demonstrating the existence and factual significance of language and argumentation actions with a certain independence in relation to the level of controversial fundamental philosophical positions.

Bibliography of Law and Economics

Author: B. Bouckaert

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 667

View: 172

Law and economics can be considered as the most exciting development in legal scholarship in recent decades. This volume is the first all-encompassing bibliography in this area. It lists approximately 7000 publications, covering the whole area of law and economics, including `old' law and economics (topics such as antitrust law, labor law, tax law, social security, economic regulation, etc.) as well as `new' law and economics with such topics as tort law, contract law, family law, procedure, criminal law, etc.). The volume also includes the literature on the philosophical foundations and the fundamental concepts of the approach. Part Two gives a special survey of law and economics publications in Europe, written in other languages than English. The Bibliography of Law and Economics is an invaluable reference work for students, scholars, lawyers, economists and other people interested in this field.