The Perils of Certain English Prisoners

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 61

View: 896

In 1857, Charles Dickens paired up with his close friend and fellow Victorian novelist Wilkie Collins to produce this interesting novella. Said to have been inspired by the Sepoy Mutiny of that year, the tale scrutinizes the moral impact of colonialism and lauds the bravery of a regiment of Marines tasked with the responsibility of protecting a community of British expats from an encroaching swarm of dangerous pirates.

Perils Of Certain English Prisoners

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 52

View: 217

We contrived to keep afloat all that night, and, the stream running strong with us, to glide a long way down the river. But, we found the night to be a dangerous time for such navigation, on account of the eddies and rapids, and it was therefore settled next day that in future we would bring-to at sunset, and encamp on the shore.

Charles Dickens' Perils of Certain English Prisoners

To a Young Heart Everything Is Fun.

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Word to the Wise

ISBN:

Category: English fiction

Page: 52

View: 232

Perils of Certain English Prisoners is a novella published by the Victorian novelist Charles Dickens in 1857 in collaboration with his close friend, the novelist Wilkie Collins. Of the novella's three chapters, Collins wrote the second, "The Prison in the Woods." The story is set in Asia and central America and deals with the theme of British Imperialism. Critics agree that Dickens was inspired by the Indian rebellion against British colonists that took place the same year of the book's publication. Unlike the other British literary figure and politician Benjamin Disraeli, Dickens did not side with the rebels and considered their action to be illicit. In the fiction, Dickens tells about a silver-mine island situated in a far-off British colony called Belize which has been seized by a gang of pirates. The latter terrorize the British, imprison them, and even murder some of them. However, thanks to the remarkable intelligence and bravery of British women, the captives eventually manage to escape. By the end of the narrative, the pirates are vanquished by the British in what appears to be an indirect homily on the consequences of any rebellious action against the Crown.

A Tale of Two Cities

Miscellaneous: The Perils of Certain English Prisoners ; The Wreck of the Golden Mary ; The Begging-letter Writer

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: France

Page: 512

View: 687

Deciphering Race

White Anxiety, Racial Conflict, and the Turn to Fiction in Mid-Victorian English Prose

Author: Laura Callanan

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 185

View: 405

Anxieties of Empire and the Fiction of Intrigue

Author: Yumna Siddiqi

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 248

Focusing on late nineteenth- and twentieth-century stories of detection, policing, and espionage by British and South Asian writers, Yumna Siddiqi presents an original and compelling exploration of the cultural anxieties created by imperialism. She suggests that while colonial writers use narratives of intrigue to endorse imperial rule, postcolonial writers turn the generic conventions and topography of the fiction of intrigue on its head, launching a critique of imperial power that makes the repressive and emancipatory impulses of postcolonial modernity visible. Siddiqi devotes the first part of her book to the colonial fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle and John Buchan, in which the British regime's preoccupation with maintaining power found its voice. The rationalization of difference, pronouncedly expressed through the genre's strategies of representation and narrative resolution, helped to reinforce domination and, in some cases, allay fears concerning the loss of colonial power. In the second part, Siddiqi argues that late twentieth-century South Asian writers also underscore the state's insecurities, but unlike British imperial writers, they take a critical view of the state's authoritarian tendencies. Such writers as Amitav Ghosh, Michael Ondaatje, Arundhati Roy, and Salman Rushdie use the conventions of detective and spy fiction in creative ways to explore the coercive actions of the postcolonial state and the power dynamics of a postcolonial New Empire. Drawing on the work of leading theorists of imperialism such as Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, and the Subaltern Studies historians, Siddiqi reveals how British writers express the anxious workings of a will to maintain imperial power in their writing. She also illuminates the ways South Asian writers portray the paradoxes of postcolonial modernity and trace the ruses and uses of reason in a world where the modern marks a horizon not only of hope but also of economic, military, and ecological disaster.

Dickens' Christmas Stories (20 original stories as published between the years 1850 and 1867 in collaboration with Wilkie Collins and others in Dickens' own Magazines)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 131

View: 654

This carefully crafted ebook: "Dickens' Christmas Stories (20 original stories as published between the years 1850 and 1867 in collaboration with Wilkie Collins and others in Dickens' own Magazines)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Not to be confused with Dicken's well known Christmas Tales (A Christmas Carol; The Chimes; The Cricket on the Hearth; The Battle of Life; The Haunted Man) this eBook presents a collection of 20 short stories, published in the Christmas edition of Dickens' weekly magazines "Household Words" and its successor, "All the Year Round", between the years 1850 and 1867. Charles Dickens was the publisher and editor of, and a major contributor to these magazines. He often invited other authors to contribute with stories or to write stories in collaboration with himself. Content: - A Christmas Tree - What Christmas Is As We Grow Older - The Poor Relation's Story - The Child's Story - The Schoolboy's Story - Nobody's Story - The Seven Poor Travellers - The Holly-Tree - The Wreck of the Golden Mary - The Perils of Certain English Prisoners - Going Into Society - The Haunted House - A Message From the Sea - Tom Tiddle's Ground - Somebody's Luggage - Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgings - Mrs. Lirriper's Legacy - Doctor Marigold - Mugby Junction - No Thoroughfare