The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe

Author: Daniel Goffman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 817

This text provides an introduction to the history and institutions of the Ottoman Empire and presents a claim for its inclusion in Europe, as opposed to being apart from it due to its many cultural differences.

The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922

Author: Donald Quataert

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 760

Second edition of an authoritative text on the Ottoman Empire.

New Approaches to State and Peasant in Ottoman History

Author: Halil Berktay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 274

View: 371

Debates on the world historical place of the Ottoman Empire in the last few decades have been conducted mainly in Turkey, but increasingly concepts have been introduced into the conversation from the study of European, Chinese and Central Asian history. This book, first published in 1992, examines the nature of the Ottoman state from a variety of perspectives, economic, political and social.

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Author: Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 446

This fourth edition of Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks's prize-winning survey features significant changes to every chapter, designed to reflect the newest scholarship. Global issues have been threaded throughout the book, while still preserving the clear thematic structure of previous editions. Thus readers will find expanded discussions of gendered racial hierarchies, migration, missionaries, and consumer goods. In addition, there is enhanced coverage of recent theoretical directions; the ideas, beliefs, and practices of ordinary people; early industrialization; women's learning, letter writing, and artistic activities; emotions and sentiments; single women and same-sex relations; masculinities; mixed-race and enslaved women; and the life course from birth to death. With geographically broad coverage, including Russia, Scandinavia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Iberian Peninsula, this remains the leading text on women and gender in Europe in this period. Accompanying this essential reading is a completely revised website featuring extensive updated bibliographies, web links, and primary source material.

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Author: Merry E. Wiesner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 812

This new edition of Merry Wiesner-Hanks' prize-winning book incorporates the newest scholarship and features a new chapter on gender and race in the colonial world; expanded coverage of eighteenth century developments including the Enlightenment; and enhanced discussions of masculinity, single women, same-sex relations, humanism, and women's religious roles.

Ottoman Wars, 1700-1870

An Empire Besieged

Author: Virginia Aksan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 585

The Ottoman Empire had reached the peak of its power, presenting a very real threat to Western Christendom when in 1683 it suffered its first major defeat, at the Siege of Vienna. Tracing the empire’s conflicts of the next two centuries, The Ottoman Wars: An Empire Besieged examines the social transformation of the Ottoman military system in an era of global imperialism Spanning more than a century of conflict, the book considers challenges the Ottoman government faced from both neighbouring Catholic Habsburg Austria and Orthodox Romanov Russia, as well as - arguably more importantly – from military, intellectual and religious groups within the empire. Using close analysis of select campaigns, Virginia Aksan first discusses the Ottoman Empire’s changing internal military context, before addressing the modernized regimental organisation under Sultan Mahmud II after 1826. Featuring illustrations and maps, many of which have never been published before, The Ottoman Wars draws on previously untapped source material to provide an original and compelling account of an empire near financial and societal collapse, and the successes and failures of a military system under siege. The book is a fascinating study of the decline of an international power, raising questions about the influence of culture on warfare.

Possible Lives

Authors and Saints in Renaissance Italy

Author: Alison Knowles Frazier

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 544

View: 118

Possible Lives uses the saints'lives written by humanists of the Italian Renaissance to explore the intertwining of classical and religious cultures on the eve of the European Reformation. The lives of saints were among the most reproduced and widely distributed literatures of medieval and early modern Europe. During the century before the Reformation, these narratives of impossible goodness fell into the hands of classicizing intellectuals known as humanists. This study examines how the humanist authors received, criticized, and rewrote the traditional stories of exemplary virtue for patrons and audiences who were surprisingly open to their textual experiments. Drawn from a newly constructed catalog of primary sources in manuscript and print, the cases in this book range from the lure of martyrdom as the West confronted Islam to the use of saints'lives in local politics and the rhetorician's classroom. Frazier discusses the writers'perceptions of historical sanctity, the commanding place of the mendicant friars, and one unique account of a contemporary holy woman. Possible Lives shows that the classical Renaissance was also a saintly Renaissance, as humanists deployed their rhetorical and philological skills to "renew the persuasive force of Christian virtue" and "save the cult of the saints." Combining quantitative and anecdotal approaches in a highly readable series of case studies, Frazier reveals the contextual richness of this little-known and unexpectedly large body of Latin hagiography.

Constitutional Developments Of Turkey Since Ottoman Times To The Present State Of The Modern Turkish Republic

Author: Mehmet Merdan Hekimoglu

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 48

View: 619

Research Paper (postgraduate) from the year 2010 in the subject Law - Public Law / Miscellaneous, , language: English, abstract: This Study concerns itself with the Turkish constitutional developments from Ottoman times to the present state of the modern Turkish Republic.In this way, the historical constitutional experience of the Turkish society will be presented compactly. To this end, first a general overview of Turkish history of law is to be given. The constitutional developments are hereby pointed out from the Ottoman State to the today's Turkish Republic, whereby the respective constitution laws are presented content together. A comparative method will be pursued at this point. Then an introduction is given into the Turkish constitutional amendments in the frame of the EU full membership of Turkey whereby the meaning of these constitutional amendments is shown under the 1982 Constitution of Turkey. Finally, it will be shown that the Turkish people can entirely make a new constitution with only their own natural inner dynamics. The Turkish society, with its rich constitutional experience and its advanced level of development is in a position to do so easily.

The Military Revolution in Early Modern Europe

A Revision

Author: Frank Jacob

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 101

View: 333

This book challenges the premise that a ‘military revolution’ prompted the major European powers to enter into an era of global hegemony during the early modern period, and suggests that this theory is not supported if we closely examine contemporary historical events. The conquests of Mexico and Peru, arguably the two most important colonial acquisitions by a European power during that era, were accomplished without the technology or tactics that are usually associated with the ‘military revolution’. On the other hand, Japan, Korea, some Indian states and the Ottoman Empire implemented military reforms, both tactical and technological, that are commonly associated with what was considered an exclusively Western approach to warfare. By comparing case studies of the Western and the non-Western world, Frank Jacob and Gilmar Visoni-Alonzo show that the concept of such a ‘military revolution’ is a myth perpetuated by a Eurocentric perspective on history.