The Only Language They Understand

Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine

Author: Nathan Thrall

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 623

In a myth-busting analysis of the world's most intractable conflict, a star of Middle East reporting, "one of the most important writers" in the field (The New York Times), argues that only one weapon has yielded progress: force. Scattered over the territory between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea lie the remnants of failed peace proposals, international summits, secret negotiations, UN resolutions, and state-building efforts. The conventional story is that these well-meaning attempts at peacemaking were repeatedly, perhaps terminally, thwarted by violence. Through a rich interweaving of reportage, historical narrative, and powerful analysis, Nathan Thrall presents a startling counter-history. He shows that force—including but not limited to violence—has impelled each side to make its largest concessions, from Palestinian acceptance of a two-state solution to Israeli territorial withdrawals. This simple fact has been neglected by the world powers, which have expended countless resources on initiatives meant to diminish friction between the parties. By quashing any hint of confrontation, promising an imminent negotiated solution, facilitating security cooperation, developing the institutions of a still unborn Palestinian state, and providing bounteous economic and military assistance, the United States and Europe have merely entrenched the conflict by lessening the incentives to end it. Thrall’s important book upends the beliefs steering these failed policies, revealing how the aversion of pain, not the promise of peace, has driven compromise for Israelis and Palestinians alike. Published as Israel's occupation of East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza reaches its fiftieth anniversary, which is also the centenary of the Balfour Declaration that first promised a Jewish national home in Palestine, The Only Language They Understand advances a bold thesis that shatters ingrained positions of both left and right and provides a new and eye-opening understanding of this most vexed of lands.

November 1916: A Novel

The Red Wheel II

Author: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1040

View: 977

The month of November 1916 in Russia was outwardly unmarked by seismic events, but beneath the surface, society seethed fiercely. In Petrograd, luxury-store windows are still brightly lit; the Duma debates the monarchy, the course of war, and clashing paths to reform; the workers in the miserable munitions factories veer increasingly toward sedition. At the front all is stalemate except for sudden death's capricious visits, while in the countryside sullen anxiety among hard-pressed farmers is rapidly replacing patriotism. In Zurich, Lenin, with the smallest of all revolutionary groups, plots his sinister logistical miracle. With masterly and moving empathy, through the eyes of both historical and fictional protagonists, Solzhenitsyn unforgettably transports us to that time and place--the last of pre-Soviet Russia. Translated by H.T. Willetts. November 1916 is the second volume in Solzhenitsyn's multi-part work, the Red Wheel, following August 1914. The final volumes will deal with March and April of 1917. Each volume concentrates on a historical turning point, or "knot," as the wheel rolls on inexorably toward revolution.

PRAYERS OF WAR

Author: Ed Citronnelli

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 236

View: 868

The Holy Spirit has moved my spirit to write this book on warfare prayers. These prayers dal with overthrowing the powers of demon spirits, both principalities and powers and even Lucifer himself. They're effective against breaking curses and satanic manipulation over your life, house, marriage, children, finances, ministry, church, business, health and they stop demons from hindering and blocking your future. They are effective also inde aling with getting the dark areas out of your life so that you will be used of god and fulfill your predestinated purpose.

The Al-Qaeda Doctrine

The Framing and Evolution of the Leadership's Public Discourse

Author: Donald Holbrook

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 132

Ever since it was first established, the senior leadership of Al-Qaeda has sought to communicate its core values, rationalizations, and principles to the world. Altogether, these statements convey Al-Qaeda's doctrine and the beliefs for which the leadership claims to be fighting. This volume in the New Directions in Terrorism Studies series analyzes over 250 statements made by the organization's two key leaders, Ayman Al-Zawahiri and Usama Bin Ladin, over the last two decades. It provides an in-depth and systematic analysis of these communications, showing which key issues emphasized by the two leaders evolved over time and highlighting their core principles. It explore Al-Qaeda's problem diagnosis, the solutions offered by its two leaders, their escalating --although often contradictory-- approach towards violence, and their chosen communication strategy for different types of audiences. The book shows how Al-Qaeda's leadership began to develop an increasingly critical approach towards Islam in the wake of the 9/11 attacks and discusses tensions that may undermine the resilience of its doctrine. This unique evidence-based analysis of Al-Qaeda will attract academics specializing in terrorism and counterterrorism as well as the policy community.

Dissent from the Homeland

Essays after September 11

Author: Stanley Hauerwas

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 739

Dissent from the Homeland is a book about patriotism, justice, revenge, American history and symbology, art and terror, and pacifism. In this deliberately and urgently provocative collection, noted writers, philosophers, literary critics, and theologians speak out against the war on terrorism and the government of George W. Bush as a response to the events of September 11, 2001. Critiquing government policy, citizen apathy, and societal justifications following the attacks, these writers present a wide range of opinions on such issues as contemporary American foreign policy and displays of patriotism in the wake of the disaster. Whether illuminating the narratives that have been used to legitimate the war on terror, reflecting on the power of American consumer culture to transform the attack sites into patriotic tourist attractions, or insisting that to be a Christian is to be a pacifist, these essays refuse easy answers. They consider why the Middle East harbors a deep-seated hatred for the United States. They argue that the U.S. drive to win the cold war made the nation more like its enemies, leading the government to support ruthless anti-Communist tyrants such as Mobutu, Suharto, and Pinochet. They urge Americans away from the pitfall of national self-righteousness toward an active peaceableness—an alert, informed, practiced state of being—deeply contrary to both passivity and war. Above all, the essays assembled in Dissent from the Homeland are a powerful entreaty for thought, analysis, and understanding. Originally published as a special issue of the journal South Atlantic Quarterly, Dissent from the Homeland has been expanded to include new essays as well as a new introduction and postscript. Contributors. Srinivas Aravamudan, Michael J. Baxter, Jean Baudrillard, Robert N. Bellah, Daniel Berrigan, Wendell Berry, Vincent J. Cornell, David James Duncan, Stanley Hauerwas, Fredric Jameson, Frank Lentricchia, Catherine Lutz, Jody McAuliffe, John Milbank, Peter Ochs, Donald E. Pease, Anne R. Slifkin, Rowan Williams, Susan Willis, Slavoj Zizek

Dictators at War and Peace

Author: Jessica L. P. Weeks

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 531

Why do some autocratic leaders pursue aggressive or expansionist foreign policies, while others are much more cautious in their use of military force? The first book to focus systematically on the foreign policy of different types of authoritarian regimes, Dictators at War and Peace breaks new ground in our understanding of the international behavior of dictators. Jessica L. P. Weeks explains why certain kinds of regimes are less likely to resort to war than others, why some are more likely to win the wars they start, and why some authoritarian leaders face domestic punishment for foreign policy failures whereas others can weather all but the most serious military defeat. Using novel cross-national data, Weeks looks at various nondemocratic regimes, including those of Saddam Hussein and Joseph Stalin; the Argentine junta at the time of the Falklands War, the military government in Japan before and during World War II, and the North Vietnamese communist regime. She finds that the differences in the conflict behavior of distinct kinds of autocracies are as great as those between democracies and dictatorships. Indeed, some types of autocracies are no more belligerent or reckless than democracies, casting doubt on the common view that democracies are more selective about war than autocracies.

In the Throe of Wonder

Intimations of the Sacred in a Post-Modern World

Author: Jerome A. Miller

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 222

View: 938

This book is a meditation on the experiences of wonder, horror, and awe, and an exploration of their ontological import. It argues that these experiences are not, as our culture often presumes, merely subjective, emotive responses to events that happen in the world. Rather, they are transformative experiences that fracture our ordinary lives and, in so doing, provide us access to realities of which we would otherwise be oblivious. Wonder, horror, and awe, like the experiences of love and death to which they are so intimately related, are not events that happen in our world but events that happen to it and thus alter our life as a whole. Miller explores the impact of that transformation -- its deconstructive effect on our ordinary sense of our selves, and the breakthrough to a new understanding of being which it makes possible.

Swift Arrow

Author: Josephine Cunnington Edwards

Publisher: TEACH Services, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Frontier and pioneer life

Page: 110

View: 452

A large family migrated over from Europe in the early 1700's and settled in Pennsylvania. After some time one of the sons, Marcus Boylan, and his family decided to join others to travel and settle the frontier. Disaster struck when two young boys were stolen by Indians, one being Marcus' son George. This is a true account of his life with this Indian tribe, his eventual escape and journey back home.

1946: The Making of the Modern World

Author: Victor Sebestyen

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 279

With the end of the Second World War, a new world was born. The peace agreements that brought the conflict to an end implemented decisions that not only shaped the second half of the twentieth century, but continue to affect our world today and impact on its future. In 1946 the Cold War began, the state of Israel was conceived, the independence of India was all but confirmed and Chinese Communists gained a decisive upper hand in their fight for power. It was a pivotal year in modern history in which countries were reborn and created, national and ideological boundaries were redrawn and people across the globe began to rebuild their lives. In this remarkable history, the foreign correspondent and historian Victor Sebestyen draws on contemporary documents from around the world - including Stalin's personal notes from the Potsdam peace conference - to examine what lay behind the political decision-making. Sebestyen uses a vast array of archival material and personal testimonies to explore how the lives of generations of people across continents were shaped by the events of 1946. Taking readers from Berlin to London, from Paris to Moscow, from Washington to Jerusalem and from Delhi to Shanghai, this is a vivid and wide-ranging account of both powerbrokers and ordinary men and women from an acclaimed author.

The Legalist Reformation

Law, Politics, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980

Author: William E. Nelson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 627

Based on a detailed examination of New York case law, this pathbreaking book shows how law, politics, and ideology in the state changed in tandem between 1920 and 1980. Early twentieth-century New York was the scene of intense struggle between white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant upper and middle classes located primarily in the upstate region and the impoverished, mainly Jewish and Roman Catholic, immigrant underclass centered in New York City. Beginning in the 1920s, however, judges such as Benjamin N. Cardozo, Henry J. Friendly, Learned Hand, and Harlan Fiske Stone used law to facilitate the entry of the underclass into the economic and social mainstream and to promote tolerance among all New Yorkers. Ultimately, says William Nelson, a new legal ideology was created. By the late 1930s, New Yorkers had begun to reconceptualize social conflict not along class lines but in terms of the power of majorities and the rights of minorities. In the process, they constructed a new approach to law and politics. Though doctrinal change began to slow by the 1960s, the main ambitions of the legalist reformation--liberty, equality, human dignity, and entrepreneurial opportunity--remain the aspirations of nearly all Americans, and of much of the rest of the world, today.

A Place To Stand

Author: Stanley Middleton

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 250

View: 276

Noel's sister, Ethel, is dying, and for the first time since childhood, he spends a week in her company. As she drifts in and out of consciousness, he discovers more about her past, her fight for women's rights in education, and in the process reasses his own life. Buried in this past is a secret infatuation for a man who reappears in Ethel's story, and that of her daughter, in a most unexpected way.

The Pete Seeger Reader

Author: Ronald D. Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 368

View: 409

Perhaps the most widely recognized figure in folk music and one of the most well-known figures in American political activism, Pete Seeger now belongs among the icons of 20th-century American culture. The road to his current status as activist and respected voice of folk music was long and often rough, starting from the moment he dropped out of Harvard in the late 1930s and picked up a banjo. Editors Ronald Cohen and James Capaldi trace Seeger's long and storied career, focusing on his work as not only a singer, but also on his substantial contributions as an educator, songwriter, organizer, publisher, and journalist. The son of musicians, Seeger began his musical career before World War II and became well-known in the 1950s as a member of the commercially popular Weavers, only to be blacklisted by much of the mainstream media in the 1960s because of his progressive politics, and to return to the music scene in subsequent decades as a tireless educator and activist. The Pete Seeger Reader gathers writings from numerous sources, mixing Seeger's own work with that of the many people who have, over the years, written about him. Many of the pieces have never before been republished, and cover his entire career. A figure of amazing productivity, influence, and longevity, Seeger is author of a life that has been both cast in heroic terms and vilified. The selections in this book draw from a full range of these perspectives and will inform as they entertain, bringing into focus the life and contributions of one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century.

Arabian Jazz: A Novel

Author: Diana Abu-Jaber

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 181

"This oracular first novel, which unfurls like gossamer [has] characters of a depth seldom found in a debut."—The New Yorker In Diana Abu-Jaber's "impressive, entertaining" (Chicago Tribune) first novel, a small, poor-white community in upstate New York becomes home to the transplanted Jordanian family of Matussem Ramoud: his grown daughters, Jemorah and Melvina; his sister Fatima; and her husband, Zaeed. The widower Matuseem loves American jazz, kitschy lawn ornaments, and, of course, his daughters. Fatima is obsessed with seeing her nieces married—Jemorah is nearly thirty! Supernurse Melvina is firmly committed to her work, but Jemorah is ambivalent about her identity and role. Is she Arab? Is she American? Should she marry and, if so, whom? Winner of the Oregon Book Award and finalist for the National PEN/Hemingway Award, Arabian Jazz is "a joy to read.... You will be tempted to read passages out loud. And you should" (Boston Globe). USA Today praises Abu-Jaber's "gift for dialogue...her Arab-American rings musically, and hilariously, true."

Dog Handling

A Novel

Author: Clare Naylor

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 754

A hilarious and hip novel for every girl who’s been desperate to find a way into her dream-man’s heart–and discovered that love is more finicky than a Chihuahua in a Prada handbag. Yesterday, Liv Elliot had it all: a great flat in London’s Notting Hill, an actual career (okay, as an accountant), and a fiancé with whom she was only weeks away from wedded bliss. Every girl’s dream, right? But then Tim declared that the wedding was off–leaving Liv shell-shocked. Luckily, she’s got her best friend’s fab Australian beach house in which to recuperate. The restorative powers of the Sydney sun, sand, and sea soon have Liv feeling wonderfully careless, wanton, and reckless. Things really couldn’t get any more anti-accountant when she runs into old flame Ben Parker. It’s been years since they fooled around on their summer vacation, but Liv never forgot that genetically-blessed face. Raring to help her land beautiful Ben, Liv’s friends teach her the Rules of Dog Handling: Treat a man like a dog, and he’ll be eating out of your hand. But surely this can’t actually work? Liv is about to find out that it can–but she’s hardly prepared for the unexpected results.

Feminists Say the Darndest Things

A Politically Incorrect Professor Confronts "Womyn" on Campus

Author: Mike Adams

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 822

A hilarious romp by a popular conservative columnist The four most common words a feminist uses are "I," "me," "my," and "mine." Feminists are the only people who actually use these words more in adulthood than they did when they were two years old. Mike Adams-like P. J. O'Rourke and Christopher Buckley-understands that the best way to fight humorless liberals is to poke fun at them. And no liberal group is more humorless, or more in need of poking, than feminists on college campuses. It might seem like professional suicide for a conservative male professor to ridicule feminists for their antics on campus. But Adams does just that, with hilarious results. In Feminists Say the Darndest Things, he writes to feminists around the country with many thoughtful questions, such as: Why did they build a sex toy museum in the middle of a campus and then file sexual harassment charges against those who criticized their indiscretion? Why do they write "scholarly" articles like the one suggesting that deer hunters are simply acting out fantasies of raping underage women? And why, after his column said that feminists are intolerant of free speech, did they respond by trying to get him fired? When the author's pen pals take the bait, they do a better job of making feminism look silly than any critic ever could.

Island of Vice

Theodore Roosevelt's Quest to Clean Up Sin-Loving New York

Author: Richard Zacks

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 718

A ROLLICKING NARRATIVE HISTORY OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT'S EMBATTLED TENURE AS POLICE COMMISSIONER OF CORRUPT, PLEASURE-LOVING NEW YORK CITY IN THE 1880s, AND HIS DOOMED MISSION TO WIPE OUT VICE In the 1890s, New York City was America’s financial, manufacturing, and entertainment capital, and also its preferred destination for sin, teeming with 40,000 prostitutes, glittering casinos, and all-night dives packed onto the island’s two dozen square miles. Police captains took hefty bribes to see nothing while reformers writhed in frustration. In Island of Vice, bestselling author Richard Zacks paints a vivid picture of the lewd underbelly of 1890s New York, and of Theodore Roosevelt, the cocksure crusading police commissioner who resolved to clean up the bustling metropolis, where the silk top hats of Wall Street bobbed past teenage prostitutes trawling Broadway. Writing with great wit and zest, Zacks explores how Roosevelt went head-to-head with corrupt Tammany Hall, took midnight rambles with muckraker Jacob Riis, banned barroom drinking on Sundays, and tried to convince 2 million New Yorkers to enjoy wholesome family fun. In doing so, Teddy made a ruthless enemy of police captain “Big Bill” Devery, who grew up in the Irish slums and never tired of fighting “tin soldier” reformers. Roosevelt saw his mission as a battle of good versus evil; Devery saw prudery standing in the way of fun and profit. When righteous Roosevelt’s vice crackdown started to succeed all too well, many of his own supporters began to turn on him. Cynical newspapermen mocked his quixotic quest, his own political party abandoned him, and Roosevelt discovered that New York loves its sin more than its salvation. Zacks’s meticulous research and wonderful sense of narrative verve bring this disparate cast of both pious and bawdy New Yorkers to life. With cameos by Stephen Crane, J. P. Morgan, and Joseph Pulitzer, plus a horde of very angry cops, Island of Vice is an unforgettable portrait of turn-of-the-century New York in all its seedy glory, and a brilliant portrayal of the energetic, confident, and zealous Roosevelt, one of America’s most colorful public figures.

The Art of Not Having it All

True Stories of Men, Sex, and Other Disasters

Author: Melissa Kite

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 225

Melissa Kite's hilarious and honest memoir draws readers in to her exploits in not having it all in the world of leaning in—complete with dating misadventures, heroic plumbers, and clinically obese fish. Does a great weekend for you mean scrubbing all the grouting in your bathroom with a toothbrush? Do you fantasize about the handyman who in three days brought you more happiness than your useless ex-boyfriend did in three years? Do you write to-do lists that need paginating, and include items such as "re-mortgage house, get pregnant, climb Kilimanjaro"? Welcome to Melissa Kite's life and her uproarious, no-holds-barred memoir, The Art of Not Having it All, about the adventures of not having it all as a single lady in your prime. For a long time, Melissa had no idea there was anyone else out there remotely like her. Nearly every other woman she knew seemed to be valiantly juggling work and family life. By contrast, Melissa felt as though, in the fluttering mass of yellow Post-it notes on her fridge there was one that read, "Don't forget to get married and have kids," which had got covered in shopping lists, dry-cleaner receipts and trash collection schedules. If not having it all (the white picket fence, the kid, the job, the Mr. Right who helps you free your chubby angelfish who has wedged himself into a plastic log) means having just enough for you, then get ready to fall in love with your new best friend...

Masters of Battle

Monty, Patton and Rommel at War

Author: Terry Brighton

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 404

In the Second World War, Great Britain, the United States and Germany each produced one land force commander who stood out from the rest: Bernard Montgomery, George Patton and Erwin Rommel. These three armour-plated egos were the greatest generals of the war, and theirs was a very personal contest: the clash of mighty armies perceived as a bout between three men. All three were arrogant and flawed, yet with a genius for the command of men and an unrivalled enthusiasm for combat. All had spectacular success on the battlefield. But their explosive relationships with each other and with their political masters rivalled the pyrotechnics of their tank battles in determining the conduct and outcome of the war. Masters of Battle presents the Second World War as it was experienced by its three most flamboyant, controversial and influential commanders.

Rethinking School Violence

Theory, Gender, Context

Author: Kerry Robinson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 780

Taking a sociocultural approach to understanding violence, the authors in this collection examine how norms of gender, culture and educational practice contribute to school violence, providing strategies to intervene in and address violence in educational contexts.