The One I Knew the Best of All

A Memory of the Mind of a Child

Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page:

View: 417

The One I Knew Best of All (1893) is a memoir written by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The author covers her childhood and girlhood, taking the reader into confidence and depicting the delightful situations and circumstances of her youth. She starts her memoir with the Christmas holidays.

The One I Knew the Best of All (EasyRead Large Bold Edition)

Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 312

View: 222

The One I Knew Best of All (1893) is a memoir written by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The author covers her childhood and girlhood, taking the reader into confidence and depicting the delightful situations and circumstances of her youth. She starts her memoir with the Christmas holidays.

The One I Knew the Best of All, a Memory of the Mind of a Child. Illustrated by Reginald B. Birch

Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher: Hardpress Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 356

View: 918

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

The One I Knew Best of All

A Memory of the Mind of a Child

Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 346

View: 324

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The One I Knew the Best of All (Annotated)

Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 254

View: 161

When she was a teenager, author Frances Hodgson Burnett (Little Lord Fauntleroy, The Secret Garden) moved with her family from a comfortable existence in Manchester, England, to East Tennessee. It was 1865, and the scars of the American Civil War were still visible, particularly in Knoxville where the Hodgsons located. It was not an easy place for a teenage girl to be. But Frances made the best of it. As Jack Neely writes in the introduction: "It was an extreme shift for what had been an affluent middle-class big-city family to live in near-frontier conditions, without even enough income to feed themselves well. With a good measure of romanticism, Frances adapted. She had been a fan of the Leatherstocking Tales of James Fenimore Cooper, whose frontier adventures were as popular in England as in America. She saw elements of his famous settings in her new home." It was here, in the shadow of the Great Smoky Mountains, that Frances began her extraordinary writing career. And it was here that she returned, in her mind's vision, to write a remarkable and often overlooked autobiographical novel, The One I Knew the Best of All. The novel is a delightful account of a childhood, protected but full of good stories and small adventures. It is told from the child's point of view and describes the emotions of the Small Person -- as Frances coyly refers to herself -- as she encounters relatives, friends, adults who would take advantage of her and those who would befriend her. She meets the realities of death and loss and the joys of achievement and friendship. She develops a taste for reading, then for storytelling, and finally for writing. Those who want to know about Frances and how she began her long and wildly successful writing career need to read this book. Those who want insights about how a bright and innocent child sees the world and develops the wherewithal to face it should study this book. Those who simply want a good story -- one that your children could read or you could read to them -- should obtain this book and put it in an honored place in your library. Nothing else like it exists. This book is the first the Southern Appalachian Studies Editions, published by the Blount County Friends of the Library in Maryville, Tennessee. The purpose of the series is to bring out new editions of work by writers who have connections to East Tennessee.

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930

Author: Kate Flint

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 376

View: 547

Presents the iconic figure of the Native American in the British cultural imagination, examining how Native Americans regarded the British and how they challenged their cultural image in Britain. This title argues that native perspectives are essential to our understanding of transatlantic relations and the development of transnational modernity.

Racial Innocence

Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights

Author: Robin Bernstein

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 175

2013 Book Award Winner from the International Research Society in Children's Literature 2012 Outstanding Book Award Winner from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education 2012 Winner of the Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association 2012 Runner-Up, John Hope Franklin Publication Prize presented by the American Studies Association 2012 Honorable Mention, Distinguished Book Award presented by the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Part of the American Literatures Initiative Series Beginning in the mid nineteenth century in America, childhood became synonymous with innocence—a reversal of the previously-dominant Calvinist belief that children were depraved, sinful creatures. As the idea of childhood innocence took hold, it became racialized: popular culture constructed white children as innocent and vulnerable while excluding black youth from these qualities. Actors, writers, and visual artists then began pairing white children with African American adults and children, thus transferring the quality of innocence to a variety of racial-political projects—a dynamic that Robin Bernstein calls “racial innocence.” This phenomenon informed racial formation from the mid nineteenth century through the early twentieth. Racial Innocence takes up a rich archive including books, toys, theatrical props, and domestic knickknacks which Bernstein analyzes as “scriptive things” that invite or prompt historically-located practices while allowing for resistance and social improvisation. Integrating performance studies with literary and visual analysis, Bernstein offers singular readings of theatrical productions from blackface minstrelsy to Uncle Tom’s Cabin to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; literary works by Joel Chandler Harris, Harriet Wilson, and Frances Hodgson Burnett; material culture including Topsy pincushions, Uncle Tom and Little Eva handkerchiefs, and Raggedy Ann dolls; and visual texts ranging from fine portraiture to advertisements for lard substitute. Throughout, Bernstein shows how “innocence” gradually became the exclusive province of white children—until the Civil Rights Movement succeeded not only in legally desegregating public spaces, but in culturally desegregating the concept of childhood itself. Check out the author's blog for the book here.