The Nineteenth-century Novel

A Critical Reader

Author: Stephen Regan

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 573

View: 108

Most undergraduate literature courses begin with a compulsory survey course on the novel. The Nineteenth-Century Novel: A Critical Reader fills a real gap in the market as no other book provides such a comprehensive selection of contemporary and modern essays and reviews on the most important novels of the period. By bringing together a range of material written across two centuries, it offers an insight into the changing reception of realist fiction and a discussion of how complex debates about the meaning and function of realism informed and shaped the kind of fiction that was written in the nineteenth century. The novels discussed are: Northanger Abbey, Jane Eyre, Dombey and Son, Middlemarch, Far From the Madding Crowd, Germinal, Madame Bovary, The Woman in White, The Portrait of a Lady, The Awakening, Dracula, Heart of Darkness.

The Nineteenth-century Novel

Realisms

Author: Delia da Sousa Correa

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 414

View: 539

This text explores the scope and variety of the great novels of the 19th century. The essays in this collection trace the experimentation of 19th-century writers in advancing new modes of realist fiction.

Reading the Nineteenth-century Novel

Austen to Eliot

Author: Alison Case

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 542

This text offers students and teachers a close analysis of nineteenth-century novels by ten major authors: Austen, Eliot, Scott, Thackeray, Gaskell, Dickens, Trollope, Braddon, and the Brontë sisters. Examines a wide range of nineteenth-century novels - Persuasion, Middlemarch, The Heart of Midlothian, Vanity Fair, Mary Barton, Bleak House, The Warden, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre Explores significant theoretical approaches such as Foucauldian, Postcolonial, Bakhtinian, and feminist criticism Employs an “appreciative” model of criticism, sparking a renewed interest in engaging with Victorian aesthetics on its own terms Offers an overview of the social, economic, and political change that influenced the fiction of the time

The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Identities

Author: Dennis Walder

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 895

The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Identities provides an ideal starting point for understanding gender in the novels of this period. It explores the place of fiction in constructing gender identity within society at large, considering Madame Bovary, Portrait of a Lady and The Woman in White. The book continues with a consideration of the novel at the fin de siecle, examining Dracula, The Awakening and Heart of Darkness. These fascinating essays illuminate the ways in which the conventions of realism were disrupted as much by anxieties surrounding colonialism, decadence, degeneration and the 'New Woman' as by those new ideas about human psychology which heralded the advent of psychoanalysis. The concepts which are crucial to the understanding of the literature and society of the nineteenth century are brilliantly explained and discussed in this essential volume.

Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-century Novel

Author: Catherine Delafield

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 191

View: 438

Using private diary writing as her model, Catherine Delafield investigates the cultural significance of nineteenth-century women's writing and reading practices. Examining historical and fictional diaries by authors such as Frances Burney, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anne Brontë, Wilkie Collins and Bram Stoker, Delafield reveals the ideological discrepancy between the private diary and its performance in the role of narrator, offering fresh insights into domesticity, authorship, and the diary as a feminine form and model for narrative.

Sex, Politics, and Science in the Nineteenth-Century Novel

Author: Ruth Bernard Yeazell

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 642

"This collection is... a lesson to editors about how different types of subjects may profitably be brought together in one volume. And though the feminist orientation is provocative, there is a complete absence of any tone of vindictiveness, and an obvious determination to get at the truth." -- Eugene Kraft, English Literature in Transition.

Bad Form

Social Mistakes and the Nineteenth-Century Novel

Author: Kent Puckett

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 216

Bad Form argues that the social mistake - the blunder, the gaffe, the faux pas - is crucial to the structure of the nineteenth-century novel.

The Nineteenth-century Novel

Identities

Author: Dennis Walder

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 559

The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Identities provides an ideal starting point for understanding gender in the novels of this period. It explores the place of fiction in constructing gender identity within society at large, considering Madame Bovary, Portrait of a Lady and The Woman in White. The book continues with a consideration of the novel at the fin de siecle, examining Dracula, The Awakening and Heart of Darkness. These fascinating essays illuminate the ways in which the conventions of realism were disrupted as much by anxieties surrounding colonialism, decadence, degeneration and the 'New Woman' as by those new ideas about human psychology which heralded the advent of psychoanalysis. The concepts which are crucial to the understanding of the literature and society of the nineteenth century are brilliantly explained and discussed in this essential volume.

The Nineteenth Century Novel

Critical Essays and Documents

Author: Arnold Kettle

Publisher: Heinemann Educational Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 351

View: 448

The Fallen Woman in the Nineteenth-Century English Novel

Author: George Watt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 238

View: 239

A sympathetic view of the fallen women in Victorian England begins in the novel. First published in 1984, this book shows that the fallen woman in the nineteenth-century novel is, amongst other things, a direct response to the new society. Through the examination of Dickens, Gaskell, Collins, Moore, Trollope, Gissing and Hardy, it demonstrates that the fallen woman is the first in a long line of sympathetic creations which clash with many prevailing social attitudes, and especially with the supposedly accepted dichotomy of the ‘two women’. This book will be of interest to students of nineteenth-century literature and women in literature.