The New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War I

Author: Wayne Stack

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 486

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force earned an elite reputation on the Western Front In World War I, and the New Zealanders' war effort was a defining moment in their national history. The statistics are astonishing: of the total population of New Zealand of 1 million, no fewer than 100,000 men enlisted, and of those, 18,000 were killed and 58,000 wounded. In other words, 15 percent of the male population of New Zealand became casualties. Famously, the NZEF was first committed at Gallipoli in 1915, but NZ cavalry regiments also helped defend Egypt and fought in Palestine with Allenby's famous Desert Mounted Corps. On the Western Front the Kiwis were called the 'Silent Division' for their fieldcraft and their uncomplaining professionalism. This book is both a tribute and a history of the contribution made by a small nation.

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War II

Author: Wayne Stack

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 955

In 1939 more than 140,000 New Zealanders enlisted to fight overseas during World War II. Of these, 104,000 served in the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Initially thrown into the doomed campaign to halt the German blitzkrieg on Greece and Crete (1941), the division was rebuilt under the leadership of MajGen Sir Bernard Freyberg, and became the elite corps within Montgomery's Eighth Army in the desert. After playing a vital role in the victory at El Alamein (1942) the 'Kiwis' were the vanguard of the pursuit to Tunisia. In 1943–45 the division was heavily engaged in the Italian mountains, especially at Cassino (1944); it ended the war in Trieste. Meanwhile, a smaller NZ force supported US forces against the Japanese in the Solomons and New Guinea (1942–44). Fully illustrated with specially commissioned colour plates, this is the story of the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force's vital contribution to Allied victory in World War II.

Greece Crete Stalag Dachau

A New Zealand Soldier's Encounters with Hitler's Army

Author: Jack Elworthy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 246

View: 960

In 1940, 28-year-old Jack Elworthy left to fight in Europe. He would return seven years later, changed forever. Like many soldiers, Jack had experienced the best and worst of human nature, from kindness and bravery of Crete civilians to the unimaginable horrors of Dachau. He escaped from Greece as the Nazis rolled in, fought and was captured in Crete, and endured four years in Germany's notorious POW camp Stalag VIIIB. Freed by American forces in 1945, he talked his way into the US Army's Thunderbird Division, which then made its way to Munich, and ultimately the liberation of Dachau. After seeing the concentration camp, he wrote of his 'disbelief that there existed a kind of people who could gas rooms full of naked people and shoot rows of kneeling men, women and children, day after day'. Jack's war was not over. Back in Britain awaiting repatriation, he devised a plan to return to devastated Europe, and succeeded, to the disbelief of MI5, who would later strong-arm him into revealing how he'd done it.

World War I

Encyclopedia

Author: Spencer Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1661

View: 351

Featuring a wealth of new information and the work of acclaimed scholars from around the world, this monumental resource is the new standard reference on the 20th century's most influential conflict. * 1,219 A-Z entries covering military culture and tactics for all engaged armies in unprecedented depth, describing important events (the sinking of the Lusitania, the Arab revolt), cultural and political figures (Ferdinand Foch, Wilfred Owen), geopolitical agreements (the covenant of the League of Nations), social issues (the role of religions), and much more * 175 contributors, including scholars from the United States, Britain, China, Japan, Australia, France, Germany, Austria, and Scandinavia, giving this encyclopedia an unprecedented global perspective * A separate primary source volume with 195 official documents, diary entries, and letters from all types of people involved in the war, with introductory information to place the documents in historical context * An opening section of 35 battle and locational maps providing the geographic context necessary to understand how the conflict moved and where and why the battlefield stalled * Insightful introductory essays that discuss the root causes of the war, the catalyzing events that lead to the outbreak of war, an overview of the war itself, and a discussion of the long-term impact of the war, providing context for the A-Z entries that follow * A list of comparative military ranks, glossary, historiography, and general bibliography, plus a comprehensive chronology providing researchers and readers with a sense of time and relationship between the major events of the conflict

Battle for Crete

The New Zealand Division in Action

Author: New Zealand. Army. Expeditionary Force, 2nd

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page: 48

View: 370

Godley

The man behind the myth

Author: TERRY KINLOCH

Publisher: Exisle Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Generals

Page: 328

View: 381

A comprehensive biography of General Sir Alexander Godley, presenting for the first time a fair and balanced look at his time as commander of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) and II ANZAC Corps during World War I. While Godley is generally remembered as being a poor field commander, Terry Kinloch argues that he was in fact a capable one who had little or no ability to influence the failed battles at Gallipoli and Passchendaele that he is often seen as responsible for. Kinloch also presents, for the first time, a detailed account of Godley’s long pre- and post-World War I career in the British Army. After the war Godley returned to the British Army, eventually reaching the rank of general before retiring in 1933. During his 48-year military career, he also served on operations in Rhodesia and South Africa, as a mounted infantry instructor, in the post-war British occupation force in Germany, and as the Governor of Gibraltar.

Soldiers from the Pacific

The Story of Pacific Island Soldiers in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War One

Author: Howard Weddell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Soldiers

Page: 254

View: 497

Watriama and Co

Further Pacific Islands Portraits

Author: Hugh Laracy

Publisher: ANU E Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 284

View: 289

WATRIAMA AND CO (the title echoes Kipling's STALKY AND CO!) is a collection of biographical essays about people associated with the Pacific Islands. It covers a period of almost a century and a half. However, the individual stories of first-hand experience converge to some extent in various ways so as to present a broadly coherent picture of 'Pacific History'. In this, politics, economics and religion overlap. So, too, do indigenous cultures and concerns; together with the activities and interests of the Europeans who ventured into the Pacific and who had a profound, widespread and enduring impact there from the nineteenth century, and who also prompted reactions from the Island peoples. Not least significant in this process is the fact that the Europeans generated a 'paper trail' through which their stories and those of the Islanders (who also contributed to their written record) can be known. Thus, not only are the subjects of the essays to be encountered personally, and within a contextual kinship, but the way in which the past has shaped the future is clearly discernible. Watriama himself features in various historical narratives. So, too, certain of his confreres in this collection, which is the product of several decades of exploring the Pacific past in archives, by sea, and on foot through most of Oceania.