As You Like It

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

View: 701

Shakespeare's As You Like It can appear bright or sombre in performance: a feast of language and a delight for comic actors; or a risk-taking exploration of gender roles. This updated edition provides an account of what makes this popular play both innocent and dangerous. There is a section on recent critical, stage and film interpretations of the play, an updated reading list and a new appendix on an early court performance of As You Like It in 1599. Mapping the complexities of the play's setting – a no man's land related to both France and England, the edition also includes detailed commentary on its language and an analytical account of performance.

The Practical Shakespeare

The Plays in Practice and on the Page

Author: Colin Butler

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 205

View: 382

A comprehensive treatment of Shakespeare's plays in clear prose, The Practical Shakespeare: The Plays in Practice and on the Page illuminates for a general audience how and why the plays work so well.Noting in detail the practical and physical limitations the Bard faced as he worked out the logistics of his plays, Colin Butler demonstrates how Shakespeare incorporated and exploited those limitations to his advantage: his management of entrances and exits; his characterization technique; his handling of scenes off stage; his control of audience responses; his organization of major scenes; and his use of prologues and choruses. A different aspect of the plays is covered in each chapter?and all chapters are free-standing, for separate consultation. For easy access, chapters also are subdivided, and each part has its own heading. Butler draws most of his examples from mainstream plays, such as Macbeth, Othello, and Much Ado About Nothing. He brings special focus to A Midsummer Night's Dream, which is treated as one of Shakespeare's most important plays. Butler supports his major points with quotations, so readers can understand an issue even if they are unfamiliar with the particular play being discussed. The author also cross-references dramatic devices among plays, increasing enjoyment and understanding of Shakespeare's achievements. Clear, jargon-free, easy-to-use, and comprehensive, The Practical Shakespeare looks to the elements of stagecraft and playwriting as a conduit for students, teachers, and general audiences to engage with, understand, and appreciate the genius of Shakespeare. Colin Butler, previously the head of an English department at a British grammar school, lives in Canterbury, England, where he writes on literary subjects.

Shakespeare's Visual Theatre

Staging the Personified Characters

Author: Frederick Kiefer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 358

View: 906

Table of contents

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature: Volume 1, 600-1660

Author: George Watson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1282

View: 787

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

A Grammar of Shakespeare's Language

Author: N.F. Blake

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 432

View: 993

When you read Shakespeare or watch a performance of one of his plays, do you find yourself wondering what it was he actually meant? Do you consult modern editions of Shakespeare's plays only to find that your questions still remain unanswered? A Grammar of Shakespeare's Language, the first comprehensive grammar of Shakespeare's language for over one hundred years, will help you find out exactly what Shakespeare meant. Steering clear of linguistic jargon, Professor Blake provides a detailed analysis of Shakespeare's language. He includes accounts of the morphology and syntax of different parts of speech, as well as highlighting features such as concord, negation, repetition and ellipsis. He treats not only traditional features such as the make-up of clauses, but also how language is used in various forms of conversational exchange, such as forms of address, discourse markers, greetings and farewells. This book will help you to understand much that may have previously seemed difficult or incomprehensible, thus enhancing your enjoyment of his plays.

Doubt and Skepticism in Antiquity and the Renaissance

Author: Michelle Zerba

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 832

This book is an interdisciplinary study of the forms and uses of doubt in works by Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Cicero, Machiavelli, Shakespeare and Montaigne. Based on close analysis of literary and philosophical texts by these important authors, Michelle Zerba argues that doubt is a defining experience in antiquity and the Renaissance, one that constantly challenges the limits of thought and representation. The wide-ranging discussion considers issues that run the gamut from tragic loss to comic bombast, from psychological collapse to skeptical dexterity and from solitary reflection to political improvisation in civic contexts and puts Greek and Roman treatments of doubt into dialogue not only with sixteenth-century texts but with contemporary works as well. Using the past to engage questions of vital concern to our time, Zerba demonstrates that although doubt sometimes has destructive consequences, it can also be conducive to tolerance, discovery and conversation across sociopolitical boundaries.

Shakespeare's Non-Standard English: A Dictionary of his Informal Language

Author: Norman Blake

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 480

View: 818

Most scholarly attention on Shakespeare's vocabulary has been directed towards his enrichment of the language through borrowing words from other languages and has thus concentrated on the more learned aspects of his vocabulary. But the bulk of Shakespeare's output consists of plays in which he employs a colloquial and informal style using such features as discourse markers or phrasal verbs. Both today and in earlier periods many informal words were gradually accepted into the standard language, and it may be difficult to recognize when certain words have become acceptable. This dictionary lists the types of words which constitute informal language, which are most often associated with less educated speakers. As with other books in this series the words are grouped either by semantic identity, such as words for 'head', or by some linguistic feature such as 'discourse markers', with some words that don't fit into specific categories, listed separately.

William Shakespeare: 'Richard II'

Author: Michael Hattaway

Publisher: Humanities-Ebooks

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 102

View: 620

An authoritative study of Richard II in its theatrical, cultural and political contexts. Professor Hattaway's study places Richard II within the contexts of Shakespeare's life and of the strenuous political debates that were taking place at the end of the reign of Elizabeth I. It offers a commentary upon the unfolding action of the play, stressing possible alternative readings of the text, and noting how directors have made particular decisions about these. It ends with two shorter linked chapters on aspects of the play's critical traditions and on selected stage productions.

The New Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare

Author: Margreta De Grazia

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 380

View: 645

Written by a team of leading international scholars, this Companion is designed to illuminate Shakespeare's works through discussion of the key topics of Shakespeare studies. Twenty-one essays provide lively and authoritative approaches to recent scholarship and criticism for readers keen to expand their knowledge and appreciation of Shakespeare. The book contains stimulating chapters on traditional topics such as Shakespeare's biography and the transmission of his texts. Individual readings of the plays are given in the context of genre as well as through the cultural and historical perspectives of race, sexuality and gender, and politics and religion. Essays on performance survey the latest digital media as well as stage and film. Throughout the volume, contributors discuss Shakespeare in a global as well as a national context, a dramatist with a long and constantly mutating history of reception and performance.