How the Suburbs Were Segregated

Developers and the Business of Exclusionary Housing, 1890–1960

Author: Paige Glotzer

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 837

The story of the rise of the segregated suburb often begins during the New Deal and the Second World War, when sweeping federal policies hollowed out cities, pushed rapid suburbanization, and created a white homeowner class intent on defending racial barriers. Paige Glotzer offers a new understanding of the deeper roots of suburban segregation. The mid-twentieth-century policies that favored exclusionary housing were not simply the inevitable result of popular and elite prejudice, she reveals, but the culmination of a long-term effort by developers to use racism to structure suburban real estate markets. Glotzer charts how the real estate industry shaped residential segregation, from the emergence of large-scale suburban development in the 1890s to the postwar housing boom. Focusing on the Roland Park Company as it developed Baltimore’s wealthiest, whitest neighborhoods, she follows the money that financed early segregated suburbs, including the role of transnational capital, mostly British, in the U.S. housing market. She also scrutinizes the business practices of real estate developers, from vetting homebuyers to negotiating with municipal governments for services. She examines how they sold the idea of the suburbs to consumers and analyzes their influence in shaping local and federal housing policies. Glotzer then details how Baltimore’s experience informed the creation of a national real estate industry with professional organizations that lobbied for planned segregated suburbs. How the Suburbs Were Segregated sheds new light on the power of real estate developers in shaping the origins and mechanisms of a housing market in which racial exclusion and profit are still inextricably intertwined.

Frank Lloyd Wright

A Bio-bibliography

Author: Donald Langmead

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 430

View: 173

A comprehensive guide to the literature on Frank Lloyd Wright.

Developing Expertise

Architecture and Real Estate in Metropolitan America

Author: Sara Stevens

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 288

View: 988

Real estate developers are integral to understanding the split narratives of twentieth-century American urban history. Rather than divide the decline of downtowns and the rise of suburbs into separate tales, Sara Stevens uses the figure of the real estate developer to explore how cities found new urban and architectural forms through both suburbanization and urban renewal. Through nuanced discussions of Chicago, Kansas City, Detroit, Pittsburgh, Denver, Washington, D.C., and New York, Stevens explains how real estate developers, though often maligned, have shaped public policy through professional organizations, promoted investment security through design, and brought suburban models to downtowns. In this timely book, she considers how developers partnered with prominent architects, including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and I. M. Pei, to sell their modern urban visions to the public. By viewing real estate developers as a critical link between capital and construction in prewar suburban development and postwar urban renewal, Stevens offers an original and enlightening look at the complex connections among suburbs and downtowns, policy, finance, and architectural history.

Report

Author: United States Housing Corporation

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Working class

Page:

View: 615

Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development

The Kansas City Experience, 1900-2000

Author: Kevin Fox Gotham

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 206

Examines how the real estate industry and federal housing policy facilitate the development of racial residential segregation.

Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development, Second Edition

The Kansas City Experience, 1900-2010

Author: Kevin Fox Gotham

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 829

Updated second edition examining how the real estate industry and federal housing policy have facilitated the development of racial residential segregation. Traditional explanations of metropolitan development and urban racial segregation have emphasized the role of consumer demand and market dynamics. In the first edition of Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development Kevin Fox Gotham reexamined the assumptions behind these explanations and offered a provocative new thesis. Using the Kansas City metropolitan area as a case study, Gotham provided both quantitative and qualitative documentation of the role of the real estate industry and the Federal Housing Administration, demonstrating how these institutions have promulgated racial residential segregation and uneven development. Gotham challenged contemporary explanations while providing fresh insights into the racialization of metropolitan space, the interlocking dimensions of class and race in metropolitan development, and the importance of analyzing housing as a system of social stratification. In this second edition, he includes new material that explains the racially unequal impact of the subprime real estate crisis that began in late 2007, and explains why racial disparities in housing and lending remain despite the passage of fair housing laws and antidiscrimination statutes. Kevin Fox Gotham is Professor of Sociology at Tulane University.