The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

Author: Alex Epstein

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 218

Could everything we know about fossil fuels be wrong? For decades, environmentalists have told us that using fossil fuels is a self-destructive addiction that will destroy our planet. Yet at the same time, by every measure of human well-being, from life expectancy to clean water to climate safety, life has been getting better and better. How can this be? The explanation, energy expert Alex Epstein argues in The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels, is that we usually hear only one side of the story. We’re taught to think only of the negatives of fossil fuels, their risks and side effects, but not their positives—their unique ability to provide cheap, reliable energy for a world of seven billion people. And the moral significance of cheap, reliable energy, Epstein argues, is woefully underrated. Energy is our ability to improve every single aspect of life, whether economic or environmental. If we look at the big picture of fossil fuels compared with the alternatives, the overall impact of using fossil fuels is to make the world a far better place. We are morally obligated to use more fossil fuels for the sake of our economy and our environment. Drawing on original insights and cutting-edge research, Epstein argues that most of what we hear about fossil fuels is a myth. For instance . . . Myth: Fossil fuels are dirty. Truth: The environmental benefits of using fossil fuels far outweigh the risks. Fossil fuels don’t take a naturally clean environment and make it dirty; they take a naturally dirty environment and make it clean. They don’t take a naturally safe climate and make it dangerous; they take a naturally dangerous climate and make it ever safer. Myth: Fossil fuels are unsustainable, so we should strive to use “renewable” solar and wind. Truth: The sun and wind are intermittent, unreliable fuels that always need backup from a reliable source of energy—usually fossil fuels. There are huge amounts of fossil fuels left, and we have plenty of time to find something cheaper. Myth: Fossil fuels are hurting the developing world. Truth: Fossil fuels are the key to improving the quality of life for billions of people in the developing world. If we withhold them, access to clean water plummets, critical medical machines like incubators become impossible to operate, and life expectancy drops significantly. Calls to “get off fossil fuels” are calls to degrade the lives of innocent people who merely want the same opportunities we enjoy in the West. Taking everything into account, including the facts about climate change, Epstein argues that “fossil fuels are easy to misunderstand and demonize, but they are absolutely good to use. And they absolutely need to be championed. . . . Mankind’s use of fossil fuels is supremely virtuous—because human life is the standard of value and because using fossil fuels transforms our environment to make it wonderful for human life.”

The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels, Revised Edition

Author: Alex Epstein

Publisher: Portfolio

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 974

Now revised and updated--from the New York Times bestselling author, a contrarian cost-benefit analysis that will make you question everything you thought you knew about fossil fuels. For decades we've been told that using fossil fuels is a self-destructive addiction that will destroy our planet. Yet at the same time, life has been getting better and better by every measure of human well-being, from access to clean water to climate safety. How can this be? In this timely and necessary book, energy expert Alex Epstein argues that we've only heard one side of the story. Today's climate activists and environmental pundits focus solely on the side effects of fossil fuels but completely ignore their unique ability to provide cheap, reliable energy for a world of seven billion people. Drawing on original insights and cutting-edge research, Epstein shows that most of what we've been told about fossil fuels is a myth. For instance... Myth: Fossil fuels are making the climate unlivable. Truth: Fossil fuels haven't taken a naturally safe climate and made it dangerous; they've taken a naturally dangerous climate and made it safer than ever. Myth: Solar and wind can replace fossil fuels. Truth: Sun and wind are unreliable and always need backup from a reliable source - almost always fossil fuels. Myth: Fossil fuels are hurting the developing world. Truth: Fossil fuels are the key to improving the quality of life for billions of people in the developing world--including their ability to adapt to a changing climate. Now fully updated with the latest data and addressing recent controversies from "peak oil demand" to the Green New Deal, The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels is sure to challenge your assumptions.

Summary of Alex Epstein's The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

Author: Milkyway Media

Publisher: Milkyway Media

ISBN:

Category: Study Aids

Page:

View: 626

Get the summary from Alex Epstein's The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels #1 The conventional wisdom is that our use of fossil fuels is an addiction, a short-term, destructive habit that must be stopped. #2 The debate over our addiction to fossil fuels is usually over how dangerous the addiction is and how quickly we can get rid of it. #3 The author used to be against fossil fuels, but now realizes that they have made our lives better in every way, and that we need to keep using them.

Summary of Alex Epstein's the Moral Case for Fossil Fuels

Author: I. D. B. Books

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 42

View: 256

Get the summary from Alex Epstein's The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels #1 The conventional wisdom is that our use of fossil fuels is an addiction, a short-term, destructive habit that must be stopped. #2 The debate over our addiction to fossil fuels is usually over how dangerous the addiction is and how quickly we can get rid of it. #3 The author used to be against fossil fuels, but now realizes that they have made our lives better in every way, and that we need to keep using them.

Fossil Future

Why Global Human Flourishing Requires More Oil, Coal, and Natural Gas--Not Less

Author: Alex Epstein

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 177

The New York Times bestselling author of The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels draws on the latest data and new insights to challenge everything you thought you knew about the future of energy For over a decade, philosopher and energy expert Alex Epstein has predicted that any negative impacts of fossil fuel use on our climate will be outweighed by the unique benefits of fossil fuels to human flourishing--including their unrivaled ability to provide low-cost, reliable energy to billions of people around the world, especially the world’s poorest people. And contrary to what we hear from media “experts” about today’s “renewable revolution” and “climate emergency,” reality has proven Epstein right: • Fact: Fossil fuels are still the dominant source of energy around the world, and growing fast—while much-hyped renewables are causing skyrocketing electricity prices and increased blackouts. • Fact: Fossil-fueled development has brought global poverty to an all-time low. • Fact: While fossil fuels have contributed to the 1 degree of warming in the last 170 years, climate-related deaths are at all-time lows thanks to fossil-fueled development. What does the future hold? In Fossil Future, Epstein, applying his distinctive “human flourishing framework” to the latest evidence, comes to the shocking conclusion that the benefits of fossil fuels will continue to far outweigh their side effects—including climate impacts—for generations to come. The path to global human flourishing, Epstein argues, is a combination of using more fossil fuels, getting better at “climate mastery,” and establishing “energy freedom” policies that allow nuclear and other truly promising alternatives to reach their full long-term potential. Today’s pervasive claims of imminent climate catastrophe and imminent renewable energy dominance, Epstein shows, are based on what he calls the “anti-impact framework”—a set of faulty methods, false assumptions, and anti-human values that have caused the media’s designated experts to make wildly wrong predictions about fossil fuels, climate, and renewables for the last fifty years. Deeply researched and wide-ranging, this book will cause you to rethink everything you thought you knew about the future of our energy use, our environment, and our climate.

The Moral Case for Profit Maximization

Author: Robert White

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business ethics

Page: 260

View: 904

"The Moral Case for Profit Maximization considers the moral status of profit maximization, arguing that profit maximization is moral when businessmen seek to maximize profit by forming values and cultivating the virtues"--

Climate Justice

Integrating Economics and Philosophy

Author: Ravi Kanbur

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 118

Climate justice requires sharing the burdens and benefits of climate change and its resolution equitably and fairly. It brings together justice between generations and justice within generations. In particular it requires that attempts to address justice between generations through various interventions designed to curb greenhouse emissions today do not end up creating injustice in our time by hurting the currently poor and vulnerable. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) summit in September 2015, and the Conference of Parties (COP) to the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris in December 2015, brought climate change and its development impact centre stage in global discussions. In the run up to Paris, Mary Robinson, former President of Ireland and UN Secretary General's Special Envoy for Climate Change, instituted the Climate Justice Dialogue "to mobilize political will and creative thinking to shape an ambitious and just international climate agreement in 2015". The editors of this volume, an economist and a philosopher, served on the High Level Advisory Committee of the Climate Justice Dialogue. They noted the overlap and mutual enforcement between the economic and philosophical discourses on climate justice. But they also noted the great need for these strands to come together to support the public and policy discourse. Climate Justice: Integrating Economics and Philosophy is the result. Bringing together contributions from economists and philosophers, Climate Justice illustrates the different approaches, how they overlap and interact, and what they have already learned from each other and might still have to learn.

Relations. Beyond Anthropocentrism. Vol. 6, No. 2 (2018). Energy Ethics: Emerging Perspectives in Times of Energy Transitions. Part II

Author: Giovanni Frigo

Publisher: LED Edizioni Universitarie

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 170

View: 475

Energy Ethics: a Literature Review, Giovanni Frigo - Contesting the Radical Monopoly: a Critical View on the Motorized Culture from a Cyclonaut Perspective, Damien Delorme - Desiring Ethics: Reflections on Veganism from an Observational Study of Transitions in Everyday Energy Use, Alice Dal Gobbo - Ethical Risk and Energy, Bertrand Andre Rossert - Coal Feeds My Family: Subsistence, Energy, and Industry in Central Appalachia, M. Joseph Aloi - Human Energy: Philosophical-Anthropological Presuppositions of Anthropogenic Energy, Movement, and Activity and Their Implications for Well-being, Roman Meinhold - Energy Ethics Outside the Box: Carl Mitcham in Conversation with Giovanni Frigo, Carl Mitcham - Giovanni Frigo - Energy Equality and the Challenges of Population Growth, Andrea Natan Feltrin - The Energy of Ethics / The Ethics of Energy: a Dialog with Irigaray, Varela and Jullien, Federico Battistutta - Alex Epstein, A Review of the Moral Case for Fossil Fuels (2014), Adam Briggle.

Thinking Through Climate Change

A Philosophy of Energy in the Anthropocene

Author: Adam Briggle

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 265

View: 189

In this creative exploration of climate change and the big questions confronting our high-energy civilization, Adam Briggle connects the history of philosophy with current events to shed light on the Anthropocene (the age of humanity). Briggle offers a framework to help us understand the many perspectives and policies on climate change. He does so through the idea that energy is a paradox: changing sameness. From this perennial philosophical mystery, he argues that a high-energy civilization is bound to create more and more paradoxes. These paradoxes run like fissures through our orthodox picture of energy as the capacity to do work and control fate. Climate change is the accumulation of these fissures and the question is whether we can sustain technoscientific control and economic growth. It may be that our world is about change radically, imploring us to start thinking heterodox thoughts.

Equitably Ending the Fossil Fuel Era

Climate Justice, Capital, & the Carbon Budget

Author: Georges Alexandre Lenferna

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 358

View: 124

This dissertation makes the moral case for equitably transitioning away from fossil fuels in line with keeping global warming as close as possible to the Paris Climate Agreement’s more stringent target of keeping global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. It argues that we should do so while relying as little as possible on risky and uncertain negative emissions and geoengineering technologies, as doing so might prolong the fossil fuel era and pose grave potential costs both to the present and future generations. The dissertation addresses a central objection to the moral imperative to transition away from fossil fuels, namely that it will detrimentally impact the poor and vulnerable. It argues in response that protecting the interests of the poor and vulnerable is best achieved through a rapid yet just transition away from fossil fuels. Based on the moral case to transition away from fossil fuels in line with 1.5°C the dissertation also explores what personal moral responsibility individuals have to take action to reduce fossil fuel usage and act on climate change. It does so by situating our moral responsibility in the context of what it argues is an emergency situation where need to rapidly and comprehensively move away from fossil fuels to avert catastrophic climate change and the immense harms associated with continued fossil fuel dependence. Based on the development of an Anti-Pollution Principle, it concludes that in the face of this emergency we have demanding moral responsibilities to reduce our personal emissions but which can be outweighed by the more important task of collectively pushing for deep, rapid, and comprehensive structural change away from fossil fuel dependency.