The Meaning of Cricket

or How to Waste Your Life on an Inconsequential Sport

Author: Jon Hotten

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 222

Cricket is a strange game. It is a team sport that is almost entirely dependent on individual performance. Its combination of time, opportunity and the constant threat of disaster can drive its participants to despair. To survive a single delivery propelled at almost 100 miles an hour takes the body and brain to the edges of their capabilities, yet its abiding image is of the gentle village green, and the glorious absurdities of the amateur game. In The Meaning of Cricket, Jon Hotten attempts to understand this fascinating, frustrating and complex sport. Blending legendary players, from Vivian Richards to Mark Ramprakash, Kevin Pietersen to Ricky Ponting, with his own cricketing story, he explores the funny, moving and melancholic impact the game can have on an individual life.

Cricket and the Law

The Man in White is Always Right

Author: David Fraser

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 438

View: 356

Cricket and the Law charts the inter-relationship between cricket - the law of the game, and legal theory - the law of our lives. Fraser draws connections and commonalities between these two seemingly disparate, complex sets of conventions. This study will be enjoyed by lawyers and students of law, sport, sociology and cultural studies, as well as cricket lovers everywhere.

Cricket, Literature and Culture

Symbolising the Nation, Destabilising Empire

Author: Anthony Bateman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 768

In his important contribution to the growing field of sports literature, Anthony Bateman traces the relationship between literary representations of cricket and Anglo-British national identity from 1850 to the mid 1980s. Examining newspaper accounts, instructional books, fiction, poetry, and the work of editors, anthologists, and historians, Bateman elaborates the ways in which a long tradition of literary discourse produced cricket's cultural status and meaning. His critique of writing about cricket leads to the rediscovery of little-known texts and the reinterpretation of well-known works by authors as diverse as Neville Cardus, James Joyce, the Great War poets, and C.L.R. James. Beginning with mid-eighteenth century accounts of cricket that provide essential background, Bateman examines the literary evolution of cricket writing against the backdrop of key historical moments such as the Great War, the 1926 General Strike, and the rise of Communism. Several case studies show that cricket simultaneously asserted English ideals and created anxiety about imperialism, while cricket's distinctively colonial aesthetic is highlighted through Bateman's examination of the discourse surrounding colonial cricket tours and cricketers like Prince Kumar Shri Ranjitsinhji of India and Sir Learie Constantine of Trinidad. Featuring an extensive bibliography, Bateman's book shows that, while the discourse surrounding cricket was key to its status as a symbol of nation and empire, the embodied practice of the sport served to destabilise its established cultural meaning in the colonial and postcolonial contexts.

The Cricket Field

Or the History and Science of the Game of Cricket

Author: James Pycroft

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cricket

Page: 344

View: 521

Wisden's The Laws Of Cricket

Author: Don Oslear

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 208

View: 935

WISDEN'S THE LAWS OF CRICKET sets out in full the text of the new laws of cricket, 42 in number (with permission of the MCC which own the copyright in them). For each law it provides a commentary covering the reasons for any changs, explaining the background, and highlighting how they are likely to affect the way the game is played at every level. Full discussion is devoted to the major contentious issues, such as the introduction of penalty runs for various misdemeanours, and the revisions to the 'no ball' law. Don Oslear, the distinguished umpire, has been intimately involved over several years in the process of drafting the new laws, and explains why they needed changing, what views his committe recieved from the governing bodies of all the cricketing nations and from players, spectators and the media, how these were resolved, and what effect they are expected to have on the future of the game. No one who plays cricket, or is seriously interested in the game, can afford to miss this book.

The Meaning of Luck

Stories of Learning, Leadership and Love

Author: Steve Waugh

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 526

View: 426

In The Meaning of Luck, former Australian cricket captain Steve Waugh explores the concept of luck, based on his experiences in the worlds of sport, business and philanthropy.

The Changing Face of Cricket

From Imperial to Global Game

Author: Dominic Malcolm

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 304

View: 184

For cricket enthusiasts there is nothing to match the meaningful contests and excitement generated by the game’s subtle shifts in play. Conversely, huge swathes of the world’s population find cricket the most obscure and bafflingly impenetrable of sports. The Changing Face of Cricket attempts to account for this paradox. The Changing Face of Cricket provides an overview of the various ways in which social scientists have analyzed the game’s cultural impact. The book’s international analysis encompasses Australia, the Caribbean, England, India, Ireland, South Africa, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe. Its interdisciplinary approach allies anthropology, history, literary criticism, political studies and sociology with contributions from cricket administrators and journalists. The collection addresses historical and contemporary issues such as gender equality, global sports development, the impact of cricket mega-events, and the growing influence of commercial and television interests culminating in the Twenty20 revolution. Whether one loves or hates the game, understands what turns square legs into fine legs, or how mid-offs become silly, The Changing Face of Cricket will enlighten the reader on the game’s cultural contours and social impact and prove to be the essential reader in cricket studies. This book was published as a special issue of Sport in Society.

Globalizing Cricket

Englishness, Empire and Identity

Author: Dominic Malcolm

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 208

View: 496

Globalizing Cricket examines the global role of the sport - how it developed and spread around the world. The book explores the origins of cricket in the eighteenth century, its establishment as England's national game in the nineteenth, the successful (Caribbean) and unsuccessful (American) diffusion of cricket as part of the development of the British Empire and its role in structuring contemporary identities amongst and between the English, the British and postcolonial communities. Whilst empirically focused on the sport itself, the book addresses broader issues such as social development, imperialism, race, diaspora and national identities. Tracing the beginnings of cricket as a 'folk game' through to the present, it draws together these different strands to examine the meaning and social significance of the modern game. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the role of sport in both colonial and post-colonial periods; the history and peculiarities of English national identity; or simply intrigued by the game and its history.

The Meaning of Everything

The Story of the Oxford English Dictionary

Author: Simon Winchester OBE

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 134

'The greatest enterprise of its kind in history,' was the verdict of British prime minister Stanley Baldwin in June 1928 when The Oxford English Dictionary was finally published. With its 15,490 pages and nearly two million quotations, it was indeed a monumental achievement, gleaned from the efforts of hundreds of ordinary and extraordinary people who made it their mission to catalogue the English language in its entirety. In The Meaning of Everything, Simon Winchester celebrates this remarkable feat, and the fascinating characters who played such a vital part in its execution, from the colourful Frederick Furnivall, cheerful promoter of an all-female sculling crew, to James Murray, self-educated son of a draper, who spent half a century guiding the project towards fruition. Along the way we learn which dictionary editor became the inspiration for Kenneth Grahame's Ratty in The Wind in the Willows, and why Tolkien found it so hard to define 'walrus'. Written by the bestselling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The Map That Changed the World, The Meaning of Everything is an enthralling account of the creation of the world's greatest dictionary.

Liberation Cricket

West Indies Cricket Culture

Author: Hilary Beckles

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Cricket

Page: 403

View: 640

Of the global community of cricketers, the West Indians are, arguably, the most well-known and feared. This book shows how this tradition of cricketing excellence and leadership emerged, and how it contributed to the rise of West Indian nationalism and independence.

Dph Sports Series Cricket

Author: Ashok Kumar

Publisher: Discovery Publishing House

ISBN:

Category: Cricket

Page: 222

View: 774

Contents: Practice, Fitness, Coaching, Equipment, Fielding, Length and Direction, Bowling, Batting, Wicketkeeping, Captaincy, Rules and Regulations.

Beefy's Cricket Tales

My Favourite Stories from On and Off the Field

Author: Ian Botham

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 288

View: 836

Life is very rarely dull or quiet when Sir Ian Botham is around. One of Britain's greatest sportsmen, 'Beefy' has always worked hard and played hard, and this book reflects that. Botham has compiled some of his favourite stories from a life devoted to cricket and brought them all together in one volume. With the help of his huge network of friends, colleagues, team-mates and opponents, he has put together a wonderful collection of the best and the funniest stories from the cricket world. Featuring contributions from legends such as Shane Warne, fellow commentators and former team-mates including David Gower, and many of the current England team, this is a book the reader can pick up and immediately be privy to some of cricket's strangest and most hilarious moments, from the player who turned up to a game without any clothes on to avoid being fined for wearing the wrong kit to the cricketing legend whose desire for a burger landed him in hot water.

The Tao of Cricket

On Games of Destiny and the Destiny of Games

Author: Ashis Nandy

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 150

View: 269

Cricket is an Indian game accidentally discovered by the British, says Ashis Nandy, defying history, in this delightful book. He treats us to meditations on the history, philosophy, and results of the game, as well as intriguing psychological profiles of some of its greatest players. He also extends his analysis to the modern urban-industrial ethic and mass culture.

The Skills of Cricket

Author: Keith Andrew

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cricket

Page: 136

View: 236

With the help of clear diagrams and scores of Test match and demonstration photographs, this book shows cricketers at all levels how they can improve their game. There are sections on every practical aspect from batting and bowling, fielding and fitness, captaincy and practice through to equipment and laws of the game.