Information Technology and Socialist Construction

The End of Capital and the Transition to Socialism

Author: Daniel E. Saros

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 293

View: 772

The failure of command central planning in the twentieth century has led to a general disillusionment within the socialist movement worldwide. Some alternatives to capitalism have been proposed since the end of the Cold War, but none has offered an alternative form of economic calculation. This book explains how modern information technology may be used to implement a new method of economic calculation that could bring an end to capitalism and make socialism possible. In this book, the author critically examines a number of socialist proposals that have been put forward since the end of the Cold War. It is shown that although these proposals have many merits, their inability effectively to incorporate the benefits of information technology into their models has limited their ability to solve the problem of socialist construction. The final section of the book proposes an entirely new model of socialist development, based on a "needs profile" that makes it possible to convert the needs of large numbers of people into data that can be used as a guide for resource allocation. This analysis makes it possible to rethink and carefully specify the conditions necessary for the abolition of capital and consequently the requirements for socialist revolution and, ultimately, communist society. Information Technology and Socialist Construction will be of interest to students and scholars of political economy, the history of economic thought, labour economics and industrial economics.

Capitalism and Classical Social Theory, Second Edition

Author: John Bratton

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 378

Most texts on classical social theory offer exhaustive coverage of every possible theorist, making it difficult to use the book in one semester. Capitalism and Classical Social Theory, Second Edition represents a departure from this approach by offering solid coverage of the classical triumvirate (Marx, Durkheim, and Weber), but also extending the canon strategically to include Simmel, four early female theorists, and the writings of Du Bois. The result is a manageable, but thorough, examination of the key classical theorists. The second edition has been updated throughout and includes two new chapters: one on Weber and rationalization, and one on Du Bois and his writings on race. A new concluding chapter links classical theory to current developments in capitalism during an age of austerity.

Social Theory

The Multicultural, Global, and Classic Readings

Author: Charles Lemert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 568

View: 671

For nearly a quarter-century, Charles Lemert has shared his love of social theory, and the questions it explores, in this collection of readings. With 140 selections that begin in the nineteenth century and end in 2015, Social Theory charts the long arc of the development of the field. This edition retains classic texts by Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and W.E.B. Du Bois and writings of major contemporary figures like Audre Lorde and Patricia Hill Collins, while adding pieces from Harriet Martineau, Friedrich Nietzsche, Kimberly Williams Crenshaw, Thomas Piketty, and Ta-Nehisi Coates, among others. Revised and updated with a new section exploring social theory at the limits of the social, Lemert's Social Theory remains essential reading.

The Persistence of Subsistence Agriculture

Life Beneath the Level of the Marketplace

Author: Tony Waters

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 909

The story told by The Persistence of Subsistence Agriculture begins 8,000 years ago as humans began using the land and weather to provide themselves with food, housing, and clothing. Productive farmers took care of most daily needs within the small conservative world in which they lived. This world organized around small-scale subsistence farming is ending as the ancient world of farmers has given away to that dominated by the modern marketplace. This book is about how the modern market world transformed these remote agricultural farmers. Waters uses diverse examples to illustrate how the modern market economy captured persistent subsistence farmers and forever altered life in 18th century Scotland, 19th century United States, 20th century Tanzania, and indeed, the entire modern world.

Marx's Scientific Dialectics

A Methodological Treatise for a New Century

Author: Paul Paolucci

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 268

This book examines both problems in traditional readings of Marx's texts and how he used several methods of science to inform his dialectical thinking, historical materialist research, political economic analyses, and his communist project. A case is made for Marx's continuing methodological relevance.

Marx and the Politics of Abstraction

Author: Paul Paolucci

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 239

View: 785

Through examining Marx's methods of critique and abstraction, this book presents a series of problems in conventional social thought and the alternatives Marx's approach poses. It demonstrates how sound social science abstraction cannot but have political, often radical, implications.

Marxist Historiographies

A Global Perspective

Author: Q. Edward Wang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 329

View: 813

Marxist Historiographies is the first book to examine the ebb and flow of Marxist historiography from a global and cross-cultural perspective. Since the eighteenth century, few schools of historical thought have exerted a more lasting impact than Marxism, and this impact extends far beyond the Western world within which it is most commonly analysed. Edited by two highly respected authors in the field, this book deals with the effect of Marxism on historical writings not only in parts of Europe, where it originated, but also in countries and regions in Africa, Asia, North and South America and the Middle East. Rather than presenting the chapters geographically, it is structured with respect to how Marxist influence was shown in the works of historians in a particular area. This title takes a dual approach to the subject; some chapters are national in scope, addressing the Marxist impact on historical practices within a country, whereas others deal with the varied expressions of Marxist historiography throughout a wider region. Taking a truly global perspective on this topic, Marxist Historiographies demonstrates clearly the breadth and depth of Marxism’s influence in historical writing throughout the world and is essential reading for all students of historiography.

Ten Lessons in Theory

An Introduction to Theoretical Writing

Author: Calvin Thomas

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 966

An introduction to literary theory unlike any other, Ten Lessons in Theory engages its readers with three fundamental premises. The first premise is that a genuinely productive understanding of theory depends upon a considerably more sustained encounter with the foundational writings of Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud than any reader is likely to get from the introductions to theory that are currently available. The second premise involves what Fredric Jameson describes as "the conviction that of all the writing called theoretical, Lacan's is the richest." Entertaining this conviction, the book pays more (and more careful) attention to the richness of Lacan's writing than does any other introduction to literary theory. The third and most distinctive premise of the book is that literary theory isn't simply theory "about" literature, but that theory fundamentally is literature, after all. Ten Lessons in Theory argues, and even demonstrates, that "theoretical writing" is nothing if not a specific genre of "creative writing," a particular way of engaging in the art of the sentence, the art of making sentences that make trouble sentences that make, or desire to make, radical changes in the very fabric of social reality. As its title indicates, the book proceeds in the form of ten "lessons," each based on an axiomatic sentence selected from the canon of theoretical writing. Each lesson works by creatively unpacking its featured sentence and exploring the sentence's conditions of possibility and most radical implications. In the course of exploring the conditions and consequences of these troubling sentences, the ten lessons work and play together to articulate the most basic assumptions and motivations supporting theoretical writing, from its earliest stirrings to its most current turbulences. Provided in each lesson is a working glossary: specific critical keywords are boldfaced on their first appearance and defined either in the text or in a footnote. But while each lesson constitutes a precise explication of the working terms and core tenets of theoretical writing, each also attempts to exemplify theory as a "practice of creativity" (Foucault) in itself.

Ideological Conflict and the Rule of Law in Contemporary China

Useful Paradoxes

Author: Samuli Seppänen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 215

View: 255

This book studies ideological divisions within Chinese legal academia and their relationship to arguments about the rule of law. The book describes argumentative strategies used by Chinese legal scholars to legitimize and subvert China's state-sanctioned ideology. It also examines Chinese efforts to invent new, alternative rule of law conceptions. In addition to this descriptive project, the book advances a more general argument about the rule of law phenomenon, insisting that many arguments about the rule of law are better understood in terms of their intended and actual effects rather than as analytic propositions or descriptive statements. To illustrate this argument, the book demonstrates that various paradoxical, contradictory and otherwise implausible arguments about the rule of law play an important role in Chinese debates about the rule of law. Paradoxical statements about the rule of law, in particular, can be useful for an ideological project.